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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

Table of Contents 

Title Page 

Mission Statement 1 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Town Manager 5 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk 12 

Board of Registrars 13 

Town Counsel 14 

Board of Assessors 17 

Town Treasurer/Collector 18 

Town Accountant 19 

Public Safety Fire Department 39 

Police Department 43 

Animal Control Officer 48 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department 49 

Permanent Building Committee 50 

Department of Public Works 51 

Water and Sewer Department 55 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs ..Library 57 

Wilmington Arts Council 65 

Carter Lecture Fund 67 

Historical Commission 67 

Recreation Department 70 

Elderly Services Department 74 

Housing Authority 7 9 

Disabilities, Commission on 79 

Veterans' Services 80 

Board of Health 80 

Cable T. V. Advisory Task Force 84 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 85 

Education Wilmington Public Schools 86 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc . Tech. H. S 113 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department 127 

Housing Partnership 132 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 133 

Middlesex Canal Commission 135 

Inspector of Buildings 137 

Board of Appeals 138 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 152 

Presidential Primary - March 2, 2004 152 

Annual Town Election - April 17, 2004 154 

Annual Town Meeting - April 24, 2004 155 

State Election - November 2, 2004 209 

Directory of Officials 211 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 212 

Officers and Department Heads 216 

Municipal Services Guide 217 

Meeting Dates and Times 221 

Accepted Streets 222 

Telephone Directory by Department 230 




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The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows 

"The Town of , Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, 
exists in order to deliver a wide range of municipal 
services to those who live, work or own property within 
the borders of Wilmington; and in order to make this 
community a good place to live, to woi-k, and to raise 
and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the, needs of the people.' They must be effective and 
efficient. Principles of honesty, fairness, 
dependability and compassion must govern the actions of 
the officials and the employees of the Town. Those who 
work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most 
important resource and the key to its success in 
serving the people of Wilmington." 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



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Ojfice of the 
Board of Selectmen 
(978) 658-3311 



Town of Wilmington 

121 Glen Road 
Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 



FAX (978) 658-3334 
TTY (978)694-1417 



Dear Fellow Resident: 

It is with great pleasure and an honor that I submit the following annual 
report, which serves to recap some of the key events and deliberations 
involving the board during 2004. 

Through the Blue Star Banner program the Board continued to honor young 
members of the Wilmington community for their call to duty in the Middle 
East . 

Environmental issues continued to be a major focus in 2004. Working with the 
Town Counsel, the Board approved a tolling agreement with the Olin 
Corporation and predecessor owners of the 51 Eames Street property. There 
are very specific time limits within which an aggrieved party can pursue 
claims against another party. This tolling agreement essentially stops the 
clock and preserves the town's right to pursue claims against Olin and their 
predecessors. The town continues to gather information about the impacts of 
the site contamination on the town and will continue to develop its legal 
options with Town Counsel . 

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) notified the Board in April 
that the estate of Clarence Spinazola and Massachusetts Environmental 
Associates (MEA) , the firm conducting remediation at the former Maple Meadow 
Landfill, were issued a notice of noncompliance and notice of enforcement 
conference. Work to remediate the site has ceased while DEP, the estate of 
Clarence Spinazola and MEA negotiate a revised administrative consent order 
with penalties (ACOP) . While the town has not been permitted to participate 
in those discussions, the Board continues to monitor the situation as it 
awaits the release of the ACOP. 

Selectman continued to express serious concerns with regard to a proposed 
reload facility slated for development by the New England Transrail 
Corporation on property currently owned by the Olin Corporation. This 
proposal, which has been submitted to the Surface Transportation Board (STB), 
a federal agency vested with the responsibility for authorizing such 
development, would enable the transfer of materials from rail to truck and 
vice versa. The company is also proposing to conduct limited solid waste 
transfer operations at this facility. The Board has worked with Town Counsel 
and staff to mount strong opposition to the STB's decision to allow such 
development without a full environmental impact report (EIR) . In addition to 
potential traffic and noise considerations with such a development, active 
reuse of a portion of the Olin property, which has still not been fully 
analyzed with respect to contamination and potential impacts, is not 
acceptable to the Board of Selectmen. 



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On the development front, the Board met with representatives from the city of 
Woburn including Mayor John Curran to discuss the reopening of the New Boston 
Street Bridge. The bridge which connected North Woburn with Woburn Street in 
Wilmington has been closed for many years. After receiving assurances that 
the recently constructed interstate 93 interchange in Woburn would largely 
minimize traffic impacts to Wilmington and with the agreement to pursue a 
truck exclusion on Woburn Street, the Board voted in the majority to support 
reopening of the New Boston Street Bridge. Proponents of the Inwood 
Development Park updated the Board on their plans for a 475 unit residential 
development. This project is largely in Woburn but its entrance is in 
Wilmington. The fact that the sole access to the development is from 
Wilmington has raised serious concerns about traffic impacts on West Street 
as well as impacts on emergency services. Representatives from the Mills 
Corporation updated the Selectman on their plans for a major retail and hotel 
development on the Tewksbury/Wilmington line. This proposal is in its early 
stages and requires approval from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
construct a new interchange off Interstate 93 to access the property. The 
Selectmen will continue to press the developers for information about any 
impacts, and or benefits to the Town of Wilmington. 

The Library Trustees presented the Board with a recommendation to pursue 
state grant funding for a new library. After considerable discussion the 
Board voted in the majority to support this effort with the proposed location 
to be the site of the current Swain School. Members of the Board expressed 
concern about asking tax payers to shoulder a greater tax burden for this 
project in light of the current financial circumstances with respect to the 
town's own finances and the financial strain faced by individual homeowners. 
The Board commends the Library Trustees and staff for the numerous 
opportunities made available for public comment and encourages residents to 
take advantage of these opportunities going forward. 

I am pleased to report that the fishing pier at Silver Lake was completed in 
the fall of 2004. This project which was first proposed by the late Rocco 
DePasquale, a former selectmen, was seven years in the making. The Board 
thanks its state legislative delegation for their efforts in pursuing funding 
for this important project. 

The Board wishes to extend its sincere thanks to Margaret Tarantino. Mrs. 
Tarantino has been our recording secretary for the past twelve years on the 
Board of Selectmen. She has also been the town manager's administrative 
assistant for many years. Mrs. Tarantino will be deeply missed as she just 
recently retired in 2005. 

The Board looks forward to working with Beverly Dalton as she replaces Mrs. 
Tarantino. No doubt she will be an asset to the community. 

The Board would like to recognize the outstanding contribution of the late 
Dorothy Lafioniatis. She was Wilmington's true historian. We honor her for 
her many years of volunteerism including her active support for preservation 
of the Harnden Tavern and her services on the Historical Commission. She was 
one of Wilmington's true treasures. 

On a personal note, as chairman over the past two years, I would like to 
thank the town manger. Both the town manager and myself have worked together 
well on behalf of the community. We have developed a better mutual respect 
for each other. Simply put, if we can agree to disagree respectfully as 
leaders of the community, this town and its people will benefit. Our main 
goal should be "the community comes first." I would also like to take this 
opportunity on behalf of the Board to thank town counsel Paul DeRensis. Town 
counsel has demonstrated to the board and the community that he is willing 
and very capable to guide us through current difficult legal situations. 



I also want to thank, all the town employees. Our police and fire departments 
make sure that we are safe at night when we sleep. Our department of public 
works and water department make sure that our infrastructure is second to 
none. Our department of public buildings make sure that our buildings are 
maintained and safe. And our town educators give our children the best 
education possible. On behalf of the entire membership, we thank those town 
employees . 

As we celebrate our 275'^^ year as a town, many fund raising events will be 
happening through the year. All of these events are held by volunteers from 
the community. Without these volunteers, we would not be able to conduct 
this milestone or celebrate the wonderful events of the Fourth of July week 
activities. The Town of Wilmington is a great community. There are many 
great people living here. Once again, the entire membership appreciates 
their hard and dedicated work. 

Finally, the Town of Wilmington has done well. When considering the state 
has cut our local aid, and the economy has been sluggish, I am happy to say 
that our town services are second to none. We had no layoffs, no new taxes, 
and no user fees. Other communities haven't been so lucky. 

I want to wish everyone a delightful, happy, and safe 275"^*^ anniversary. I 
look forward to seeing all of you again on our 300'^^. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Board of Selectmen, from left: Raymond N. Lepore, Suzanne M. Sullivan, Chairman Michael V. 
McCoy (seated), Michael J. Newhouse and Frank J. West. 



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Town of Wilmington 

1 2 1 GLEN RC).\D 
WILMINGTON, MA 1 887 



OFFICE OF THE FAX (978) 658-3334 

TOWN MANAGER TTY (978) 694- 1 4 1 7 

(978) 658-3311 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

At some point in our lives we have all been admonished to be patient. Many a 
parent has reassured a child that "good things happen to those who wait." 
Well, it finally happened. The Boston Red Sox are World Series Champions! 
The year 2004 was a great year for those of us who root for the home team. 
Interspersed between a Red Sox Championship and a Patriot ' s Superbowl Victory 
was the remarkable success of many of the town's local sports' teams. 
Wilmington High School boasted 2004 league championships in Boys' Basketball, 
Football and Golf and in Girls' Ice Hockey, Cheerleading, Softball and 
Soccer. Shawsheen Technical High School was recognized as the most 
successful vocational school in the Commonwealth for its achievements in 
interscholastic athletics. At year's end, the town recognized the Wilmington 
Pop Warner Cheerleaders who returned home from Florida with national honors. 

The town also enjoyed success on many fronts in 2004. The Massachusetts 
Municipal Association selected the Town of Wilmington as its first place 
recipient in the state-wide Annual Town Report Contest. Judging is based on 
the clarity and depth of information contained in the report as well on the 
report's presentation. The town's municipal calendar was a featured 
component of this report. The State Department of Environmental Protection's 
Drinking Water Program recognized the Wilmington Water Department for scoring 
within the top 10% in the 2004 Public Works System Awards Program. Scoring 
was based on a point system that evaluated compliance with the Drinking Water 
Regulations in areas such as administrative capacity, source protection, 
distribution, treatment, disinfecting and monitoring. 

The town received state approval on two major planning documents, the 
Community Development Plan and the Affording Housing Plan. As a result, the 
town requested and received a two-year housing certification based on its 
production of 143 units of affordable housing during calendar year 2004. 
This certification prevents a comprehensive permit applicant from appealing a 
denial or a conditional approval from the Board of Appeals to the State's 
Housing Appeals Committee. 

At year's end. Standard and Poor's Rating Services affirmed its "AA" rating 
and stable outlook on the town's general obligation bonds. According to the 
rating agency, the "AA" rating reflects the town's access to the Boston 
Metropolitan area; considerable property tax base which is experiencing 
modest growth; above average wealth and income levels; strong financial 
position; and low debt burden, coupled with a rapid amortization schedule. 
Despite the positive financial rating, the town is entering a new budget year 
with a deliberate plan to restrict spending consistent with forecasts of 
reductions in available funds. The town's budget has relied on operating 



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reserves over the past several years to ensure a continuation and expansion 
of town services. Although the town's free cash position is far better than 
most communities, with a certified balance of $4,334,791.00, overall economic 
conditions dictate that the town reduce its reliance on operating reserves. 
While expenditures will be pared, it is equally critical that the town 
identify new revenue sources in order to lessen its reliance on dwindling 
reserves . 

Town Meeting support has enabled the town to fund a variety of important 
capital expenditures including replacement vehicles for the town's fleet. 
Four replacement cruisers were purchased for the Police Department and two 
maintenance vehicles were purchased for the Department of Public Works to 
replace trucks no longer in service. A new mini -van was purchased to enable 
the Animal Control Officer to better meet her responsibilities and two 
student transportation vans were purchased for the School Department, one of 
which is handicapped accessible. 

There were a number of improvements made to municipal, school and 
recreational facilities in 2004. Among the improvements to the schools were: 



The replacement of 4,100 square feet of roof at the Woburn Street 
School to complete the school's roofing project. 

Improvements to the computer labs at the Woburn Street and Shawsheen 
Schools. 

The completion of the interior painting at the North Intermediate 
School . 

Lighting improvements at the West Intermediate School. 
Improvements to the High School's front entrance. 
Boiler replacement in the High School cafeteria. 



Significant improvements were made to municipal buildings in 2004, including: 



• The installation of a complete new roof at the Town Hall. 

• The installation of seventeen ductless, split air conditioning units 
throughout the Library to replace the existing air cooling system 
which proved inadequate to the task of keeping the Library comfortable 
and dry during the humid summer months . 

• The installation of 1,000 square yards of carpet tiles to replace the 
existing carpeting in the Library which was over twenty years old. 

The town made good use of available resources to supplement important 
initiatives and to finance capital improvements. For example, the Public 
Buildings Department utilized the Inmate Work Program of the Middlesex County 
Sheriff's Department to complete painting projects at the Town Hall, Roman 
House and Memorial Library. The Department of Public Works utilized that 
same program to assist work crews with cleanup activities throughout the 
town. A Police Grant enabled the town to add to its purchase of portable 
speed monitors. As a result, a fourth digital, speed-monitoring sign will be 
installed on Wilmington roadways. 

As a result of a bequest from the Estate of Donald Blaisdell, a major 
improvement project got under way at the Buzzell Senior Center. Interior 
space has been remodeled to increase the size of the main function hall. 
Soundproof rolling wall enclosures will be installed to enable the 
simultaneous offering of multiple programs. The installation of a new sound 




system and entertainment center, coupled with improved lighting and new 
furnishings have provided the Center with a well -deserved interior facelift. 

Voters who cast ballots at the September and November state and federal 
elections experienced a change in Wilmington's traditional method of voting. 
The Help America Vote Act enacted in 2002 mandated that all communities 
employing lever machines replace them by 2004. As a result, the town 
purchased new optical scan voting machines and complementary voting booths. 
Nearly two thirds of the cost for the new system was reimbursed by the 
federal government. 

The Public Works Department was asked to undertake an incredibly ambitious 
agenda this past year. Major projects included completion of roadway 
improvements in North Wilmington, including the opening of the North 
Wilmington municipal parking lot; the first phase of the reconstruction of 
Church Street from Main Street to Middlesex Avenue; and completion of the 
third phase of the Woburn Street sidewalk project. Also in 2004 the town 
hired an engineering firm to prepare preliminary and final design plans for 
the reconstruction and improvement of the intersection of Glen Road and 
Middlesex Avenue. This intersection has long been identified as treacherous 
for motorists and pedestrians. The objective of this project is to improve 
the intersection without creating major impacts to abutting properties. 

High school athletes and recreational joggers alike will benefit from the 
newly reconstructed High School track. Construction of the town's newest 
athletic facility was completed this summer with the installation of a new 
rubberized track surface. In addition, new facilities were constructed for 
track and field events providing Wilmington with an attractive, safe and 
modern athletic complex. 

Thanks to a gift of $35,000 from the Wilmington Sons of Italy, the town's 
continued efforts to improve upon its playground offerings received a big 
boost. The organization's generosity enabled the construction of a new 
playground at the North Intermediate School. The playground was designed by 
the Engineering Department with the "expert" assistance of fourth and fifth 
grade students from the North Intermediate School. The town's newest 
playground meets all safety and handicapped-accessibility requirements and 
has been designed to accommodate expansion. 

The town continues to grapple with three critical environmental issues 
effecting the entire community. Town officials have placed a major focus on 
the cleanup of the Olin Chemical site, the capping of the Maple Meadow 
Landfill and the proposal by a New Jersey-based firm to construct and operate 
a reloading facility at the Olin site on Eames Street. Environmental 
consultants have been engaged to assist the town in monitoring remediation 
efforts undertaken by Olin under the supervision and direction of the State 
Department of Environmental Protection. Early in the year the town executed 
a Tolling Agreement with the Olin Corporation and prior owners of the Eames 
Street site. The agreement preserves the town's right to pursue claims 
against current and former owners of the property. The town, through its 
Water Department and its consultants, have been working with the State's 
environmental and planning agencies, along with the City of Woburn, to enable 
the construction of a piped connection to the MWRA water system that would 
serve as an available source of water. 



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All work at the Maple Meadow Landfill was ceased during calendar year 2004. 
The owner and the management firm conducting the landfill operation were 
obliged to discontinue operation at the site as a result of an order from the 
State Department of Environmental Protection. The town is currently engaged 
in a legal dispute with the landfill's owner and operator, both of whom 
oppose the town's determination to enforce the Zoning By-Law which limits the 
height of a landfill. 

At year's end, the town was enlisting the aid of state and industry officials 
in its efforts to block the development of a construction and demolition 
reload facility at the Olin site. For more than a year and a half, the town 
has mounted a strong challenge to the New England Transrail proposal which 
seeks an exemption from the United States Surface Transportation Board to 
operate as a rail carrier. The ever-expanding proposal, if approved, would 
allow for solid waste activities to be conducted without having to comply 
with standard siting approvals and regulatory oversight. A decision from the 
Surface Transportation Board is forthcoming. 

Efforts to improve the efficiency of the town's water and sewer operations 
continued in 2004. Most notably the Water Meter Replacement Program was 
completed. New remote read water meters are in place on all water services 
throughout the community. The installation of the new meters in conjunction 
with a new accounting software, allow for efficient processing of all bills 
without inconveniencing property owners . 

In 2004, there were 2,250 feet of water mains installed or replaced, the 
result of which will provide an increased water supply to homes, improved 
water quality and the assurance of adequate fire protection. The town 
continues to concentrate its efforts on reducing water consumption. The 
town's water production in 2004 amounted to 809 million gallons as opposed to 
940 million gallons produced in 2002. Additionally, the town was able to 
reduce its reliance on outside water purchases. In 2003 the town purchased 
nearly 95 million gallons of water from neighboring communities. This past 
year the town purchased less than 10 million gallons of water from outside 
sources . 

This past year the town also completed a comprehensive review of the entire 
sewer collection system. The review is intended to identify leaks in the 
system and structural deficiencies. Several repairs were made to eliminate 
groundwater from migrating into the sewer system. The successful completion 
of this project resulted in the removal of an estimated 180,000 gallons per 
day of inflow and infiltration. In addition the town now has an inventory of 
the entire system enabling the Water and Sewer Department to more accurately 
focus its efforts and funding on future repair and maintenance issues. 

The town makes a concerted effort to keep its residents informed of important 
issues and undertakings. The Annual Report is a compilation of detailed 
summaries of the activities undertaken by various departments, committees and 
officers of the town during calendar year 2004. In addition to the Annual 
Report, residents are provided with a number of other communication vehicles 
in which to gather information. Newsletters and informational calendars are 
produced by the Library, Recreation and Elderly Services Department. The 
town utilizes local newspapers and Wilmington's local cable access station to 
disseminate information. A town website is operational and a quarterly 
newsletter entitled, "Town Topics" is mailed to every property owner. 



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A review of the 2 004 Annual Report will reveal a number of noteworthy- 
accomplishments : 

• The town received an award from the Northeast Massachusetts Law 
Enforcement Council after hosting and taking a lead role in the 
establishment of a regional emergency planning effort to meet the 
impact of the Democratic National Convention. 

• The Police Department was among thirty- seven communities recognized 
with a safety award by AAA Southern New England. 

• The Police Department established a Police Canine Patrol Unit. 

• The town's Senior Citizen Work Program completed its tenth year of 
operation . 

• The community was awarded an $800,000 housing grant to enable 
continuation of the town's rehabilitation program. 

• The Library established the successful town-wide reading program. 

• A $100,000 grant to rehabilitate the historic West Schoolhouse was 
received from the Commonwealth. 

• A handicapped-accessible fishing pier at Silver Lake was constructed. 

• The town completed it's ten-year review and update of it's Inhabitant 
By-Laws . 

• Significant improvements in standard achievement testing were realized 
in the Wilmington schools. 

• Improvement and expansion of technology took place in the school 
department . 

• Record-setting participation occurred in Recreation, Elderly Services 
and Library programs . 

• The Boutell -Hathorn House was accepted by the National Park Service 
for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. 

Credit for these and other accomplishments is reserved for the taxpayers who 
enable the town to meet the needs of its residents; the volunteers and 
activists who labor unselfishly to improve Wilmington's quality of life; 
town officials who spend countless hours tackling problems and addressing 
constituent concerns; and town employees who labor to implement important 
policies and to provide vital services. 

In December of 2004, the town "kicked off" its 275th Anniversary celebration 
by hosting breakfast with Santa. It was fitting to begin the celebration of 
this historical milestone with a family program for "kids of all ages." This 
event, similar to the other programs planned by the hard-working Anniversary 
Committee, exemplifies the adopted slogan for this important year- long 
celebration, "Small Town, Big Family. " 

This past year the town formally recognized the lifetime of service provided 
to Wilmington by two individuals who personified, "Small Town, Big Family. " 
On a beautiful October morning, hundreds of friends, family members and 
admirers honored the memory of former Police Chief Paul Lynch. A bench at 
the Public Safety Building was dedicated in his name to serve as a lasting 
memorial to a beloved son of Wilmington. At a Selectmen's meeting in June, 
Dorothy Lafionatis, Historical Commission Member Emeritus was honored for her 
lifetime of dedication to preserving and promoting Wilmington's history. As 
I write this report on a snowy winter day, the town has just learned of her 
passing. The legacies of Chief Lynch and Dorothy Lafionatis will shine as a 
definiv,ion of citizenship for future generations. 



-9- 



Several residents concluded their service on town boards this past year. The 
town gratefully acknowledges the past service of Board of Appeals member 
Daniel Wandell, Jr.; Conservation Commissioners Jason Tildsley and Jolene 
Lewis; Finance Committee members William Dowd and Daniel Wandell and Florence 
Athanasia, a member of the Town of Wilmington Scholarship Fund Committee. 
Several talented chairpersons of important committees also relinquished their 
posts in 2004. Margaret Kane resigned as Chairman of the Board of Library 
Trustees following her election to the Wilmington School Committee. James 
Morris, a fixture at the head of the table for the Conservation Commission, 
stepped down following more than a decade of outstanding service and 
leadership. Jeanette Savage concluded her tenure as chairperson of the 
Recreation Commission and Fred Russell, who presided over Water and Sewer 
Commission meetings with professionalism and courtesy stepped down in 2004. 
Special thanks to Barry Mulholland, a member of the Finance Committee since 
1995 and its Chairman since 2001, for lending his expertise and guidance to 
ensuring the well-being of Wilmington's finances. I also acknowledge the 
valuable service of former Selectman Bob Palmer who concluded his term on the 
Board of Selectmen. His sound advice will be missed. 

The leadership in two important town departments changed hands in 2004. In 
May, Bernard Nally retired as Police Chief concluding an outstanding thirty- 
six year career as a law enforcement professional. In his place I appointed 
Deputy Police Chief Robert Spencer. Chief Spencer began his law enforcement 
career in Woburn in 1969 prior to his initial Wilmington assignment in 1973. 
He has proven to be an able and decisive Chief of Police, who along with the 
new Deputy Chief, Michael Begonis, brings strong leadership to their 
important command assignments. The town welcomed the return of Carole 
Hamilton to Wilmington town government. From 1982 to 1999, Carole served as 
a member and chairman of the Wilmington Planning Board. In August of this 
past year, she was appointed Director of Planning and Conservation, replacing 
the highly respected Lynn Duncan. Ms. Duncan led Wilmington's efforts in the 
areas of planning, affordable housing and community development for over 
thirteen years. She stepped down from her post to accept a similar position 
in Salem, Massachusetts. 

The "dean" of the Public Buildings Department, Al Antinarelli, retired as a 
carpenter following thirty-seven years of employment with the town. At the 
time of his retirement, Al was the longest serving employee on the municipal 
side of government. John Marsi, who worked more than thirty- four years in 
the Department of Public Works, retired as the Assistant Superintendent. The 
town also acknowledges the retirements of Public Buildings employee Marty 
Kutchler and DPW employee Pat D' Antonio, each of whom made valuable 
contributions to their departments. It is always difficult to lose a member 
of the Town Hall family. In 2004, William Harrison, the town's long serving 
and dedicated Plumbing and Gas Inspector, passed away. Bill was a fixture in 
Town Hall, beloved for his decency, honesty and civility. 

Each year I try to capture in this report what I refer to as the essence of 
Wilmington. It is quite often the description of an event or an occurrence 
that demonstrates the values and goodness of our community. Oftentimes it is 
an event born out of tragedy or sadness, but ultimately enriched by promise 
and hope. There is no better example of the essence of the Wilmington 
community then what took place on Sunday, June 13, 2004 when community 
members came together to pay tribute to the memory of Justin O'Neil. Justin, 
a high school junior, passed away suddenly in January of 2004 leaving behind 
a multitude of loving family and friends. One of Justin's many passions was 
skateboarding. A fundraising effort highlighted by a road race held in 



10- 




tribute to his memory raised in excess of $50,000 for the Justin O'Neil 
Memorial Skate Park Fund. Proceeds from the fund, along with a $50,000 
donation from long-time Wilmington benefactor, Milton Heffron and a $30,000 
town appropriation has enabled the Department of Public Works to construct a 
top-notch skate park which is located at the Shawsheen School. To the 
delight of children from throughout this community, the Park was opened in 
September of 2004 providing young people with a safe and modern facility to 
enjoy this popular activity. Plans are underway to name the Skate Park as a 
lasting memorial to Justin. As such, it will stand as a memorial to family 
values, the exuberance of youth, the importance of friendship and the 
inspiration found in a young person's zest for life. 

I am grateful for the opportunity to submit my fifteenth annual report as 
Wilmington's Town Manager and privileged to be a part of Wilmington's Small 
Town, Big Family. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 




Town Manager Michael Caira and members o{ his staff arc presented with the first place award in 
the Annual Massachusetts Municipal Association Town Report Contest. 



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i 



ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 



Towe Clerk • | 

The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer j 

and Local Registrar of Vital Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged | 

with the responsibility of ensuring that the appropriate process, with i 

notification and procedure, is adhered to in the making of legislative policy j 

and of managing public access to this information. This office is often the 1 

first door of government accessed by individuals seeking information and the j 
resolution of problems. It is with a sense of pride and accomplishment that 

we submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our citizens I 

well. I 

! 

The following information and vital statistics were recorded during 2004: 



Births 290 

Marriage Intentions 99 

Marriages 99 

Deaths 235 

Deaths - Out of State 23 

Burial Permits 151 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 43 



Flammable Permits and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town 
Clerk's office. Notice is sent to the owner or occupant of land where the 
storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal by April 30th of each 
year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's 
regulations, may result in revocation of the permit after a public hearing 
Sixty flammable permits were issued during the year. 



Permits & Recordings : 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 2 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 232 

Federal Lien Recordings 

Federal Lien Releases 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 331 

Pole & Conduit Locations 3 

Dog Licenses 1,402 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 6 



The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this 
capacity she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly 
meeting night, kept the minutes up to date and supervised all elections and 
the annual town census by mail. The Town Clerk's office also maintains 
current voting lists and registers voters during regular office hours. She 
also meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and 
to certify nomination papers for candidates. 



Town Meetings & Elections 2004: 
Presidential Primary 
Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
State Primary 
State Election 



March 2 
April 17 
April 24 
September 14 
November 2 



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Board of Registrars 

In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the 
Acts of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so 
posted in the Town Hall. The Board also met many times for certification of 
signatures on nomination papers and assisted at all elections and town 
meetings . 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32 and supervised the conduct of 
elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64 and Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 
63, all in accordance with the Town Charter and By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington Revised. 

The calendar year 2004 had a total of 15,048 registered voters from our 
listed 22,238 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank the 5,780 households that returned 
their town census forms in 2004. A true census is an asset to the town. 




Town Clerk Kay Scanlon accepts the ballot from a new voter. 



-13- 



Town Couosel 

1. Advice & Legal Documents . Advisory opinions were rendered to various 
town officials and boards relating to a wide variety of issues and 
subjects. Frequent and ongoing attention was given to reviewing and/or 
drafting by-laws, easements, public document requests, compliance with 
the State Ethics Act and Open Meeting Law, various town rules and 
regulations, and other legal documents. 

2. Contracting & Procurement . During the period of our involvement with 
the Town, we reviewed contracts and agreements and procurement 
documents . 

3. Pro j ects . We assisted the town in connection with the Olin property 
contamination issue and Maple Meadow Landfill, including obtaining an 
administrative warrant for inspection of the landfill, attention to 
height limit enforcement issues, attention to enforcement of the soil 
contamination by-law, New England Transrail proposals, water resource 
allocation plans, affordable housing initiatives, road acceptance 
issues, various real estate projects, easement issues, conservation and 
preservation restrictions and the Regency Place and Whispering Pines 
Comprehensive Permits. 

4. Labor. Our labor specialists provided advice to the town on various 
personnel issues . 

5. Miscellaneous . On a regular basis, we provided advice to the Board of 
Selectmen, the Town Manager, Water and Sewer Commission and various 
other public officials regarding a variety of matters. These issues 
included conflicts of interest, open meeting law and procedure, land 
use and zoning, procurement and competitive bid procedures, and the 
enforcement of laws and regulations. This office has continued the 
pursuit of claims against several taxpayers, for outstanding excise, 
real estate and personal property taxes, as well as outstanding water 
and sewer charges, owed to the town (see also Litigation below) . 

6 . Litigation . 

As of December 31, 2004, there was a total of 38 lawsuits and claims 
pending of which we have been informed: 

6 lawsuits involving the Board of Appeals: 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 
179451 . 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Land Court, Misc. No. 179448. 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516. 

Scott Garrant, James Diorio, Kevin Brander, Michael Sorrentino and Ann 
Yurek as they are members of the Wilmington Planning Board v. Charles 
E. Boyle, John R. Forest, Dan Wandell, Jr. as they are members of the 
Wilmington Board of Appeals and Mark Nelson, individually , Land Court 
Docket No. 267499. 

Mass. Environmental Associates, Inc. v. Board of Appeals et al . Land 
Court Misc. No. 304625. 

Clarence Spinazola 1994 Revocable Trust v. Board of Appeals et al . , 
Land Court Misc. No. 304646. 



-14- 




4 lawsuits involving the Planning Board: 

Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning 
Board , Land Court, Misc. No. 192780. 

Robert Troy v. Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington , Land Court 
Misc. No. 274810. 

Mark D. Nelson v. Town of Wilmington et al . Land Court Misc. Case No. 
284416 . 

Presidential Development Corporation et al v. Wilmington Planning Board 
et al . , Middlesex Superior Court Docket No. 03-1966 

1 lawsuit involving the Board of Health: 

Joanne M. Cuoco, et al v. Gregory Erickson, et al , Woburn District 
Court #945CV1090. 

1 lawsuit involving the Board of Selectmen: 

James F. Murphy and William T. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesesx 
Superior Court No. 99-1333. 

2 lawsuits involving the Police Department: 

Mark D. Nelson v. Robert N. Stewart, Chief of Police, et al . , Middlesex 
Superior Court No. 04-2759. 

Mark D. Nelson v. Bernard P. Nally, Chief of Police et al . , Mass. 
Appeals Court Docket No. 2004-P-577 

1 lawsuit involving the Water and Sewer Commission: 

Wilmington v. Department of Environmental Protection , DEP Document No. 
2003-074 

5 lawsuits involving the Tax Collector: 

Town of Wilmington v. Jamcorp , District Court Docket No. 
200253CV001151 . 

Town of Wilmington v. JZK, Inc. , District Court Docket No. 
200253CV001152 . 

Town of Wilmington v. Burnham Service Company, Inc. , District Court 
Docket No. 200253CV001153 . 

Town of Wilmington v. Axis Systems, Inc. , District Court Docket No. 
200253CV001154 . 

Town of Wilmington v. Aurora Imaging Technology, Inc. , District Court 
Docket No. 200253CV001155 . 

3 lawsuits involving the Town Administration: 

Richard Howlett and the Town of Wilmington (Charge of Discrimination) , 
MCAD #04BEM03246 EEOC #16CA500366 

Patrick v. Luciano , Middlesex Superior Court Docket No. 03-03182 
Richard Howlett vs. Town of Wilmington, DET Docket # 374928 



-15- 



2 appeals involving the Conservation Commission: 

Town of Wilmington v. Scarano , DEP Administrative Appeal Docket No. 
2003-167 

Olin V. Wilmington , DEP Administrative Appeal, DEP No. 344-733 
1 lawsuit involving the Building Inspector: 

Doucette v. Wilmington Building Inspector , Middlesex Sup Ct , C.A. No. 
00-00901 

12 claims which are not yet lawsuits: 
Hayes v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) 

Breslin v. Town of Wilmington (School Department) 
D'Arcangelo v. Town of Wilmington (School Department) 
Ciampa v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) 
Cote v. Town of Wil.mington (DPW) 
Gagnon v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) 
Gamst V. Town of Wilmington (DPW) 

Department of Environmental Protection v. Town of Wilmington, Maple 
Meadow Landfill/Clarence Spinnazola 

Town of Wilmington v. Olin Chemical Corporation 

Burns V. Town of Wilmington (DPW) 

Moccia V. Wilmington (DPW) 

Sheehan v. Wilmington (Police) 

Each of the above efforts required the participation of numerous town 
officials and private citizen volunteers - all working together towards a 
better Wilmington. 

Thanks to the Board of Selectmen and all other town officials and citizens 
for their cooperation and assistance towards another successful year. 



Newly appointed 
Police Chief 
Robert Spencer 
is sworn into office by 
Town Clerk Kay Scanlon. 




-16- 




ssessors 



RECAPITULATION - 2 05 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriation 

Special Education 

County Retirement Assessment 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 

Air Pollution Districts 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Mosquito Control Project 

Amount Certified by Collector & 
Treasurer for Tax Title 

Overlay of Current Year 

Cherry Sheet Offsets 

M. W.R.A 

Final Court Judgments 
RMV Surcharge 
Miscellaneous 

Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

2004 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Penalties and Interest on Taxes 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Charges for Services - Sewer 

Other Charges for Services 

Fees 

Rentals 

Departmental Revenue - Library 

Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 

Other Department Revenue 

Licenses and Permits 

Special Assessments 

Fines and Forfeits 

Investment Income 

Voted from Available Funds 

Free Cash 

Miscellaneous 



$59, 630, 327 . 00 



. 00 

2,215, 979.00 
407,419.00 
6, 069 . 00 
5, 706 . 00 
37, 962 . 00 

. 00 
700, 000 . 00 
45,485 . 00 
. 00 
. 00 
13 , 000 . 00 
24, 762 . 00 



$8,299, 
3,450, 
230, 
620, 
2, 179, 
210 , 
70, 
11, 
16, 
60, 
330, 
330, 
1, 
153, 
374, 
768, 
2, 225, 
159, 



803 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
164 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
500 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
000 . 00 
980 . 00 
508 . 00 
000 . 00 
709 . 00 



3 , 456, 382 . 00 
$63 , 086,709. 00 



$19, 488, 664 . 00 



Real Estate 

Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



$2,483,827,545.00 ® 9.77 p/t 
$ 108,468,955.00 @ 26.80 p/t 
$ 562,676,900.00 @ 26.80 p/t 
$ 50,161,970.00 @ 26.80 p/t 



$24 , 266, 995 . 00 
2, 906, 968.00 
15, 079, 741 . 00 
1, 344 ,341.00 

$43, 598, 045 . 00 



-17- 



Treasurer/ Collector 



Commitments 



2005 Preliminary Real Estate 

2004 Real Estate 

2005 Preliminary Personal Property 
2004 Personal Property 

2004 Excise 
2003 Excise 
Ambulance 

Apportioned Water Betterments 
Interest 

Apportioned Street Betterments 
Interest 

Apportioned Sewer Betterments 

Interest 

Sewer Liens 

Water Liens 

Electric Liens 

Apportioned Title 5 Betterments 

Interest 

Total 



$20, 675, 
$40, 619, 
814 , 
1, 594, 
3,379, 
133, 
651, 



31, 
43 , 
56, 
215, 
30, 
3 , 
3, 



347 .29 
010 .26 
749 . 23 
337 . 15 
634 . 95 
212 . 12 
333 .51 
231.80 

27 . 07 

348 . 56 
209 . 14 
706 . 86 
813 . 80 
410 .88 
486 . 98 
676 .40 
719.35 
643 . 67 



$68,253,899.02 



Collections 
Real Estate 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Water Betterments 

Street Betterments 

Sewer Betterments 

Title V Betterments 

Water Liens 

Sewer Liens 

Electric Liens 

Excise Interest and Charges 

Ambulance 

Lien Certificates 

Water Collections 

Sewer Collections 

Real Estate Interest & Charges 

Personal Property Interest & Charges 

Tax Titles 

Tax Title Interest 

Total 



$41, 342, 
1,459, 
3,235, 



62, 
7, 
202, 
49, 
29, 
106, 
339, 
36, 
3, 145, 
2, 070, 
91, 
13, 
280, 
24 , 



175 . 60 
154 . 70 
013 .20 
463 . 62 
697 . 13 
793 . 22 
438 . 70 
089 . 59 
818 .39 
002 . 83 
317 . 39 
423 . 02 
604 .28 
737.48 
195 .25 
458 .59 
232 . 93 
540 . 16 
730 . 52 



$52,496, 886.60 



-18 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of Wilmington for 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 2004 are hereby submitted. This report was prepared 
by the Office of the Town Accountant. Responsibility for accuracy of the data and 
the completeness and fairness of the presentation, including all disclosures, rests 
with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate in all 
material respects and are reported in a manner designed to present fairly the 
financial position and results of operations of the various funds and account groups 
of the government . 



Respectfully submitted. 



Micfhael Morris 
Town Accountant 




-19- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



Table of Contents 



Combined Balance Sheet-All Fund Types and Account Groups 
Notes to Financial Statements 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances -All Governmental Fund 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet-Special Revenue 
Accounts 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balance-Special Revenue Accounts 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity-General Fund 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Water Department 
Fund 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Capital Projects 
Fund 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 
Schedule of Trust Funds 



-20- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



Assets 



General 



Total 

Special Capital Trusts Long-Term (Memorandum 
Revenue Projects Agency Debt Only) 



Cash 

Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 675,139.40 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions (1,195,450.25) 

Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



10,105,420.72 4,605,919.26 213,488.98 1,283,819.71 



351,500.26 
460,309.70 
712,264.74 
351,372.48 
802,369.70 

174,621.83 251,155.82 
193,292.51 



16,208,648,67 

675,139.40 
(1,195,450.25) 
351,500.26 
460,309.70 
712,264.74 
351,372.48 
802,369.70 
425,777.65 
193,292.51 

28,780,375.00 28,780,375.00 



Total Assets 



12,437,548.58 5,050,367.59 213,488.98 1,283,819.71 28,780,375.00 47,765,599.1 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings 



558,145.27 264,016.59 

675,139.40 

2,852,438.71 444,448.33 

6,834.64 



9,543.97 831,705.83 

675,139.40 
3,296,887.04 
28,780,375.00 28,780,375.00 
6,834.64 



Total Liabilities 



4,092,558.02 708,464.92 



0.00 



9,543.97 28,780,375.00 33,590,941.91 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



1,362,973.73 826,689.19 
2,761,705.48 
2,225,000.00 753,508.00 
4,757,016.83 



213,488.98 1,259,275.74 
15,000.00 



2,189,662.92 
4,234,470.20 

2,993,508.00 
4,757,016.83 



Total Fund Balance 



8,344,990.56 4,341,902.67 213,488.98 1,274,275.74 



0.00 14,174,657.95 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 12,437,548.58 5,050,367.59 213,488.98 1,283,819.71 28,780,375.00 47,765,599.86 



-21- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 2004 



1 . Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is governed by an elected Board of 
Selectmen and an open Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen appoint a Town 
Manager who in accordance with Chapter 592 of 1950, serves as chief fiscal 
and administrative officer of the town. Other town officials are appointed 
by the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. Generally accepted 
accounting principles (GAAP) requires that the accompanying general purpose 
financial statements present the Town of Wilmington (the primary government) 
and its component units. Component units are included in the Town's 
reporting entity if their operational and financial relationships with the 
Town are significant. Pursuant to this criteria, the following entities have 
been excluded from the accompanying general purpose financial statements: 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly 
as well as subsidizing low income housing units. 

Middlesex County Retirement System - provides county government 
and various services for member communities. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District - provides education services for member communities. 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee - provides facilities for waste 
disposal for its members. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage 
disposal services. 

2 . Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local 
governmental units except as indicated in Note 3 . The following is a summary 
of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds 
and one account group in order to comply with the limitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types as follows: 

Governmental Funds 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating 
fund of the town. It is used to account for all financial 
resources except those required to be accounted for in another 
fund . 

Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to 
account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other 
than expendable trust or major capital projects) that are legally 
restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to 
account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or 
construction of major capital facilities. 

Fiduciary Funds 



-22- 



Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets held by the town in a trustee capacity or as 
an agent for individuals, private organizations, other 
governments and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, 
non-expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust 
funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic 
measurements of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net 
income in order to demonstrate maintenance of capital . 
Expendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially the same 
manner as governmental funds . Agency funds are custodial in 
nature (assets equal liabilities) and do not involve measurement 
of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities 
expected to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated 
in the general long-term debt group of accounts. This account 
group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the measurement 
of financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

B . Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
incurred . 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they 
become available. Available means then due or past due and 
receivable within the current period or expected to be collected 
soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the 
current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to 
intergovernmental revenues, the legal and contractual 
requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as 
guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of these 
revenues. In one, moneys must be expended on the specific 
purpose or project before any amounts will be paid to the town. 
Therefore, revenues are recognized based upon the expenditures 
recorded. In the other, moneys are virtually unrestricted as to 
purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure 
to comply with prescribed compliance requirements. These 
resources are reflected as revenues at the time of receipt or 
earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a 
cash disbursement basis. In addition, as required by 
Massachusetts General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen 
days immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable 
and expenses as of June 3 0th. 

Purchase orders and other contractual obligations 
outstanding at June 30th related to annual operating expenses are 
recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, as a reservation of 
fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is 
measurable but not available has been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 3 0th. 



Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase 
orders, contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of 
funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of the 
applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. 
Open encumbrances at year-end are reported as reservations of 
fund balances. Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or 
liabilities . 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are 
recorded as expenditures when purchased (purchase method) . 

General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental funds. The town does not 
capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a general fixed 
asset account group, which is consistent with the practice of 
many municipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C . Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned 
Memorandum Only to indicate that they are presented only to 
facilitate financial analysis. Data in these columns do not 
present financial position, results of operations or changes in 
financial position in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles. Such data is not comparable to a 
consolidation since interfund eliminations have not been made. 

D . Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Contributory 
Retirement System, a single employer plan, established under 
Chapter 32 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Substantially all full-time and some part-time 
employees of the town except teachers and certain administrative 
personnel employed by the School Department participate in the 
system. Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as retirement 
allowance, include both an annuity portion, funded principally 
from amounts contributed by the participants, and a pension 
portion funded by the town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of employment. 
The employer contribution by the town as determined by the 
County's actuarial valuation normal cost plus the amortization of 
the original unfunded actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. 
Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, and therefore, the town does not contribute to 
the plan. 

3 . Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 



-24- 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with 
Chapter 32 of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (see 
note ID) . 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases is made rather than being 
capitalized in a general fixed asset group of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at time of purchase. 

4 . Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All 
financial orders are initiated or recommended at Town meetings. Expenditures 
are limited to the line items as voted at the Town meetings. Department 
heads may not transfer, without approval, appropriation balances from one 
expenditure account to another within their department or budget. These 
along with transfers or unencumbered appropriation balances between 
departments or agencies must be approved at Town Meetings . 

5 . Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 
5% of its equalized valuation. Debt issued in accordance with this 
state law is designated as being inside the debt limit. In addition, 
however, a town may authorize debt in excess of that limit for specific 
purposes. Such debt when issued is designated as being outside the 
debt limit. The following summarized the annual debt service 
requirements as of June 30, 2004. 



General Obligation Bonds 



Principal Interest Total 



Outstanding June 30, 2003 $27,395,000 $6,154,438 $33,549,438 

Retirements $ 3,425,000 $1, 344 , 063 $ 4 , 769, 063 

Outstanding June 30, 2004 $23,970,000 $4,810,375 $28,780,375 

As of June 30, 2004 the town had authorized and unissued debt of 
$1,430,000 as outlined below. 

Lowell Street Sewer Project $ 1,430,000 

$ 1,430,000 



-25- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BAU^NCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 



REVENUES 
General Properly Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Ctiarges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Appropriation Refunds 
Gifts 
Otfier 

Total Revenues 

EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Works 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Chiarges 
Capital Outlay 
Warrant Articles 

Total Expenditures 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 












Fiduciary 










Fund Types 


Total 


General 


Special 


uapiiai 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




Revenue 


Projects 


Trust 


Only) 


'fi,/ iz,uoo 0/ 


n nn 
u uu 






41,712,058 87 


0R1 7QC 04 
ZD 1 , / 00 








464,136 03 




ZJ,01 1 OZ 






150,260 94 


3,059,77473 


000 






3,059,77473 


221 ,253 84 


0,00 






221,253 84 


304,014 25 


00 




32,910 80 


336,925 05 


8,307,140 76 


2,285,88845 




815 56 


10,593,844 77 


2,206,965 81 


6,030,644,99 




765,478.37 


9,003,089 17 


152,777 60 


000 






152,777 60 


54,123 77 


00 






54,123 77 


258,61 1 34 


5,948 65 




14,356 47 


278,91646 


356,250,08 


8,929 34 






365,179 42 


000 


165,937 94 




151,861 11 


317,799 05 


1 ,268,547 66 


759,570 10 




2,140,41415 


4,168,531 91 




AiXO 70-1 7Q 


u uu 


3,105,836 46 


70,878,671 61 


^ A QQQ QQ 


1 D,oUU / 




90,012 39 


1,621.702 15 


C A Q7 QCO AO 




o1 ,ZDD 4U 


722,745 89 


7,188,904 00 


893,875,19 


45,064 35 




8,399 98 


947,339 52 


5,357,12895 


2,650,682 14 




15,700 00 


8,023,511 09 


652,459 80 


393,907 92 




3,755 00 


1,050,122 72 


3,047,650 53 


10,211 70 




58,11051 


3,115,972 74 


26,532,555,73 


3,567,865 00 


6,820 50 


184,047 70 


30,291,288 93 


94,438 90 


646,565 73 






741,004 63 


15,657 13 


000 




137 53 


15,794 66 


4,957,507 41 


00 






4,957,507 41 


7,021,951 88 


20,218 29 




1,946,697 09 


8,988,867 26 


4,294,438 44 


000 






4,294,438 44 


436,762 92 


1,602,339 61 






2,039,102 53 


20,084 58 


00 






20,084 58 



II 



61,027,262 92 9,200,684 75 



38,086.90 3,029,60609 



73,295,640 66 



Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 



(2,737,209 55) 282,097 03 (38,086 90) 76,230 37 (2,416,969 05) 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
State and County Ctiarges 



520,523 00 
(14,000 00) 



00 
(505,523 00) 



14,000 00 



(15,000 00) 



000 
534,523 00 
(534,523 00) 

0.00 



Total Ottier Financing Sources (Uses) 


506,523 00 


(505,523 00) 


14,000 00 


(15,000 00) 


00 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Othier Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other Uses 


(2,230,686.55) 


(223,425 97) 


(24,086 90) 


61,230 37 


(2,416,969 05) 


Fund Balance July 1 , 2003 


10,600,465 50 


4,565,328,64 


237,57588 


1,213,045 37 


16,616,41539 


Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 


(24,788 39) 








(24,788.39) 


Fund Balance June 30, 2004 


8,344,990 56 


4,341 ,902 67 

-26- 


213,488 98 


1 ,274,275 74 


14,174,657 95 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



Assets 



Grants 



Gifts 



Reserved for 
Appropriation 



Revolving Water 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 

Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions 

Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



1,018,418.46 191,648.40 



468,350.71 748,227.26 2,179,274.43 4,605,919.26 



193,292.51 



251,155.82 



0.00 
251,155.82 
193,292.51 



Total Assets 



1,211,710.97 191,648.40 



468,350.71 748,227.26 2,430,430.25 5,050,367.59 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 132,613.56 
Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 

Other Accounts Receivable 1 93,292.51 

Notes Payable 
Payroll Withholdings 



21,712.71 109,690.32 264,016.59 



251,155.82 444,448.33 



Total Liabilities 



325,906.07 0.00 



0.00 21,712.71 360,846.14 708,464.92 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



885,804.90 191,648.40 



826,689.19 

208,350.71 726,514.55 749,386.92 
260,000.00 493,508.00 



826,689.19 
2,761,705.48 
753,508.00 
0.00 



Total Fund Balance 



885,804.90 191,648.40 



468,350.71 726,514.55 2,069,584.11 4,341,902.67 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 1,211,710.97 191,648.40 



468,350.71 748,227.26 2,430,430.25 5,050,367.59 



-27- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 





Grants 


Gifts 


Reserved for 
Appropriation 


Revolving 
Funds 


Water 


Total 


REVENUES 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges for Sen/ices 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Appropriation Refunds 
Gifts 
Ottier 


2,146,663 16 

2,922.87 

91,388.89 


134,658.16 


3,025.78 
85,203 84 


22>ioi bl 

139,225 29 
2,714,777 01 

31,279 78 
128,689 38 


202,350 79 
623 85 

3,315,867 98 

8,929 34 
454,287 99 


00 
202,350 79 
23,511 52 
000 
0.00 
000 
2,285,888 45 
6,030,644 99 
000 
000 
5.948.65 
8,929 34 
165,937 94 
759,570 10 


Total Revenues 


2,240,97492 


134,658 16 


88,229 62 


3,036,859 13 


3,982,059 95 


9,482.781 78 


EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Works 
Community Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Ctiarges 
Capital Outlay 
Warrant Articles 


16,128 78 
235,25257 

31 ,954 67 
321,102 87 
351,421.65 

1,273,195 13 
20,21829 


11,776.66 
3,071 15 


2,766 00 


67200 

10,038 53 
77,919 58 
42,48627 
10,211 70 
2,294,669 87 
646,565 73 


2,248,893 69 
1,602.339 61 


16,800 78 
247,029 23 
45,064 35 
2.650,682 14 
393,907 92 
10,211 70 
3,567.865 00 
646,565 73 
000 
000 
20.218 29 
000 
1,602,339 61 

U UU 


Total Expenditures 


2,249,273 96 


14,847.81 


2,766 00 


3,082,563 68 


3,851,233 30 


9,200,684 75 


Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 


(8,299 04) 


119,810,35 


85,463 62 


(45,704 55) 


130,826 65 


282,097 03 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 

Operating Transfers Out 
State and County Ctiarges 






(35,000 00) 




(470,523.00) 


000 
00 
(505,523 00) 
000 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


000 


000 


(35,000 00) 


000 


(470.523 00) 


(505,523 00) 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other Uses 


(8,299 04) 


119,810 35 


50,463 62 


(45,704 55) 


(339,696 35) 


(223,42597) 


Fund Balance July 1 , 2003 


894,103.94 


71,838 05 


417.887 09 


772,219 10 


2.409.280 46 


4.565.328 64 


Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 














Fund Balance June 30, 2004 


885,804 90 


191,648 40 


468,350 71 


726,514 55 


2,069,584.11 


4.341.902 67 



-28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




CARRY FORWARD 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 2003 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


TO FISCAL 2005 


FISCAL 2004 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
















Selectmen 


Salaries 


0.00 


3,600.00 


3,600.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


OClcOUIICII 












U.UU 








0.00 


17,650.00 


17,504.75 


145.25 


0.00 


145.25 


Elections 


Salaries 


0.00 


20,719.00 


14,811.40 


5,907.60 


0.00 


5,907.60 


Elections 


Constable 


u.uo 


lOU.UU 


H cn nn 
lOU.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


A An 

0.00 


A An 

0.00 


Elections 


Expenses 


0.00 


3,600.00 


3,385.46 


214.54 


0.00 


214.54 






0.00 


24,469.00 


18,346.86 


6,122.14 


0.00 


6,122.14 


Registrars 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,825.00 


1,825.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


0.00 


5,250.00 


5,025.16 


224.84 


0.00 


224.84 






u.uu 




D.oOU.lD 


Zz4.o4 


n nn 
U.UU 




Finance Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,200.00 


857.46 


342.54 


0.00 


342.54 


Finance Comm. 


Expenses 


0.00 


7,695.00 


7,340.00 


355.00 


0.00 


355.00 






0.00 


8,895.00 


8,197.46 


697.54 


0.00 


697.54 


Town Manager 


Sal-Town Manager 


0.00 


106,567.97 


106,567.97 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


278,595.08 


278,595.08 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


0.00 


66,388.00 


65,158.41 


1,229.59 


0.00 


1,229.59 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


937.00 


63.00 


0.00 


63.00 




0.00 


452,551.05 


451,258.46 


1,292.59 


0.00 


1,292.59 


Town Accountant 


Sal-Town Accountant 


0.00 


77,382.23 


"7"7 OOO T5 

77,382.23 


0.00 


A An 

0.00 


A AA 

0.00 


Town Accountant 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


180,270.47 


180,270.47 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 


19,612.57 


2,450.00 


1,833.19 


20,229.38 


19,802.79 


426.59 






19,612.57 


260,102.70 


259,485.89 


20,229.38 


19,802.79 


426.59 


Treas/Collector 


Sal-Treasurer/Collector 


0.00 


63,109.08 


d A f\r\ AO 

63,109.08 


0.00 


0.00 


A AA 
U.UU 


Treas/Collector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


121,715.00 


121,086.50 


628.50 


0.00 


628.50 


Treas/Collector 


Expenses 


1,058.15 


20,525.00 


21,583.15 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Amt. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


0.00 


20,000.00 


18,826.08 


1,173.92 


0.00 


1,173.92 






1,058.15 


226,849.08 


226,104.81 


1,802.42 


0.00 


1,802.42 


Town Clerk 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


64,810.65 


64,810.65 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


91,374.29 


91,374.29 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


u.uu 


CQc nn 


n cQC nn 


/n nn\ 
(U.UU) 


n nn 
U.UU 


/n nn\ 
(U.UU) 






0.00 


158,819.94 


158,819.94 


(0.00) 


0.00 


(0.00) 




Sal-Prin A^^pssor 


0.00 


81,273.88 


81,273.88 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


71,320.88 


71,320.88 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Expenses 


35,088.69 


122,700.00 


80,284.14 


77,504.55 


59,471.15 


18,033.40 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






35,088.69 


275,294.76 


232,878.90 


77,504.55 


59,471.15 


18,033.40 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


9,400.00 


126,041.75 


135,441.75 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






9,400.00 


126,041,75 


135,441.75 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Permanent Bid Com 


Salaries 


0.00 


650.00 


0.00 


650.00 


0.00 


650.00 


Pemianent Bid Com 


Expenses 


0.00 


100.00 


0.00 


100.00 


0.00 


100.00 




0.00 


750.00 


0.00 


750.00 


0.00 


750.00 


General Government Subtotal 




827,710.59 


1,558,498.28 


1,514,888.98 


108,768.71 


79,273.94 


29,494.77 



-29- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



l"l Ik l/^TI/^k 1 i A /^Tl \ IIT\/ 

FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




CARRY FORWARD 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 2003 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 

1 IvJwr^^ tUU^ 


FISCAL 2004 

1 lOV^r^L £UU^ 


TO FISCAi POOS 

1 w 1 io\^m- ^uuu 




D| IDI \r Q4PPTV' 
















Police 


Colon/ Phiaf 

oaiary-uniei 


n nn 


Hco OCA nn 
l3j,jD't.UU 


Too, 004. UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


A AA 

0.00 


Polic© 


Qal Pian Phiof 


u.uu 


CO CRT CC 
00,000.00 


K7 A'kA IP. 
0/ ,404.1 D 


1 99R Rn 
1 ,ZZo.OU 


n nn 
u.uu 


1 99fl fln 
1,ZZ0.0U 


Police 


Col 1 Iai if 

oai.-Lieui. 


U.UU 




1 9C 71 y1 Q>l 


n An 

u.uu 


A AA 

U.UU 


A AA 
U.OO 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


323,202.60 


323,202.60 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,516,934.74 


1,516,934.74 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Clerical 


0.00 


82,116.80 


82,116.80 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


odi-ran 1 iiTie 


n nn 


n nn 
u.uu 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


A An 
U.UU 


A AA 

U.UU 


Police 


Col Cill In Prtetc 

oai.-riii in uosis 


n nn 
u.uu 


97K nin nn 

i( D,U lU.UU 


971 '?fi1 t; 
Zi 1,00 I.Oo 


A P/fl Pf; 
4,040.00 


n nn 
U.UU 


A CAQ CC 

4,d40.dO 


Police 


oai.-ra.noiiaays 


n nn 
u.uu 


QT CQ1 nn 

30,03 1 .uu 


09 m 71; 
3^,001.(0 


1 mo 9R 
1,003.^0 


n nn 
U.UU 


1 ICQ 9C 

1,003.<:0 


Police 


oai.-opeciaiisi 


n nn 
u.uu 


1 nnn nn 

l/,UUU.UU 


1 9 nnn nn 

IZ.UUU.UU 


n nn 
u.uu 


A AA 

u.uu 


A AA 

U.UU 


Police 


oai.-incenuve 


n nn 
u.uu 


in7 Ain 7*; 

OU/ ,44U./ J 


007 AAC\ 7*; 
OU/ ,44U./0 


n nn 
u.uu 


n nn 
u.uu 


A An 
u.uu 


Police 


Col Minht niff 


n nn 
u.uu 


An OQQ on 
4U,03o.0U 


4n iQfl fln 

4U.030.0U 


n nn 
U.UU 


A AA 

u.uu 


A AA 

U.UU 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


n nn 
U.uu 


1D,14i.4D 


•IP 1/9 >i*; 
1D,14Z.4D 


n nn 
U.UU 


A AA 
U.UU 


A nn 
U.UU 


Police 




1,344.56 


1Q1 ?17 00 

13 1,^1/ .UU 


176 567 86 

1 1 \J,\JKi 1 .UU 


15 993 70 

1 ^,33u. / U 


564.33 


IS 429 "^7 

1 U,H^3.vJ 1 








0,iUD,030.D4 


1 ifl*\ nin fln 

0,100, U1U.0U 


91 9in /n 
<:0,ZOU.4U 


C.PA 11 
004.00 


99 RRCi n7 


rire uepi. 


oai.-umei 


n nn 
u.uu 


Qc 997 99 


QC 997 99 


n nn 
u.uu 


A nn 
U.UU 


n AA 
u.uu 


Fire Dept. 


oai.-uep. uniei 


U.uu 


7Q j(C7 no 
/ 0,40/ .UO 


70 >ic7 no 
/ 0,40/ .Uo 


n nA 

u.uu 


A AA 

0.00 


A AA 
U.OU 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Lieut. 


0.00 


312,061.91 


312,061.91 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Privates 


0.00 


1,497,477.57 


1,497,477.57 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


41,637.03 


41,637.03 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


rire Ucpi. 


Col Dort Tima 

oai.-ran i ime 


n nn 
u.uu 


I0,40D.UU 


11 919 Qt; 

1 1 X IZ.3J 


9 949 n<; 

/i,/;4^:.U0 


n nn 
u.uu 


9 949 A*; 
Z,Z4Z.U0 


nre uepi. 


oai.-uvertirne uosis 


n nn 
u.uu 


OQn *;n7 ii 
zyu.DUi .0 1 


9Qn *;n7 'ii 
Z3U,jU/ .01 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 
u.uu 


A An 
u.uu 


Fire Dept. 


bai.-ru.noiioays 


n nn 
U.UU 


lU4, 100.04 


in/ 1 QQ o/ 
iU4,loo.04 


A AA 

U.UU 


A AA 

U.uu 


A AA 

U.OO 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-lncentive/EMT 


0.00 


14,075.00 


14,075.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Fire Alanm 


0.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


17,400.00 


15,958.43 


1,441.57 


0.00 


1,441.57 


Fire Dept. 


Expenses 


10,705.00 


4f\A oon nn 

104,320.00 


<i -1 "1 oon on 

111,229.39 


3,795.61 


347.84 


3,447.77 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip. 


3,692.59 


0.00 


cno cn 

3,692.59 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






14,397.59 


2,569,816.46 


2,576,734.82 


7,479.23 


347.84 


7,131.39 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Full Time 


0.00 


336,233.59 


336,233.59 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Overtime 


A nn 
0.00 


A1 ion nc 


JO oQn nc 


n nn 


n nn 
0.00 


n nn 

0.00 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Part Time 


0.00 


10b. Ob 


lUo.&b 


A AA 
U.UU 


n nn 
U.OO 


n nn 
000 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Expenses 




nnn nn 


11 QiR i;7 

10,310.0/ 


fl 1 99 /9 


n nn 
U.UU 








6,037.99 


395,720.20 


393,635.77 


8,122.42 


0.00 


8,122.42 


Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


29,887.60 


29,887.60 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


nlllllldl OOllUOl 


Expenses 


7n7 

/ U( .oo 


A "ioc, nn 

4,0/:o.UU 


z.oyj.'ty 




CAn nn 
04U.UU 


■1 7Qfl d/I 

1 , / yo.o4 






7n7 '^'5 
/ U( .JO 


14 9 1 9 cn 
04, Z IZ.DU 


jz.'to 1 .uy 




RAO nn 

D4U.UU 


1 7Qfl AA 

1 ,/yo.o4 


Public Safety Subtotal 




22,487.47 


o/\o A r /\f\ 

6,206,645.90 


6,187,862.48 


A 4 0'7A on 

41,270.89 


1,552.17 


39,718.72 


PUBLIC WQRKb: 
















Engineering 


Salaries 


n f\t\ 

0.00 


178,667.00 


1/0,^60.1:0 


Anc 7C 

3,406.75 


0.00 


>IAC 7C 

3,406.75 


Engineering 


Salaries-Part Time 


0.00 


7,200.00 


3,904.00 


3,296.00 


0.00 


3,296.00 


Engineering 


Expenses 


0.00 


8,700.00 


8,211.65 


488.35 


0.00 


488.35 






0.00 


194,567.00 


187,375.90 


7,191.10 


0.00 


7,191.10 


Highway Division 


Sal-D.P.W. Supt 


0.00 


85,290.47 


85,290.47 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


1,076,510.84 


1,076,510.84 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint. Sal. 


0.00 


4,740.00 


0.00 


4,740.00 


0.00 


4,740.00 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint. Exp. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


986.30 


13.70 


0.00 


13.70 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


13,816.65 


283,700.00 


289,552.62 


7,964.03 


4,309.99 


3,654.04 


Highway Division 


Road Machinery Exp. 


0.00 


68,000.00 


66,989.26 


1,010.74 


0.00 


1,010.74 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




CARRY FORWARD 
FROM FY 2003 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 2004 


EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL 2004 


BALANCE 
FISCAL 2004 


CARRY FORWARD 
TO FISCAL 2005 


CLOSE 
FISCAL 2004 


Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 
Drainage Projects 
Public Street Lights 
Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

0.00 


161,980.00 
33,000.00 

188,736.94 
31 100 00 


161,980.00 
32,840.75 

181,235.75 
28 785 13 


0.00 
159.25 
7,501.19 
2,314.87 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

n nn 


0.00 
159.25 
7,501.19 






13,816.65 


1,934,058.25 


1,924,171.12 


23,703.78 


4,309.99 


19,393.79 


Snow & Ice Control 
Snow & Ice Control 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
903.00 


159,582.93 
278,160.24 


159,582.93 
275 261 78 


0.00 
3 801 46 


0.00 

n nn 


0.00 






903.00 


437,743.17 


434,844.71 


3,801.46 


0.00 


3,801.46 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


113,367.82 


2,029,600.00 


2,013,007.34 


129,960,48 


129,960.48 
izy,you.4o 


(0.00) 

/n Ckrw 
(U.UU) 


Tree Division 
Tree Division 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 

0.00 


126,304.02 
9,395.00 


126,190.52 
8,312.61 


113.50 
1,082.39 


0.00 

0.00 


113.50 

1,082.39 






0.00 


135,699.02 


134,503.13 


1,195.89 


0.00 


1,195.89 


Parks & Grounds Division 
Parks & Grounds Division 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 

0.00 


286,753.77 
41,900.00 


286,753.77 
41,862.59 


0.00 
37.41 


0.00 

0.00 


0.00 
37.41 






0.00 


328,653.77 


328,616.36 


37.41 


0.00 


37.41 


Cemetery Division 
Cemetery Division 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


140,535.37 
17,750.00 


140,535.37 
15,683.23 


0.00 
2,066.77 


0.00 

0.00 


0.00 
2,066.77 






0.00 


158,285.37 


156,218.60 


2,066.77 


0.00 


2,066.77 


Sewer 
Sewer 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
112,000.00 


61,278.00 
111,870.00 


61,105.47 
117,286.32 


172.53 
106,583.68 


0.00 
106,583.68 


172.53 
0.00 


Sewer Subtotal 
Total Public Works 


112,000.00 
/4U,Uo/.4/ 


173,148.00 

c 004 7CA CO 


178,391.79 

C 0C7 4 00 flC 

o,3o/,l2o.yo 


106,756.21 

07>l -7 4 in 


106,583.68 

OCA -tC 

240,854.15 


172.53 

OO CO nc 

33,858.95 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 


Sal-Director 
Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
Mental Health 
Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 

1,517.41 

U.UU 
0.00 


66,342.74 
146,873.11 
10,285.00 
jU,/UU.UU 

0.00 


66,342.74 
146,873.11 
9,575.22 

on cf\n nc 

0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
2,227.19 

n riA 
0.U4 

0.00 


0.00 
0.00 

635.77 

n nn 
0.00 

0.00 


0.00 
0.00 
1,591.42 
0.04 
0.00 






1,517.41 


254,200.85 


253,491.03 


2,227.23 


635.77 


1.591.46 


Sealer/Wts & Meas. 
Sealer/Wts & Meas. 


Salaries 

Sm. Tools & Equip. 


0.00 

0.00 


4,800.00 
100.00 


4,800.00 
0.00 


0.00 
100.00 


0.00 

0.00 


0.00 
100.00 






0.00 


4,900.00 


t t\f\f\ f\f\ 

4,800.00 


100,00 


0.00 


100,00 


Planninn/P,nn*iprv 
Planning/Conserv. 
Planning/Conserv. 
Planning/Consen/. 


^al-Dirprtrir 

Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 

1,348.00 
928.00 


69 679 34 
153,152.00 
15,175.00 
400.00 


69 679 34 
151,976.81 
12,177.47 
338.00 


0.00 
1,175.19 
4,345.53 
990.00 


0.00 
0.00 

1,456.38 
0.00 


0.00 
1,175.19 
2,889.15 
990.00 




2,276.00 


238,406.34 


234,171.62 


6,510.72 


1,456.38 


5,054,34 


BIdg. Inspector 
BIdg. Inspector 
BIdg, Inspector 
BIdg. Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 
Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 

0.00 
1,495.01 
0.00 


62,690.77 
93,611.00 
5,065.00 
800,00 


62,690.77 
91,752.41 
5,553.97 
0.00 


0.00 
1,858.59 
1,006,04 
800.00 


0.00 
0.00 

0.00 

0,00 


0,00 
1,858,59 
1,006,04 
800,00 




1,495.01 


162,166,77 


159,997.15 


3,664,63 


0,00 


3,664 63 


Community Development Subtota 




5,288.42 


659,673.96 


652,459.80 


12,502.58 


2,092.15 


10,410.43 



-31- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



CI IMPTinM/APTI\/ITV 




Unr\r\T rUKVVnKU 


ADDDnODI ATIHM 
MrrKUrKIn 1 lUN 


CYDCMr^iTi lore 
tArtlNUl 1 UKto 


DAt AMPC 


OAKKT rUKWAKU 


OLUbb 






FROM FY 2003 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


TO FISCAL 2005 


FISCAL 2004 


PI iRi ir Ri IN niMfi^- 
















Public Buildings 


Sal-Super. 


U.UU 




95,227.20 


n Art 

0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


r UUIIC DUIIUlllCJo 


odIdilco-VJUlCl 


U.UU 


1 ,3 1 4,0UD.UU 




10, !*♦ 1 .0 1 


1ft 141 "il 
10, In 1 .D 1 


n nn 

U.UU 


Public Buildings 


Expenses-Town BIdg 


12,667,30 


113,450.00 


125,185.64 


931.66 


931.66 


(0.00) 


Public Buildings 


Electric-Town BIdgs. 


0.00 


120,110.00 


106,963.82 


13,146.18 


11,588.00 


1,558.18 


Piihlip RiiilHinnc 


1 Itllitioc-TnvA/n RIHnQ 

LfUIIUCo 1 UWI 1 DIU^O. 


on 


Qfi fiQn nn 

7U,U«7U.UU 


Qfi SQn nn 

%7U,Ot7U.Uv 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


Piihlip RiiilHinnQ 






ifi"? 9nn nn 


171 fi7n Q4 


18 n? 


n nn 

U.UU 


ifi no 
00. u^ 


r UUIIO uUIIUiliyo 


1 rdllllliy Ot UUIIIclcllUc 


n no 

U.UU 


'^ft'^ nn 

OOJ.UU 


U.UU 


ooc nn 
oOD.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


00c nn 
009. UU 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


0.00 


A'jc nAA nn 

475,000.00 


474,262.36 


737.64 


0.00 


737.64 


Public Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


0.00 


7,000.00 


6,610.00 


390.00 


0.00 


390.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


9,708.34 


9,500.00 


13,744.44 


5,463.90 


5,463.90 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


7,463.08 


53,000.00 


60,431.64 


31.44 


0.00 


31.44 






38,347.68 


3,048,568.20 


3,047,650.53 


39,265.35 


36,125.07 


3,140.28 






3fl "^47 68 


-? n48 '568 ?n 


3 047 650 




ofi 1 oc n? 


1 14n OR 


HUMAN SERVICES: 
















Veterans 


Salary 


0.00 


7,631.63 


7,631.63 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Veterans 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,410.00 


2,012.24 


397.76 


0.00 


397.76 


Veterans 


Assistance 


0.00 


15,000.00 


6,013.26 


8,986.74 


0.00 


8,986.74 






U.UU 




1c (:c7 lo 
19, Oj/. \o 


Q 0ft4 tin 


n nn 

U.UU 


Q Ofly! Cn 

y,oo4.3U 


Library 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


66,800.33 


66,800.33 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


479,403.99 


479,403.99 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1 ihrfirv 




n no 


ipT nn 


1?3 3Pfi ?1 


24.79 


n no 

U.UU 


94 7Q 


LlUldiy 


IVt. V .L.U. 


U.UU 


"^1 Q9n nn 
1 ,^^u.uu 


?1 Q9n nn 

i ,^^u.uu 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


Library 


Furnish & Equip. 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 






0.00 


701,475.32 


701,450.53 


24.79 


0.00 


24.79 


r\cLICallUfl 


odiaiy-uircuiui 


n nn 

U.UU 


•^i nofi nn 

yj 1 ,U!7U.UU 


"in 774 Q"; 


191 n*; 

0^ 1 .U9 


n nn 

U.UU 




Recreation 


Salaries-Other 


n nn 

U.UU 


An 701 AR 


An 701 /IR 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


Recreation 


Expenses 


U.UU 


o onn nn 
J,oUU.UU 


z,y4u.4y 


ocn cA 


1>17 7C 


01 1 7C 






0.00 


95,119.46 


94,438.90 


680.56 


147.76 


532.80 


Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 


n nn 
U.UU 


CO 7X7 0*3 
D0,/4/.00 


CO 7^7 00 


U.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


Elderly Services 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


72,674.62 


72,674.62 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


35,677.00 


oc con 4 < 

35,539.11 


4 07 on 

137.89 


n nn 
U.UU 


4 07 on 






0.00 


162,098.95 


161,961.06 


137.89 


0.00 


137.89 


Historical ComrTi. 


Salaries 


U.UU 


00 000 nn 


01 000 CiCi 

^o.^^^.uu 


U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


Historical Comm. 


Expenses 


2,365.70 


A nnn nn 

4,000.00 




l,4Uo.JD 


4 >ino oc 


n nn 
U.UU 


Historical Comm. 


Fumish & Equip. 


3,962.04 


0.00 


2,279.25 


4 coo 7A 

1,682.79 


4 i?on "rn 

1,682.79 


0.00 






6,327.74 


27,222.00 


30,463.60 


3,086.14 


3,086.14 


0.00 


Com on Disabilities 


Salaries 


0.00 


200.00 


0.00 


200.00 


0.00 


200.00 


Com on Disabilities 


Expenses 


n nn 
U.UU 


onn nn 
oUU.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


onn nn 
3UU.UU 


n nn 
U.UU 


onn nn 
JUU.UU 






0.00 


500.00 


0.00 


500.00 


0.00 


500.00 


Human Services Subtotal 




6,327.74 


1.011,457.36 


1,003,971.22 


13,813.88 


3,233.90 


10,579.98 


EDUCATION; 
















School Dept. 


Salaries 


234,296.22 


18,401,610.00 


17,949,118.20 


686,788.02 


470,710.58 


216.077.44 


School Dept. 


Expenses 


178,652.09 


5,352,250.00 


5,746,979.53 


(216,077.44) 


0.00 


(216,077.44) 






412,948.31 


23,753,860.00 


23,696,097.73 


470,710.58 


470,710.58 


(0.00) 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


2,836,458.00 


2,836,458.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


2,836,458.00 


2,836,458.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



-32- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




CARRY FORWARD 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 2003 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


TO FISCAL 2005 


FISCAL 2004 


Education Subtotal 




412,948.31 


26,590,318.00 


26,532,555.73 


470,710.58 


470,710.58 


(0.00) 


DEBT SERVICE: 
















Debt & Interest 


Schools 


0.00 


3,517,275.00 


3,517,275.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Gen, Govemment 


0.00 


1,113,300.00 


1,113,300.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Sewer 


0.00 


212,000.00 


211,999.50 


0.50 


0.00 


0.50 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Auth. Fees & Misc. 


0.00 


118,000.00 


114,932.91 


3,067.09 


0.00 


3,067.09 






0.00 


4,960,575.00 


4,957,507.41 


3,067.59 


0.00 


3,067.59 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 




0.00 


4,960,575.00 


4,957,507.41 


3,067.59 


0.00 


3,067.59 


Insurance & Bonds 




27,734.71 


575,200.00 


587,402.39 


15,532.32 


0.00 


15,532.32 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 




232,996.47 


5,593,276.37 


5,836,733.86 


(10,461.02) 


(10,461.02) 


0.00 


Veterans' Retirement 




0.00 


13,399.00 


13,008.48 


390.52 


0.00 


390.52 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 






"^n Rnn nn 

JU,OUU.UU 


■^n Ann nn 

ou,ouu.uu 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


Medicare Employers' Contr. 




0.00 


333,260.78 


333,260.78 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 




0.00 


53,630.80 


43,572.68 


10,058.12 


10,058.12 


0.00 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 




2,769.88 


2,100.00 


1,216.14 


3,653.74 


25.00 


3,628.74 


Out of State Travel 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Computer Hdwe/Sfhwe Maint. & Expenses 


65,129.88 


94,931.80 


67,230.00 


92,831.68 


92,831.68 


0.00 


Records Storage 




2,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2,000.00 


0.00 


2,000.00 


Annual Audit 




2,100.00 


13,800.00 


15,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Ambulance Billing 




0.00 


30,000.00 


21,760.80 


8,239.20 


0.00 


8,239.20 


Town Report 




0.00 


12,000.00 


9,166.00 


2,834.00 


0.00 


2,834.00 


Professional & Tecfinical Services 




113,575.67 


11,758.25 


61,900.75 


63,433.17 


63,433.17 


0.00 


Reserve Fund 




0.00 


161.995.00 


0.00 


161,995.00 


0.00 


161,995.00 


Unclassified Subtotal 




446,306.61 


6,926,152.00 


7,021,951.88 


350,506.73 


155,886.95 


194,619.78 


Cunrent Year Overlay 




0.00 


750,000.00 


0.00 


750,000.00 


0.00 


750,000.00 


Retirement Contributions 




0.00 


2 033 038 00 


2 033 038 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Offset Items 




U.UU 


4Z,00D.UU 


U.UU 




n nn 

U.UU 




Special Education 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 




0.00 


410,859.00 


410,859.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 




0.00 


5,557.00 


5,557.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 




0.00 


12,440.00 


13,000.00 


(560.00) 


0.00 


(560,00) 


Metro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 




0.00 


5 921 00 


5 921 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Mosquito Control Program 




0.00 


37 879 00 


37 866 00 


13.00 


0.00 


13,00 


M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 




0.00 


1 774 470 00 


1 754 957 44 


19,512.56 


0.00 


19,512,56 


Charter Schools 




n nn 


7 nui nn 

/ ,UOH.UU 


7 Q4n nn 




nn 




School Choice 




0.00 


16,251.00 


13,775.00 


1 A~J/^ Art 

2,476.00 


A AA 

0.00 


2,476,00 


Criminal Justice Training 




n nn 

U.UU 


fi Qnn nn 

0, JwU.UU 


-inn nn 


4 finn no 


0.00 


4 600 00 


Essex County Tech Institure 




0.00 


9,225.00 


9,225.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 




0.00 


5,112,009.00 


4,294,438.44 


817,570.56 


0.00 


817,570.56 


Unclassified 


MemorialA/ets Day 


0.00 


5,000.00 


2,050.17 


2,949.83 


0.00 


2,949.83 


Unclassified 


Lease of Quarters 


0.00 


2,250.00 


2,250.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


Unclassified 


Streets 


0.00 


300.00 


0.00 


300.00 


0.00 


300.00 


Unclassified 


Senior Tax Rebate Prog. 


1,545.00 


10,385.00 


6,530.00 


5,400.00 


5,400.00 


0.00 


Unclassified 


Stonn Water Mgmt Plan 


80,000.00 


0.00 


9,254.41 


70,745.59 


70,745.59 


0,00 


Unclassified 


Site Assessment 


0.00 


25,000.00 


0.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


0,00 


Wan-ant Articles Subtotal 




81,545.00 


42,935.00 


20,084.58 


104,395.42 


101,145.59 


3,249,83 



-33- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END JUNE 30, 2004 



TRANSFER & 



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FROM FY 2003 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


FISCAL 2004 


TO FISCAL 2005 


FISCAL 2004 


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Public Works 


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Public Works 


Brush Chipper 


0.00 


38,600.00 


0.00 


38,600.00 


38,600.00 


0.00 


Public Works 


Vertidraln 


u.uu 


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14 RQQ nn 
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Public Works 


Town SeptaQe Facility 


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Public Works 


Cemetery Expansion 


83,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


83,000.00 


83,000.00 


0.00 


Public Works 


No. Wilmington Parking Are 


32,000.00 


0.00 


30,624.23 


1,375.77 


0.00 


1,375.77 


Public Works 


P & G Rehab Alumni Track 


30,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,000.00 


30,000.00 


0.00 


Public Works 


Skateboard Park 


30,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


30,000.00 


30,000.00 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


Handicapped Van 


0.00 


48,000.00 


48,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


School 


Replace Glass Windows 


7,280.87 


0.00 


548.82 


6,732.05 


6,732.05 


0.00 


School 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


99,000.00 


93,938.25 


5,061.75 


5,061.75 


0.00 


School 


Security System WHS 


50,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


0.00 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 




248,572.87 


468,200.00 


436,762.92 


280,009.95 


272,099.23 


7,910.72 


GRAND TOTAL 




2,329,622.16 


61,976,787.28 


61,027,262.92 


2,516,595.34 


1,362,973.73 


1,153,621.61 



-34- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 



P)C\ /r~Mi tT~o. 

REVENUES: 


Actual Fiscal 
2001 


Actual Fiscal 
2002 


Actual Fiscal 
2003 


Actual Fiscal 
2004 


Water Receivables Rates 

\A/?itpr Rpppi\/aKIPQ ^prv/i^pc 
VVClld rxCud vaUICo OCIVIUCo 

Water Receivables Industrial 

Wfltpr Rpppiuphlp^ Hnnnprtinn^ 

Water Receivables Fire Protection 

Water Receivables Cross Connections 

Water Liens 

Special Assessments 

Property Rentals 

Miscellaneous 

Reimbursements 


2,761,354.25 

24,557.56 
fiO 71R Rf) 
44,819.92 
25,760.00 
120,107.69 
1,189.23 
0.00 
168,180.84 
55,718.61 


2,970,572.68 
9ft 741 S9 

13,976.68 

lie; c-ic on 

44,693.98 
24,714.15 
120,053.07 
1,060.30 
65,119.90 
51,803.81 
12,072.50 


2,746,952.98 

nc ceo cc 

20,662.63 

\JI ,\J\J\J.\J\J 

48,479.63 
26,355.00 
107,167.07 
656.47 
101,671.60 
33,742.10 
5,500.00 


3,176,866.29 

1ft 1ft9 7Q 

10,973.64 
-50 99R 5fi 

44,378.57 
29,597.13 
202,350.79 
623.85 
111,214.12 
350,999.27 
6,644.94 


Total Revenue 


3,286,633.75 


3,448,425.44 


3,153,846.68 


3,982,059.95 


Operating Costs 


2,200,029.73 


2,694,514.68 


3,464,624.58 


3,851,233.30 


Total Operating Costs 


2,200,029,73 


2,694,514.68 


3,464,624.58 


3,851,233,30 


Excess Revenues over Operating Costs 


1,086,604.02 


753,910.76 


(310,777.90) 


130,826.65 


Transfer to General Fund for Debt Service, 
Employees Benefits and Allocated Charges 


480,297.00 


338,003.00 


373,599.00 


470,523,00 


Excess of Expenditures and 
Transfers over Revenues 


606,307.02 


415,907.76 


(684,376.90) 


(339,696.35) 


Total Fund Balance - Beginning 


2,071,442.58 


2,677,749.60 


3,093,657.36 


2,409,280,46 


Total Fund Balance - Ending 


2,677,749.60 


3,093,657.36 


2,409,280.46 


2,069,584.11 



-35- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2004 

Total 





Main Street 


Middle School 


Public Safety 


High School 


(Memorandum 




Sewer 


Project 


Building 


Renovation 


Only) 


Town Meeting Dates 


4/22/89 


4/26/97 


4/26/97 


4/21/01 




Initial Project Authorization 


747,000 


25,600,000 


8,000,000 


975,000 


35,402,000 


REVENUES: 












Intergovernmental 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


EXPENDITURES: 












Capital Outlay 












Total Expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


31,266.40 


6,820.50 


38,086,90 


Excess of revenues over/under 












expenditures 


0.00 


0.00 


(31,266.40) 


(6,820.50) 


(38,086.90) 


Other Financial Sources(uses): 












Retirement of Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Proceeds of General 












Obligation Bonds & Notes 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Operating Transfers 


0.00 


0.00 


14,000.00 


0.00 


14,000.00 


Other Financial Sources/Uses 


0.00 


0.00 


14,000.00 


0.00 


14,000.00 


Excess of revenues 












and other sources over 












(under) expenditures and 












other uses 


0.00 


0.00 


(17,266.40) 


(6,820.50) 


(24,086.90) 


FUND BALANCE JULY 1,2003 


56,000.60 


121,812.80 


20,882.32 


38,880.16 


237,575.88 


FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 2004 


56,000.60 


121,812.80 


3,615.92 


32,059.66 


213,488.98 



-36- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2004 











ORIGINAL 


PRINCIPAL 






PRINCIPAL 




YEAR 


YEAR 




PRINCIPAL 


OUTSTANDING 


BOND 


PRINCIPAL 


OUTSTANDING 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


AMOUNT 


JUNE 30, 2003 


ADDITIONS 


RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30, 2004 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Comprehensive Middle School 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


24,300,000 


19.444,000 





2,427,500 


17,016,500 


High School Renovation 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


975,000 


780,000 





97,500 


682,500 


Public Safety Building 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


5,986,000 


4,786,000 





600,000 


4,186,000 


Public Safety Building 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


2,000,000 


1,600,000 





200,000 


1,400,000 


Main Street Sewer Project 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


985,000 


785,000 





100,000 


685,000 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 








34,246,000 


27,395,000 





3,425,000 


23,970,000 



-37- 



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-38- 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



ire 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the 
operations, activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department 
for the year 2004. It is also with deep regret the department saw the passing 
of retired Fire Lieutenant Joseph C. Lundergan and Fire Fighter Keith Marshall 
this past year. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five lieutenants, 
thirty fire fighters, one full-time clerk, and one part-time clerk. The 
following roster is provided: 

Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 



Lieutenants 



John Brown, Jr. 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Christopher J. Nee 



Edmund J. Corcoran, III 
Joseph T. McMahon 



Clerks 

Linda K. DeMole 
Isabel E. Raschella - Part-Time 



Brian D. Anderson 
George A. Anderson, 
George A. Anderson, 
Thomas C. Casella 
Thomas W. Ceres 
David J. Currier 
Walter R. Daley 
Gary J. Donovan 
George J. Driscoll 
David R. Feyler 



Fire Fighters 

Linda S. Giles 
Jr. Kenneth P. Gray 
III Eric M. Gronemeyer 
William J. Herrick, 
Richard J. Hughes 
Andrew W. Leverone 
Richard T. McClellan 
John F. McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 



Christopher G. Pozzi 
Eric S . Robbins 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Jr. Frederick J. Ryan 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



The combined civilian dispatch center has been operational since we moved 
into the Public Safety Building three years ago. The unit is under the 
direct and joint control of both the Fire and Police Departments and is 
staffed by the following personnel: 

Dispatcher Supervisor 

April E. Kingston 



Dispatchers 



Nancy E. Beals 
Marc D. DiLeo 
Cheryl A. Doyle 
Marc A. Fluet 
Jamie A. Gustafson 
Thomas J. Seeley, Jr. 



Darryl N. Sencabaugh 
Kyle L. Sencabaugh 
Christopher H. Sullivan 
Michael A. Sweet 
Christopher S. Zollner 



Michael J. Enos 



Part-Time 



Robert J. LaVita 



-39- 



The Central Dispatch Department funds twelve full-time dispatchers as well as 
an on-call roster of part-time dispatchers. This concept continues to allow 
for much more efficient use of fire fighters in service to the community. 

Lieutenant Joseph McMahon continues to provide in-service training to 
dispatchers as needed through a series of classes that cover the policies and 
standard operating guidelines of the Fire Department. Deputy Chief Edward 
Bradbury continues to oversee the fire side of dispatch and works closely 
with Supervisor April Kingston and the dispatchers to insure a smooth 
operation . 

Central Dispatch also continues to work with Deputy Chief Edward Bradbury to 
upgrade the already state-of-the-art equipment (i.e. radios, computers, fire 
alarm systems) to match the needs of our town. The emergency monitoring 
capability of dispatch continues to grow and improve. 

The department responded to a total of 2,444 calls during 2004. 



Residential Buildings 


14 


False Alarms 


294 


Residential (Other) 


1 


Ambulance/Rescues /Water 


1, 541 


Commercial Structures 


2 


Service Calls 


287 


Commercial (Other) 


3 


Carbon Monoxide Detectors 


18 






Haz Mat 


3 


Chimney, Fireplaces & 








Woodburning Stoves 


3 


Out of Town Assistance 


167 


Vehicles 


35 


Haz Mat 


1 


Brush, Grass or Rubbish 


73 


Fire 


21 


Dumpsters 


3 


Ambulance/Rescue 


145 


Estimated value of property 


endangered was $2,178,500. Estimated property 1( 


$71, 100 . 








The following is a list of 


permits issued 






Black Powder 


2 


Propane 


70 


Blasting 


13 


Report 


24 


Class C Explosive 


1 


Smoke Detector 


258 


Fire Alarm 


61 


Tank 


105 


Flammable Liquid 


11 


Miscellaneous 


22 


Oil Burner 


136 


Sprinkler 


52 


Subpoena 


1 


Truck 


21 


Welding 


7 


Gas Stations 


3 






TOTAL 


759 



As required by law, the Fire Prevention Bureau under the direction of 
Lieutenant Daniel Hurley inspected all schools, public buildings, nursing homes 
and flammable storage facilities. Other inspections listed below: 



New Residential Plans Review 152 

New Residential Fire Inspections 49 

New Industrial Plans Review 30 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 75 

Underground Tank Removals 12 

Underground Tank Installations 5 

Oil Burner 46 

Propane 75 



Shift personnel inspected 285 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 148, Section 26F. This 
year we began an in-service fire inspection program of commercial properties. 
Two hundred fifteen inspections were conducted by on-duty shift personnel to 
identify and correct hazards while familiarizing themselves with the 



-40- 



properties. The program is supervised by Lieutenants McMahon, Brown, Nee and 
Corcoran and overseen by Fire Prevention Lt . Hurley. 

Classrooms at all of the public schools K-5 have received instruction on fire 
safety by Lieutenant Daniel Hurley. The Safe Grant which funded an expanded 
fire safety education program in past years has been discontinued pending 
approval of future legislation. Seniors at the Senior Center also received 
instruction on Fire Safety. Lt . Hurley also began a program of joining 
inspections with mutual aid fire departments in shared response districts. 

In August the Democratic National Convention came 
to Boston. The anticipated impact on the region 
required the largest scale regional emergency 
planning effort in history. The command center for 
this effort was located in Wilmington as town 
officials took a lead role in developing an 
emergency contingency plan. Over twenty 
communities and agencies interacted at the command 
center channeling emergency communications 
throughout the Metropolitan area northwest of 
Boston. Wilmington received an award from NEMLEC 
acknowledging this effort. 

Also in August I attended the International 
Association of Fire Chiefs Association Convention 
with 75 other chiefs from Massachusetts to 
support the installation of Chief Bob DiPoli of Needham as President of the 
lAFC. 

The municipal fire alarm division personnel are Lieutenant Edmund Corcoran 
and Fire Fighter David Feyler. Their mission is to maintain and expand the 
Municipal Fire Alarm System/Keltron digital communicator to provide 
protection to any new or existing facility. 

Two hundred and twenty- five master boxes, sixteen street boxes, and 
approximately twenty-five miles of wire currently make up the six circuits. 
All circuits and boxes are in good working order and all repairs due to storm 
damage or accidents have been corrected. 

New fire alarm boxes added to the system are as follows: 




Woburn Police Chief Phil Mahoney 
presents award to Chief Stewart 



1228 Car Mart Subaru, 275 Main Street 

3118 Commercial Realty Trust, 474 Main Street 

3234 Lucci's Realty Trust, 230 Lowell Street 

6233 Charles River Labs, 251 Ballardvale Street 

Master boxes replaced or moved due to remodeling 

3318 Wilmington Millwork Division, 23 Industrial Way 

6352 Howland Development, 250 Ballardvale Street 



New Keltron Accounts 

Cumberland Farms/Gulf, 205 Main Street 

Wilmington Citgo/Firestone, 490 Main Street 

All Star Wireless/Subway, 285 Main Street 

DiCenso Properties, 65 Industrial Way 

Vestcom, 5 Cornell Place 

PGA Realty Trust, 226 Andover Street 

Office Paper Recovery Systems, 235 Andover Street 

Howland Development, 250 Ballardvale Street 

P.J. Dionne Company, 6 Jonspin Road 

Lucci Realty Trust, 230 Lowell Street 

Jiffy Lube, 520 Main Street 



-41- 



Lowell Street and Woburn to Lowell Street and West Street 2,500 feet of "C" 
wire was installed to replace the old single strand; circuits. 
Lowell Street and Woburn Street to Industrial Way at #21 a multipair wire was 
installed to replace the old single strand. The multipair has the capacity for 
one radio circuit. 5,700 feet of 3 pair wire. 

Lowell Street and Main Street to the Woburn town line with Woburn was replaced 
and paid for by Raytheon to make space on the utility poles for a private fiber 
optics line. 5,500 feet "C" wire. 

The Keltron Alarm Central Station service has 36 accounts that receive fire 
alarms in addition to the master boxes. I would like to commend these 
individuals for taking the initiative to learn a completely new system and 
implement it as they have. 

In December the department began closing out the performance period of the Fire 
Fighter Safety and Health Grant from FEMA in the amount of $87,685. This grant 
provided for baseline medical evaluations for any member of the department 
wishing to receive one. The grant also provided training for all members in 
areas to create healthier lifestyles. New strength training and cardio 
equipment was installed in the Public Safety Building. Boston Bruins Strength 
and Conditioning Coach John Whitesides conducted training to utilize the 
equipment and develop individual programs . Fire Fighter Charles Taylor and 
Part-time Clerk Isabel Raschella were instrumental in developing this fire 
fighter wellness program. Fire Fighter Taylor continues to work toward 
certfication as a personal fitness trainer to help fire fighters stay in shape. 

Departmental goals 
continue to be realized at 
a steady pace. It 
continues to be my hope to 
offer fire based Advanced 
Life Support to the 
community as a cost 
effective service upgrade 
and mechanism to increase 
needed staffing. As 
outlined in my capital 
improvement five year 
projection, the time is 
now to begin this final 
piece of bringing the 
Wilmington Fire Department 
to the level deserved by 
the community. 




Future fire fighter admires Wilmington's Squad One. 



I am optimistic that major projects slated for the near future will be the 
catalyst to help us achieve the goal of a sub-station as stated by former Fire 
Chief Arthur J. Boudreau in the annual report of 1956. A shopping mall and 
hotels along Route 93 and the associated expansion of industry in the 
Ballardvale Street area will require the fire protection that has been needed 
for so long in North Wilmington. 

I wish to extend my sincere appreciation to Deputy Fire Chief Edward Bradbury, 
Clerk Linda DeMole, Lieutenant Daniel M. Hurley, Part-time Clerk Isabel 
Rashcella and Fire Fighter Charles Taylor. A special appreciation to Fire 
Fighter Thomas Ceres for overseeing the computer program for the department and 
all of the members of the Fire, Police and Dispatch Departments for your 
efforts . 

As always, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant 
Town Manager, Department Heads, the Board of Selectmen and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. 

-42- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the by-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year 2004. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 2004 and, for the most 
part, the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police 
Department. During 2004, the total number of complaints and incidents 
reported to the Police Department increased by 3,021 from 23,479 incidents in 
2003 to 26,500 in 2004. Cruisers were dispatched to 19,484 calls for service 
in 2004. This reflects an increase of 3,192 over the 2003 figures. 

Several of the more serious crime categories saw an increase during 2004. 
Larcenies increased significantly from 219 in 2003 to 345 in 2004. The 
number of armed robberies increased from 2 in 2003 to 7 in 2004. Reported 
rapes also increased from 3 in 2003 to 7 in 2004. Other sex related problems 
also increased from 8 in 2003 to 10 in 2004. Assault, both simple and 
aggravated, shows an increase from 20 in 2003 to 41 in 2004. Drug offenses 
increased in 2004 with 68 instances, an increase of 20 over 2003. Motor 
vehicle theft also increased to 28 in 2004 over 16 in 2003. 

The brighter side of these statistics is that domestic problems have free 
fallen to a low of 184 for 2004. This is a decrease of 304 from 2003. The 
department reports that this figure of 184 is lower than the 209 reported in 
2000. This is attributed to an ongoing education process in the news media 
as well as knowledge dispensed on the reporting process locally.. 

Motor Vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be a serious 
community problem. During 2004 motor vehicle accidents increased to 732 over 
the 616 reported in 2003. This is an area that, although increasing, has 
fallen below figures experienced in the year 2000 when 832 accidents were 
reported. The enforcement effort is evident by the number of citations 
issued by the department for 2004. This figure is 8,003 up from the figure 
of 4,298 issued in 2003. A significant increase in citations issued still 
did not decrease the number of accidents within the community. The town has 
implemented speed signs in various parts of the community that digitally 
record your speed and also reflect the correct speed for the zone they are 
in. This is an ongoing struggle that is usually successful when an effort is 
forthcoming from the entire community. 

The following are totals for some of the major areas of concern; speeding 
violations, 4,205; operators' license violations, 374; unregistered and 
uninsured, 290; and miscellaneous violations totaling 2,035. Arrests for 
operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol decreased from 116 
in 2003 to 72 in 2004. This is a direct effort of the enforcement conducted 
by the department with these type drivers in mind. 

Arrests for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 2004 totaled 405, 
a decrease from 433 in 2003. The Police Department continues to place a high 
priority on alcohol and drug related offenses. Arrests for liquor law 
violations increased slightly from 15 in 2003 to 17 in 2004. This is down 
from the 52 arrests in 2000. An ongoing effort to address this issue is 
showing the effects of this initiative. 

In addition to the above statistics, the department has increased their 
bicycle patrols throughout the year except for severe weather conditions 
during the winter months. Look for this to continue as well as visibility 
enhanced by all uniformed officers conducting traffic enforcement in selected 



-43- 



areas. The Community Policing trailer has again been deployed at the Fourth 
of July activities as well as DeMoulas Plaza during the Christmas holidays. 
Officers are available with brochures on bicycle safety helmets, child safety 
restraints and other areas of interest. 

During 2004, officers have conducted several Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) 
programs for women in our department training facility. The Elderly Services 
Unit continued with efforts for the town seniors. Working hand and hand with 
Elderly Services Director Terri Marciello, a number of seniors enjoyed trips 
to the North Shore Music Theatre during the year as well as luncheons. We 
will continue our efforts to keep seniors apprised of potential fraud 
initiatives when available. 

The safety officer conducted several programs during the year that targeted 
school bus safety, winter safety, bicycle safety and the Officer Phil Program 
that teaches young people to beware of strangers . The DARE program concludes 
its 18'^*' year in 2004. From its humble beginnings as a pilot program at the 
Woburn Street School in 1987, it quickly spread to all elementary schools in 
1988 and has continued to this day. The key message during DARE classes is 
how to resist the temptations to engage in drug, alcohol and tobacco usage. 
Our two School Resource Officers, located in the High School and the Middle 
School have completed their third year under a grant program. The 
department's child safety seat program has been extremely successful as our 
four officer technicians installed 596 safety seats for grateful parents. 
Officers were able to donate seats to replace defective or unsafe seats for 
deserving parents through grant funds. 

The department has increased its effort to provide training for Wilmington 
officers as well as surrounding communities. Our new training facility is 
attractive and has been requested for use by the Massachusetts Police 
Institute on many occasions during 2004. Our department benefits from these 
programs as we are entitled to seats in these valuable training classes 
without cost. 

We are entering 2005 and I would like to introduce you to two new officers. 
Officer Christopher Ahern and Officer John Delorey. Officer Ahern began 
regular duties in July 2004 and Officer Delorey completes his Police Academy 
training December 7, 2004. He will then assume a regular patrol position. 
We have also begun to utilize a Field Training Officer (FTO) to its fullest 
extent. Officer Paul Chalifour will work with and train new officers over 
an extended period of time. This has long been a need that is presently able 
to be addressed due to the number of officers available. 

We will also be introducing the community to the new K-9 Patrol and its 
handler. Officer Eric Palmer. K-9 Kimo recently completed training at the 
Boston Police Academy in December 2004. Kimo and Officer Palmer will be 
visible throughout the community. This provides another tool for the 
community and the Police Department to resolve certain issues such as missing 
children, elderly residents who wander off, searching for suspects and 
recovering stolen property, as well as alerting police to illegal substances. 
Officer Palmer and Kimo will also be available for demonstrations for school 
groups as well as civic organizations in the community. This particular 
program did not cost the town any dollars as a very generous donation was 
received from a business in town. 

In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all boards and committees and all department heads and employees 
for their support and cooperation during the past year. This is my only 
annual report to the residents of Wilmington after serving as your Chief for 
the past 18 months. I have attempted to provide the best for the community 
and the Police Department during my tenure. Many changes have taken place in 



-44- 



the community during my career of 32 years. The town has grown in population 
and its commercial base has expanded greatly. Increasing demands for service 
are reflected in the statistical information provided in this report. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts, none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. I am proud to have had the 
opportunity to lead such a professional group of men and women. 

The following is a Departmental Roster of Personnel: 

Chief of Police, Robert H. Spencer, Jr. 
Deputy Chief, Michael R. Begonis 
Lt . Robert V. Richter, Operations Lt . J. Christopher Neville, Det. /Admin. 



Sergeants 

David L. Axelrod 
David J. Bradbury 
Joseph A. Desmond 
Charles R. Fiore 
David M. McCue, Jr. 
Scott A. Sencabaugh 

Detectives and Specialists 

Court/Inspector, James R. White 
DARE, Julie M. Brisbois 
Grants, Brian T. Pupa 
Inspector, Thomas A. Miller 
Inspector, David A. Sugrue 
Inspector, Patrick B. Nally 
Inspector, Brian J. Stickney 
Juvenile/Sex, Patrick J. King 
Narcotics, John M. Bossi 
Safety Officer, Brian M. Moon 
School Resource, Chester A. Bruce, 
School Resource, Anthony Fiore 



III 



Uniform Patrol Officers 
Christopher J. Ahern 
Ronald J. Alpers, Jr. 
Daniel C. Cadigan 
Paul R. Chalifour 
John W. Delorey 
Christopher J. Dindo 
Richard A. DiPerri, Jr. 
Brian J. Gillis 
Francis D. Hancock 
Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 
Brian T. Hermann 
Paul W. Jepson 
Paul A. Krzeminski 
Steven R. LaRivee 
Shawn W . Lee 
Louis Martignetti 
Stephen F. Mauriello 
Thomas A. McConologue 
Daniel E. Murray 
Eric T. Palmer 
Jon C. Shepard 
Matthew D. Stavro 
John F. Tully 
Michael W. Wandell 



Clerical Staff 



Patricia Gustafson and Julie Clark 




Chief Robert Spencer, 
Officer Eric Palmer, 
Town Manager Michael 
Caira and Chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen 
Michael McCoy 
welcome the Police 
Department's newest 
recruit, Kimo. 



-45- 




tmmmmmm > 
tmmmm.m<^ 



■46- 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics, Year 2004 



Protective Custody 
Ages : 

11/12 

13/14 1 

15 1 

16 1 

17 7 
Total Under 18 10 

18 14 

19 10 

20 13 

21 10 

22 7 

23 6 

24 6 
25/29 16 
30/34 18 
35/39 16 
40/44 15 
45/49 17 
50/54 6 
55/59 5 

60 and over 1 

TOTAL 160 

TOTAL PROTECTIVE 17 
CUSTODY 

LARCENIES 

Pocket Picking 

Purse Snatching 3 

Shoplifting 16 

From Motor Vehicle 91 

M/V Parts & Accessories 10 

Bikes 6 

From Buildings 57 

From Coin Machines 1 

Other 150 

TOTAL LARCENIES 334 

FRAUDS 109 

MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN 

Autos 16 

Trucks & Buses 2 

Other Vehicles 8 

TOTAL M/V THEFT 26 

RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered Wilmington 7 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered out of Town 13 

Stolen Out of Town and 

Recovered Wilmington 8 



CITATIONS ISSUED 

Warnings 

Complaints 

Non-Criminal 

Arrests 

TOTAL CITATIONS 

CRIMES REPORTED 
Threats- Arson & Bomb 
Assault & Battery: 

Firearm 

Knife 

Other Weapon 
Aggravated-hand- foot 
Simple Assault 
TOTAL ASSAULTS 

BREAKING & ENTERING 

Residential 

Non Residential 

Attempted 

TOTAL B&Es 

ROBBERY 
Firearm 
Other Weapon 
Strong Arm 

TOTAL ROBBERIES 

INCIDENTS REPORTED 

Alarms responded to 

Disturbances 

Domestic Problems 

Assist other Agencies 

Fires responded to 

Juvenile Complaints 

Missing Persons 

Missing Persons/still missing 

Prowlers Reported 

Miscellaneous Complaints 

M/V Accidents 

Cruisers Dispatched 

Suicides & Attempts 

Sudden Deaths 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS 
Restraining Orders Served 
Parking Tickets Issued 
Firearms I.D. Issued 
License To Carry Issued 
Dealer Permits Issued 
Reports to Insurance 

Companies & Attorneys 
Animal Complaints 
Child Safety Seats 



3, 563 
263 

1, 992 
188 

6,006 



56 

1 
1 
4 

4 
34 
100 



27 
29 
14 
70 



1, 562 
415 
184 
464 
218 
82 
58 
4 
24 

22 , 389 
768 

21, 463 
12 
10 



195 
33 
361 




385 
844 
596 



-47- 



Animal Cootrol 



Dogs Licensed 1,402 

Complaints 967 

Trips 961 

Trip Hours 965.5 

Animals Picked Up 34 

Animals Returned to Owner 18 

Animals Adopted 14 

Animals Picked Up Deceased 45* 

Animals Quarantined 5 

Animals Euthanized 2 

Total Days for Dog in Kennel 135 

Barn Inspections 30 

Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 193 

Total Working Hours 1,862.5 



♦Represents mostly wildlife 




Doe and Fawn on Powderhouse Circle in Febmary. 



-48- 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all 
town and school buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are 
properly cleaned and maintained for town employees, school children and 
personnel and the general public. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
2004 : 

Routine maintenance was performed in all school and municipal buildings. 

A fresh coat of paint was applied to twelve classrooms and gym at the North 
Intermediate School . 

A fresh coat of paint was applied to the July 4"^*^ Building. 
Voting areas were set up for elections. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for musical 
concerts and plays. 

All schools were cleaned over the summer and ready for a clean, fresh start 
to the school year. 

New carpet tiles were installed at the Wilmington Memorial Library. 



New air conditioners were 
installed at the Wilmington 
Memorial Library. 

A new 4,100 square foot section 
of roof was installed over 
kitchen and office areas at the 
Woburn Street School . 

A new 19,320 square foot area of 
roof was installed at the Town 
Hall. 

A fresh coat of paint was 
applied to the exterior of the 
Wilmington Memorial Library. 

New overhang was installed at 

the front entrance of the High School . 

New section of roof was replaced at the Roman House 

New front steps were installed at the Roman House. 





Air conditioning units installed 
at Wilmington Memorial Library. 



Improvements were made to the computer labs at the Woburn Street School and 
Shawsheen School . 

Removed old rugs and asbestos floor tile and replaced with new vinyl tile in 
two classrooms at the High School . 

New exit and emergency lighting was installed at the West Intermediate School 
and Town Hall . 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
town departments, school administration and especially all the employees of 
the Public Buildings Department for their continued help, support and 
cooperation making 2004 a productive year. 



-49- 



I 



Contractors install 19,320 square feet of roof at 
Town Hall 





The year 2004 was a quiet year for the Permanent Building Committee. All 
projects are now complete. We hope the construction of a new library is 
funded in the up coming year so the town can continue the progress for 
generations to come. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager, town departments, school administration and especially the people of 
Wilmington in their support and cooperation for future projects. 



-50- 



Department of Public Works 



In accordance with the by-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. 
Onusseit, hereby respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of 
the Wilmington Department of Public Works for the year 2004. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, 
Cemetery, Parks and Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. 

Major Public Works Projects : 

North Wilmington Improvement Project - A combination of $250,000 in town 
funds and Chapter 90 funds were used for the construction of the North 
Wilmington Improvement Project. The project, which began last year, included 
drainage improvements, new granite curbing, new cement concrete sidewalks, 
new wood guard rails and roadway cold planning and resurfacing on Middlesex 
Avenue (Route 62) in North Wilmington. In addition, the town parking lot in 
North Wilmington was improved with drainage, lighting, paving and 
landscaping. The work was essentially completed in the fall of 2004, with 
some final items such as landscaping and enhanced visibility crosswalks to be 
installed in the spring of 2005. 

High School Track Reconstruction Project - In the summer the town 
reconstructed the high school track with the use of $130,000 in town funds. 
The project consisted of pulverizing the old track, installing a new drainage 
system, laser grading the track's base, placing two new bituminous concrete 
courses and finishing the track with a new rubberized track surface. In 
addition, new facilities were constructed for track and field events. 

Wilmington Skate Park Project - 
With the use of donations of 
$50,000 from Milton Heffron and 
over $50,000 from the Justin 
O'Neil Fund, the town constructed 
a new skate park at the Shawsheen 
School grounds . The total cost of 
the project was over $160,000, 
with over $60,000 being provided 
by town funds . 

Wohurn Street Sidewalk Project - 
Construction on the third phase of 
the Woburn Street Sidewalk Project 
(West Street to Concord Street) 
began in September. Approximately 
2,800 linear feet of the proposed 
Employees prepare for the installation sidewalk area was excavated, 
of new skate park. graded with a gravel base and 

paved with binder course prior to 
winter shutdown. In addition, retaining structures were installed and a 
drainage system was constructed adjacent to sections of the sidewalk. The 
project will commence in the spring of 2005 and, when complete, will provide 
1.6 miles of new sidewalk from Wildwood Street to the Woburn Street School. 

Church Street Roadway Reconstruction Project - With the use of $380,000 of 
Chapter 90 Highway funds the town began the reconstruction of Church Street 
(Route 62) from Main Street to Middlesex Avenue. This project will include 
the upgrading of the roadway's drainage system, the installation of granite 
curbing, the rebuilding of sidewalks (cement concrete) adjacent to the Town 
Common, the cold planning and bituminous concrete resurfacing of the roadway. 




-51- 



and the installation of new high-visibility crosswalks and signage to improve 
pedestrian safety. The work that was completed in 2004 included the 
construction of approximately 2,400 linear feet of cement concrete sidewalks, 
and the installation of approximately 6,600 linear feet of granite curbing. 
The remaining work on the project is scheduled to be completed in 2005. 

Glen Road/Middlesex Avenue Intersection Improvement Project - In 2004, the 
town hired the engineering firm, Green International Affiliates, to prepare 
preliminary and final design plans for the reconstruction and improvement of 
the intersection of Glen Road and Middlesex Avenue (Route 62). The project 
design may include: pavement rehabilitation; sidewalk construction; 
pedestrian safety features; intersection improvements; traffic calming 
features; minor drainage modifications; and the installation of new traffic 
signals. The objective of this project is to improve the intersection 
without creating major impacts to abutting properties. Accordingly, it is 
not anticipated that major roadway widening or land acquisition will be 
undertaken. The design of the project is scheduled to be complete in 2005. 
It is anticipated that state and/or federal funds will be sought for the 
estimated $400,000 construction cost. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 

All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as 
sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the roadsides, picking up trash 
along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Guardrails : Approximately 560 linear feet of wood guardrails were installed 
along Church Street, at Rotary Park and at the North Wilmington parking lot. 

Curbing : Approximately 1,320 linear feet of damaged bituminous concrete 
curbing was replaced at various locations. 

Roadway Projects: 

The following roadway projects were undertaken by the Department of Public 
Works in 2004: 

Bituminous Concrete Resurfacing with Pavement Cold Planning : Chapter 90 
funds from the Massachusetts Highway Department were used on the following 
roadway project: 

Middlesex Avenue (Route 62) - High Street to railroad tracks 

Mic resurfacing: Chapter 90 funds were used for microsurf acing (with 
cracksealing) the following roadway: 

Woburn Street/Andover Street - Salem 
Street to Route 125 

Snow & Ice Removal : The Highway Division 
recorded 56 inches of snow for the winter 
of 2003 - 2004. The average annual 
snowfall for Wilmington is approximately 
54 inches. The storm of December 5-6, 
2003, from which the town received over 24 
inches of snow, was declared a federal 
disaster by FEMA. As a result the town 
applied for, and in March 2004 received, 
$111,163.17 in federal relief funds. 

Sidewalk plow during snow and ice 
remo val opera ti ons 

-52- 

3 




Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried 
out all regular maintenance 
work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying, tree 
removal and tree planting. 
We removed roadside trees 
that were dead or 
interfered with public 
safety at numerous 
locations . 

The Town Common was 
illuminated again this year 
with Christmas lights 
installed by the Tree 
Division . 



Dutch Elm Disease : The 
Tree Division removed 2 5 
diseased Dutch Elm trees. 

Mosquito Control : The town contracts its mosquito control out to the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project (CMMCP) . The CMMCP practices 
Integrated Mosquito Management (IMM) , blending state-of-the-art methods and 
techniques with expertise, experience and scientific research to provide 
member communities with modern, environmentally sound, cost effective 
mosquito control. As part of the effort to reduce the need for pesticides, 
they continue to expand their water management program. By cleaning clogged 
and overgrown waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are 
restored and water quality is improved. 




Employees of the DPW Tree Division affix Christmas lights at the Town 
Common. 



BTI mosquito larvicide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are 
found. They routinely check known breeding sites, but also encourage the 
public to notify them of any areas they suspect could breed mosquitoes. 
Field crews will investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 

The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or 
larviciding but it is recognized that there are times when adult mosquito 
spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases residential and 
recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted 
sprayers . 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations 
for monuments, etc. 



Burials 



Receipts 



Died in Wilmington 
Died Elsewhere 
Non- Re si dents 
Cremations 
Infants 



36 
57 
63 
26 

1 

183 



Interments 

Foundations 

Deeds 



65, 625 . 00 
2 , 937 . 00 
33 . 00 



$ 68, 595 . 00 



-53- 



Reserve 



Trust Fund 



Sale of Lots 
Refund Reserve 
TOTAL 



$24 , 265 . 00 
2 , 360 ■ 00 
$21, 905 . 00 



Perpetual Care 
Refund Trust 
TOTAL 



$25, 027 . 00 
2, 300 ■ 00 
$22 , 727 . 00 



GRAND TOTAL: 



$ 113,227.00 



Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, aerating playing fields, marking ball fields for 
baseball, softball, football, field hockey and soccer. All fields and parks 
were fertilized and brush was cleared from the air vents at all the town's 
schools . 

Athletic Field Projects : All fields were aerated and fertilized during the 
year. Alumni Field at the high school was top dressed and reseeded in 
preparation for the start of the fall season. The Dick Scanlon Baseball 
Field had the infield grass cut back at the base paths and the base paths 
were raised and improved with new clay. 



New playground at the North Intermediate School funded by the generosity ot tlie 
Wilmington Sons of Italy. 

Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions 
with engineering- related projects. This included the review of subdivision 
plans, site plans and special permits for the Planning Board, Notice of 
Intent plan filings for the Conservation Commission and various Board of 
Appeals cases. The Division also established surety estimates for 
subdivision projects and performed construction inspections of subdivision 
roadways. In addition, surveying services and construction inspections were 
provided for various projects of the Department of Public Works. 




Playground 
Proj ects : Using 
a gift of $35 , 000 
from the Sons of 
Italy, a new 
playground was 
constructed at 
the North 
Intermediate 
School . The 
playground meets 
all the new 
safety and 
handicapped 
accessibility 
requirements and 
has been designed 
so that additions 
can be installed 
as needed . 



-54- 



Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 



The Department of Public Works is responsible for the town's various refuse 
disposal and recycling programs. These programs include household rubbish 
and recycling; appliance, television and computer monitor recycling; yard 
waste recycling; waste oil collection; and household hazardous waste 
collection. If homeowners have any questions or complaints, please call the 
above number . 



The yard waste recycling program continued with the recycling of leaves, 
grass clippings, brush and Christmas trees. In January, 3,774 Christmas 
trees were collected at curbside by the Department of Public Works. 

In 2004 the town collected the following amounts of trash and recyclable 
material : 



Trash Collected at Curbside 10,914 Tons 

Recyclables Collected at Curbside 1,408 Tons 

White Goods Collected at Curbside 234 Tons 

Yard waste Collected at Curbside 513 Tons 

Yard waste Delivered to Recycling Center 2,509 Tons 

Cathode Ray Tubes (TV's, Monitors) Recycled 54 Tons 




^'■'~SM Wilmington 
^ Recycles. 



Water & Sewer Department (978-658-4711] 



Water: 



The water meter replacement program has been completed. New remote read 
water meters are in place on all water services. These meters combined with 
a new meter accounting software, enable the town to obtain readings and 
efficiently process bills without inconveniencing home and business owners. 
Billing accuracy should be very reliable which will assist in eliminating 
errors that can be difficult to correct. 



A total of 1,000 feet of water mains were installed using the town's 
workforce. Old cast iron or galvanized water mains, which were undersized, 
are now replaced with 8-inch diameter cement lined ductile iron. This 
improvement will provide an increased water supply to the homes, better water 
quality and provide fire protection to these neighborhoods. 



-55- 



During the month of May, the water main flushing and valve exercising program 
was performed. The department performs the flushing of mains to remove 
sediments and tuberculation that has accumulated in the pipes. Almost 6.5 
million gallons of water is used to accomplish this task but it is necessary 
in order to produce the delivery of good water quality to your home or 
business. At this time, all fire hydrants are inspected and repairs are made 
to any that are not in good working condition. 

The department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
town. In addition, the department removes snow and ice around the fire 
hydrants and assists the highway department with roadway snow and ice 
removal . 



Pumping Statistics: 



Maximum Gallons Per Day 
Maximum Gallons Per Week 
Maximum Gallons Per Month 
Average Gallons Per Day 
Average Gallons Per Month 
Total Gallons Purchased 
Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 
Total Gallons Produced 
Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 



2 , 746, 400 
18, 089, 900 
75, 814, 800 
2, 184, 641 
66, 658, 731 
9, 734 , 526 
799, 904 , 766 
809, 639, 292 
828, 349, 055 



Precipitation Statistics: 

Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 43.38 
Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 56.00 

Consumption Statistics: 



Municipal Use (Gallons) 20,405,590 

Percentage of Total Pumped 2.5% 

Residential Use (Gallons) 413,857,360 

Percentage of Total Pumped 51.1% 

Commercial Use (Gallons) 51,105,896 

Percentage of Total Pumped 6.3% 

Industrial Use (Gallons) 281,098,063 

Percentage of Total Pumped 34.7% 

Annual Water Main Flushing (Gallons) 6,469,653 

Percentage of Total Pumped 0.8% 

Miscellaneous Hydrant Use 42,250 

Percentage of Total Pumped 0.0% 

Total Accounted For Pumped (Gallons) 772,978,811 

Percentage of Total Pumped 95.5% 

Unaccounted for Use (Gallons) 36,660,481 

Percentage of Total Pumped 4.5% 



The difference between accounted for and unaccounted for water 
consists of water lost to main and service breaks, fighting fires, 
street sweeping and theft. 



Water Distribution: 



The following new water mains were constructed in 2004: 



Water Mains Installed by Contractors Length Size Hydrants 

Nickerson Avenue 90 0' 2" to 8" 2 

Jacobs Street 250' 8" 1 



-56- 



Water Mains Replaced by Town Personnel Length Size Increase Hydrants 
Glendale Circle 1,000' 2" to 8" 2 

Total water mains installed in 2004 were 2,250 feet of 8-inch. There were 10 
fire hydrants and 39 services installed in the system. 

Sewer Collection System: 

The following new sewer mains were constructed in 2004: 

Sewer Mains Installed by Contractors Length size Type 

Mass Avenue (St. Paul Street) 127' S" Gravity 

Sewer : 



The department finished a thorough review of 30 miles of 6" through 36" 
diameter pipe, the entire Sewer Collection System, for leaks and structural 
deficiencies. We made several repairs to the most notable problems that were 
identified during this analysis. Sewer rehabilitation consisted of testing 
and sealing joints, manhole and invert grouting, manhole lining, frame and 
cover replacement and in- situ spot repairs. The repairs eliminated ground 
water from migrating into the sewer system. The results show the removal of 
an estimated 180,000 gallons per day of inflow and infiltration. In 
addition, the analysis gave us an inventory of the entire system noting size, 
length and condition. This information will enable us to focus funds for 
needed repairs and maintenance in the future. 



HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 

Library 

The year began with the public library as the focal point of community 
enthusiasm and pride. Six blue banners announcing "Wilmington Reads Empire 
Falls by Richard Russo" were hung in front of the library on Middlesex Avenue 
from January through March 2004. Wilmington's first town-wide reading 
program was a huge success. Readers checked out Empire Falls over 600 times. 
Over 300 people attended nine discussion programs and book related activities 
during the month of March. It was gratifying to receive so many positive 
comments such as, "I am proud to be a citizen of a town that has promoted 
such a wonderful and educational program for its community." Many residents 
commented about enjoying the opportunity to meet new people and hear 
different perspectives about the book at all the programs and events. 
Funding for this town-wide reading program was received from a federal grant 
through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners with supplemental 
funding and support from the Friends of the Library. In the summer of 2004, 
residents voted to read Snow in August by Pete Hamill for the 2005 Wilmington 
Reads, One Book, One Community program. We hope this program will generate 
the same level of community spirit as in 2004. 

It was also a banner year for other great programs at the library. Many of 
these programs were presented in collaboration with various Wilmington 
organizations. In March, the Wilmington Garden Club presented "Books in 
Bloom" at the library. Floral interpretations of ten different books, 
including Empire Falls, were created by members of the Garden Club and placed 
on display. Wilmington Historical Commission members Carolyn Harris and 
Terry McDermott, with Museum Curator Kathleen Black Reynolds, presented 
"Working in Wilmington" in October. The audience got a glimpse of Wilmington 
from the late 17*^^ century to the 1950' s. They learned about Wilmington as a 
farming community, about the famous Bond Cracker Factory that operated in 



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Wilmington Memorial Library 2004 




Discussion of Empire Falls at Russell Senior Center with High School 
students. 




Wilmington Reads Committee presents The Novels of Richard Russo. 



-58- 



Wilmington for many years and the Harriman Tannery that some local residents 
still remember for its pungent odor. The Friends of the Library also 
sponsored two programs that took the audience back in time to "Scollay 
Square" presented by David Kruh and to the "Golden Days of Television" 
presented by Mel Simon. 

"Vote! It Does a Nation Good!" was another successful collaborative 
initiative spearheaded by Teen Services Librarian Nathalie Demers to motivate 
local teens and their families to become informed and active in the 
democratic process. She coordinated activities with the Wilmington Middle 
School and High School and the Wilmington League of Women Voters. Funding 
support for this project was received from the Friends of the Library, the 
Wilmington Middle School PAC, the Wilmington High School PAC and Citizens 
Bank of Wilmington. The level of participation in this collaborative 
initiative is indicative of its success. Seventy-five teens and their 
families attended the visit of author, Janet Tashjian, whose new teen novel 
tells the story of a seventeen year-old Massachusetts boy who runs for 
president in 2004. Over 430 teens entered the "Vote! It Does a Nation Good!" 
writing contest; over 300 teens entered the "Vote! It Does a Nation Good!" 
art contest; and 1,130 teens voted in the Mock Election held at the 
Wilmington Middle and High Schools on October 28*^^. The finale "Election Day 
Party" on November 2"^* brought 70 teens and their families to the library. 
Representative James Miceli, who attended this program, announced that the 
local mock election winner was Senator John Kerry and that the winner of the 
national mock election was President George W. Bush. 

Collaboration between the public library and the public schools is critical 
for meeting educational goals. In September, the public library hosted a 
meeting with Superintendent of Public Schools William McAlduff, Assistant 
Superintendent Joanne Benton and all the school principals and school 
librarians. Senior library staff presented an overview of library services 
available to teachers and students. A demonstration of the library website 
and information about assignment alerts was provided. 

Other programs presented throughout the year inspired creativity and enhanced 
appreciation of the arts. In February, the Friends of the Library sponsored 
a program on the art of Winslow Homer and also a program on flower arranging. 
The Merrimack Valley Chorus of the Sweet Adelines presented a delightful 
musical performance at the library in April. That same month, the library 
received a record number of 247 entries based on the theme "food" for the 
annual poetry contest. Wanting to become more creative cooks, patrons 
quickly purchased tickets for "Appetizers for Holiday Parties," a program 
that sold out in a few days . 

The Children's Department presented 205 programs with a total attendance of 
6,740 children and parents. These programs featured music, art, theatre, 
crafts and of course, book discussions for all ages. The art contest that is 
part of the annual summer reading program received 72 entries this year with 
over one hundred people attending "Art Night" to view the art work of local 
artists of all ages. Under the direction of Children's Librarian Susan 
MacDonald, the Children's Department began a new program that provides young 
artists and writers with the opportunity to share their work for inclusion in 
a magazine published by the library. 

The library' s traditional preschool story time program introduced children to 
reading and the library continued to be popular and well attended. In 
response to requests from patrons, the Children's Department launched a new 
story time program for babies and their mothers (or caregivers) . Baby Times 
provides two separate programs depending on the baby's stage of development. 
Pre-Walkers is for babies not yet walking confidently on their own and 
Walkers is for babies up to the age of two who can participate in rhymes. 



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Wilmington Memorial Library 2004 




games and songs that involve the whole body. The response from both babies 
and mothers has been terrific. All the above programming involved hours of 
planning combined with the creative and enthusiastic efforts of a dedicated 
staff . 

Planning was the operative word in 2004. In May, the Board of Library 
Trustees initiated a long range planning process by presenting three public 
forums. The Board of Library Trustees decided that it was critical to gather 
input from residents about the quality of library services and gauge current 
public opinion about the need for a new library. Approximately 30 residents 
who attended these forums identified strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and 
threats to the library's mission. Participants agreed that the major 
weaknesses in library services were primarily in the library's facility. 
They identified such problems as inadequate space for collections, for quiet 
study, for meetings, for new technology and problems with accessibility. 
Having the 17 year old carpeting replaced in September was not only an 
aesthetic improvement but also created a healthier and safer environment for 
staff and patrons. Installation of a new air conditioning system will better 
regulate the heat and relative humidity in the building in years to come. 

A community based long range planning committee was formed in June 2004 that 
included town officials, staff. Friends of the Library and citizens at large. 
The long range planning committee also identified many of the same building 
issues that were mentioned in the public forums. As part of the long range 
planning process, a town-wide survey was mailed with the water bill in 
August, 2004. The library received 332 responses by the deadline at the end 
of the month. The results included many written comments from residents 
about the problems with the current facility and the need for a new library. 
Residents who completed the survey also had the opportunity to indicate the 
features that were most important in a new facility. Among the features 
considered to be most important include the following: quiet study areas, 
convenient book drop access, comfortable reading areas, better lighting and 
user friendly layout . 

With the announcement of a construction grant round in May 2004, the Board of 
Library Trustees realized that in order to move the library building project 
forward, the library site controversy had to be resolved. The Board of 
Library Trustees met with residents and with town officials regarding the 
original four sites that were evaluated in Library Feasibility Study 2002. 
On October 25, 2004, the majority of the Board of Selectmen voted to 
recommend the Swain School site across from the Town Common as the site for a 
new library. Following this vote of the Board of Selectmen, the Board of 
Library Trustees voted to recommend the Swain School site as the site for the 
new library. This recommendation was based on strong public sentiment to 
keep the library in the Town Common area. Keeping the library in the Town 
Common area is also supported by the Wilmington Master Plan, 2001. 

Planning for a new library once again got underway at the end of the year 
with the goal of meeting the February 9, 2005 deadline for the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Commissioners construction grant. In November 2 004, the 
Town Manager, Michael Caira, appointed a Library Building Committee that 
included representatives from the Library Trustees, Permanent Building 
Committee, School Department, Historical Commission, Planning and 
Conservation Department and Town Administration. In December, the Library 
Trustees held a public forum with architects from Tappe Associates to gather 
public input on design features for a new library. The Library Building 
Committee subsequently voted to select the option of new construction at the 
Swain School site instead of renovation of the 1914 school building. It is 
gratifying to see that support for the new library has been reinvigorated by 
a spirit of compromise through open dialogue and a common goal for improved 
library service to residents. 



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Wilmington Memorial Library 2004 




Terri McDermott, Katheleen Black Reynolds, and Carolyn 
Harris present Working in Wilmington. 





Cindy Mattson presents Dorothy 
Wilberg the prize from the Floiuer 
Arranging Program. 



Visit from 
Janet Tashjian, 
author of 
Vote for Larry. 




Meeting with public library staff and public school 
administrators and school librarians. 



Merrimack Valley Chorus of the 
Sweet Adelines perform at the library. 




Many individuals and groups should be acknowledged for time and effort in 
making a good library a better one for the community. The town-wide survey 
confirmed that the most important asset to the library is its staff. In 
answer to the question on the town-wide survey, "What do you like best about 
the library?" 98 respondents mentioned "staff", often with a supporting 
adjective such as: friendly, courteous, knowledgeable and helpful. This 
response was by far the one most often cited. This corresponded to the 94% 
satisfaction rating staff received for courtesy and knowledge on the check- 
off portion of the survey. 

The Board of Library Trustees met numerous times this past year to get plans 
for a new library back on track. All members are acknowledged for dedication 
to quality library service to Wilmington residents. Town Manager Michael 
Caira appointed Barbara Hooper to the Board of Library Trustees to replace 
Margaret Kane, who was elected to the School Committee in April. 

Thanks to the Friends of the Library for its continued support for the many 
programs offered at the library in 2004 and for the new outside bench and 
neon sign for the "Teen Zone." Gratitude is also extended to all the 
community organizations that donated to the library this past year. 

In 2004, a group of Wilmington citizens who believe that a new library is not 
only a good investment for the town but is critical to the well being of our 
community organized "Wilmington Library Advocates." With commitment and the 
enthusiastic efforts of all library advocates working together, a new library 
will be the ideal gift to Wilmington as it celebrates its 275'^^ Anniversary in 
2005 ! 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Administration : 

Christina A. Stewart, Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, Part-time Administrative Assistant 

Adult Services : 
Linda Callahan, Reference and Adult Service Librarian 
Linda Pavluk, Circulation Librarian 
Linda Harris, Adult Circulation Assistant 
Laurie Lucey, Part-time Reference Librarian 
Ruth Ellen Donnelly, Ann Deechan, Gail Ross 

Part-time Library Assistants 
Jennifer Corcoran, Joe Fagan, Alex Mooney, 
Christopher Murray, Jalisa Santiano 
Part-time Library Pages 

Children's Services: 
Susan MacDonald, Children's Librarian 
Barbara Michaud, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, Children's Circulation Assistant 
Nathalie Demers, Part-time Teen Services Librarian 
Barbara Bresnahan, Part-time Library Assistant 
Hannah Blaisdell, Ryan Curtis, Daniel Hall, 
Robert Hayes, Jessica Martin, Kate Stevenson 
Part-time Library Pages 

Technical Services : 
Charlotte Wood, Head of Technical Services 
Diane DeFrancesco, Technical Services Assistant 
Allison Forte, Technical Services Assistant 

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LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 2004 



Hours Open Weekly 

Winter 64 
Monday through Saturday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 
Summer 5 6 

Monday through Friday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 22,238 

Number New Patrons Registered 762 

Total Registered Borrowers 18,816 

Number of library visits 137,519 

Number of Items in Collection 85,745 
Items per capita 3.85 

Subscriptions 162 
Museum Passes 10 

Circulation 206,476 
Circulation per capita 9.28 

Interlibrary Loan 39,799 
From other libraries 21,307 
To other libraries 18,492 

Reserves 24,301 

Reference and Reader's Services 9,495 

Internet Use 9,721 

Meeting Room Use 319 
Library use 304 
Community use 15 

Library Programs 2 95 

Children's Programs 205 
Teen Programs 4 8 

Adult Programs 4 2 

Total attendance at programs 8,169 

Children's Programs 6,740 

Teen Programs 645 

Adult Programs 784 



-64 




Wilmiingtoe Arts Coiiocil 



Our goal for the little white building that sits at the top of the hill in 
front of the Wildwood Cemetery and across the street from the handsome 
Congregational Church is simple. We want everyone in town to know about the 
Wilmington Arts Center, to take art lessons, to see art shows, to listen to 
concerts, to hear piano recitals by their children and grandchildren, to make 
art and quilts, to rehearse their music and to enjoy the cultural benefits of 
our little town. This is the goal of the Wilmington Arts Council. 

One of our important duties is to grant funds to individuals and 
organizations who are involved in the arts. The Council works on this from 
October to January. For the year 2 04, we had the same amount of money to 
grant as 2003 - $2,540 from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. This is not 
a great deal of money and we had difficulty spreading it around for the best 
programs and the greatest number of people who would benefit from the funds. 
The Wilmington Council has set up local guidelines to help us decide who is 
to receive the funds. The funds this year went to the library for passes to 
the Museum of Fine Arts and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. We gave two 
grants to singers and musicians for seniors. A grant went to the Sweet 
Adelines for coaching and music lessons. And money for field trips to the 
Boston Museums was given to the Shawsheen Technical High School . Every year 
we hope for more grant money, so that more people will benefit. 

The Arts Council is very proud of the groups that use our building. The 
Merrimack Valley Chorus has been rehearsing there for over 15 years on 
Thursday nights. The Wilmington Garden Club has been holding several events 
there, including the popular Festival of Trees in December. We also have a 
new group using the building, the Stuart Highlanders, who use the hall on 
Wednesday night. In the summer, you may be able to hear the bagpipes 
playing! Once a month you may hear the hum of sewing machines (and laughter) 
as the Tewksbury Piecemakers take over the hall for a new-fashioned quilting 
bee . 

The Arts Center gives high quality art classes for adults. We have two 
wonderful watercolor teachers, both working artists, Louise Anderson and 
Carolyn Latanision. We also have a drawing class, taught by Valerie Borgal 
and an oil painting class taught by Pam Giarratana. Both women are terrific 
artists and teachers. In the spring of each year, Carolyn has an art show 
featuring her student artists. In June, the Council has another art show 
with more of our student's work. The public is welcomed to see these shows. 

Our grand acquisition of 2003 has lived up to its potential. The beautiful 
Yamaha has been played a great deal. Bruce Margeson has played several times 
for our annual Christmas Concert and our art show. He's now a regular! In 
2004, Carolyn Stanhope and Beth Murray, two of our local piano teachers, were 
able to use the grand piano for their student recitals for the first time. 
The children and their parents were very excited to be using such a quality 
instrument. The Arts Center was filled with parents and friends. 



-65- 




Vicky Zhao concludes her piano concert for the 
Wilmington Arts Council. 



In October of 2004, an exciting piano 
concert was performed by 16 year old Vicky 
Zhao. Vicky came to the United States only 
a few years ago and has been studying piano 
since she was five years old. She was 
considered a child prodigy in China and has 
won national awards in Canada. The Arts 
Council was pleased to be able to sponsor 
her first piano recital in the United 
States. She played music by Beethoven, 
Mendelsohn, Bach and Chopin. Her last 
piece was a romantic, Chinese love song 
which just blew the audience away. 
Wilmington can look forward to more 
concerts by Vicky Zhao. 

Other projects and events in 2004 were 
varied and many. Our 24'^'^ Annual Art Show 
was held in June with over 130 pieces of 
art. Monetary prizes were awarded for 
first place winners in each category. 
Categories included oil painting, 
watercolors, photography, mixed media and 
student work. The show is judged each year 
by working artists. Four pieces of art 
were purchased by the Arts Council for our 
permanent collection this year. Another 
Jeff Surrette of Shady Lane Art Studio 
The show was very well accepted. The Arts 



art show was held this year, 
exhibited his student's work 
Council sponsored the Continentals Band at the Wednesday night "Concerts on 
the Common" in July. A new and different group for next summer is in the 
works. Another young musician was featured in April. Casey Desmond played 
the guitar and sang her own songs for the Wilmington public. Robin and 
George Godding also played their wonderful brand of contemporary and folk 
music in February. 



In addition to our regular scheduled events - the arts shows, classes, 
rehearsals, etc, we have some new projects in the planning stages for 2005. 
Another classical piano program for the spring is being planned. A jazz 
program is being considered. A nationally known quilt artist may be giving a 
quilt show at the Center. These are some of the ideas we are looking at. 
Our big project for 2005 will be a new sign for the Arts Center with changing 
letters - one you can read from both sides! We are also planning a painting 
party for the members to spruce up the walls and. an increase of hangers in 
our hanging system. We are always planning ways to improve our historic 
building! We are also grateful for a new member this year. Barbara 
Forrestall, a retired elementary school teacher, has joined our group. 
Barbara, an avid quilter, brings a wealth of information from the educational 
side of giving out grants. 

The Wilmington Arts Council is always interested in hearing ideas from the 
public. Your input is always welcomed! We need your support! 



One of our members, Lucina Roark, has devoted her time to establishing the 
Arts Council website. It has our events, classes, artist's works and lots of 
information on it. You can access our website through the Town of Wilmington 
or www. geocities . com/ wilmingtonarts council . 



-66- 





Sarah Davis Jaquith was born in Wilmington, Massachusetts in 1832. She was 
married in Wilmington in 1874 to Cyrus Lewis Carter. They lived in a home on 
Main Street where the MassBank now stands. The house was moved and is now 6 
Middlesex Avenue . 

Before her death in November of 1907, she made a provision in her Will 
stating, "I give and bequeath to the Town of Wilmington the sum of Six 
Thousand Dollars in trust to invest the principle sum and to expend the 
income in maintaining courses of programs for the benefit of the people of 
Wilmington . " 

The Sarah D. J. Carter Committee was formed in 1910. Since that time the 
Committee has continued to bring to the people of Wilmington interesting and 
entertaining programs . 

The program for 2004 was presented on May 27 in the Middle School auditorium. 
Those in attendance enjoyed a slide lecture presentation by Michael Tougias 
called "New England's Wild Places and Forgotten History." 

The Sarah Carter Committee hopes to present a special program in 2005 to help 
celebrate Wilmington's 275th Anniversary. 




The Historical Commission continues to strive to preserve and conserve 
Wilmington's historical buildings and sites; and to educate our citizens of 
our town's rich history. 

This spring, long-time Commission member, Dorothy Lafionatis, was honored 
during a Selectmen's meeting for her countless contributions throughout the 
decades to Wilmington. As she has stepped down from her regular Commission 
duties, she was appointed "Historical Commissioner Emeritus." 

The Wilmington Historical 
Commission is very thankful to 
State Representative James 
Miceli and Senator Bruce Tarr 
for obtaining a State grant 
totaling $103,000 from the 
Massachusetts Bureau of 
Economics and Tourism. This 
grant is being used at the West 
Schoolhouse which is being 
refurbished through the 
combined efforts of the Public 
Buildings Department and 
Shawsheen Regional Vocational 
Technical High School. 



Carolyn Harris, Historical Commission Chairperson, 
inspects the progress of renovations at West 
Schoolhouse 

The Commission worked with the town's building inspector to develop a 
protocol which would enable the Historical Commission to be part of the 
demolition sign-off policy. This gives the Commission members the 
opportunity to tour, photograph and document any building before it is 
demolished. In this way, there will be a record of Wilmington's dwellings 
for future generations. 

-67- 




The Commission voted "to support the concept of the scenic road designation 
in Wilmington . " 

The Historical Commission was instrumental in having the Boutell -Hathorn 
House on Woburn Street placed on the National Register of Historic Places. 
The former farm, commonly referred to as the Richardson Estate, has 
historical and architectural significance as a farmstead representing 
Wilmington's agricultural history. 

The historic home plaque program is being continued in the four new historic 
districts . 

Members of the Historical Commission participated in the annual Friends of 
the Library historic program. This year's topic was "Industry In 
Wilmington." The speakers were: Carolyn Harris, "The Bond Cracker Factory," 
Kathleen Black Reynolds, "Wilmington's Agriculture," and Terry McDermott, 
"The Harriman Tannery." The Commission thanks the Friends of the Library for 
inviting them to share Wilmington's rich history through this lecture series. 

The Commission is looking forward to Wilmington's 275th Anniversary. Past 
historical publications are being reprinted and new books sponsored by the 
Historic Commission will be on sale. 

Memberships in the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Historic 
Massachusetts, the American Association for State and Local History and 
Historic New England were renewed. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission continues to administer to the 
Wilmington Town Museum at the Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern and support the work 
of the Museum Curator, Kathleen Black Reynolds. We were very pleased with 
the many programs, exhibits and educational community functions that were 
held during this past year. We enthusiastically invite all of Wilmington's 
citizens to visit and enjoy Wilmington's history as exhibited at the Museum. 

Members of the Historical Commission were proud to work with the Boy Scouts 
of Troop 136 as Matthew Marden worked on an Eagle Scout project. The work of 
the Boy Scouts in cataloging and displaying the museum's collection of tools 
in the Carriage House was well done and enhanced this very important museum 
exhibit. We look forward to further collaboration with the Boy Scouts and/or 
other civic groups interested in donating their time and efforts at the 
Wilmington Town Museum. 

The Commission expresses a "thank you" to the friends of the Harnden Tavern 
for their support. The Friends continue to work hard on programs and socials 
at the Museum. Their programs such as the Harvest Festival and Christmas 
Social bring the Harnden Tavern to life for the many citizens of Wilmington 
who come to enjoy a festive recreation of Wilmington's past. 

We wish to thank the volunteer members of the Garden Club for maintaining the 
Tavern's Herb Garden. We also wish to thank the Garden Club for choosing the 
Harnden Tavern as the site for a beautiful bench in memory of past Garden 
Club President, Sondra Koning. The dedication of this bench was held on 
October 3, 2004. In attendance were State Representative James Miceli, 
Garden Club officers and members, members of the Friends of the Harnden 
Tavern, the Koning family and many Wilmington residents. 

As always, the Historical Commission is thankful to the Town Administration, 
the Public Buildings Department and the Public Works Department for their 
continued support. 

Historical Commission meetings are held on the second Monday of the month at 
the Harnden Tavern or Town Hall (Room 4) . 



-68- 



Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern and Wilmington Town Museum 



The Museum enjoyed another year of support and patronage from residents and 
civic organizations. Local and distant visitors visited the Museum regularly 
during the monthly open houses . 

The museum benefited from the assistance of Rita Stynes Strow who 
participated in the Senior Tax Work-off Program. Ms. Stynes Strow provided 
research and articles for the museum's first and second editions of the 
museum's newsletter. 

In March, the Celtic Art Exhibit brought many visitors to admire the work of 
the same Ms. Stynes Strow. The artist's depiction of many Celtic legends 
brought much color and history to the Museum. The Historical Commission 
hosted two lectures at the Museum in April and May: "The Battle of April 19, 
1775" and "The Lore and Legend of New England Folk Songs." Local Cub Scouts 
made a visit to the Museum for a tour and activities. American Legion Boy 
Scout Troop 136 has been working on a permanent tool display in the Carriage 
House. Matthew Marden, an Eagle Scout candidate, and his troop members are 
organizing and researching the tools and will construct appropriate display 
cases for them. Many of these tools belonged to several farming families in 
Wilmington and will make a wonderful addition to the Carriage House. The 
Recreation Department sponsored two American Girl Doll Tea Parties in May and 
December. These are always well attended and offer a chance for adults and 
children alike to tour the Museum. A cobbler's tool exhibit was displayed 
for the latter half of the year. Upcoming exhibits will focus on the 
American Revolution, Civil War and the past celebrations of Wilmington's 
anniversaries . 

Over the summer. Dr. Charles Rounds, Jr., former Tavern resident, visited the 
Museum, shared his memories of growing up on the property and donated three 
photographs of the Tavern property as it existed in the early 1900s. 



Harnden Tavern Property, early 1900s 

The Friends' Harvest Festival held in October was another success. The 
Garden Club presented a memorial garden bench in honor of its past president 
Sondra Koning . Activities included candle making, apple pressing, milling 
flour; and refreshments included warm apple crisp, coffee and cider. The 
Jolly Rogues provided live music. In December, the Friends hosted their 
annual Holiday Social. The house museum was warmly decorated with greens, 
holly, ribbon, roses and other handmade creations. Music accompaniment was 
provided by a Wilmington High School harpist, Katelyn McFeeters, Barbara 
Zaino on the Eastlake Organ, and Warren Newhouse on guitar. 

In November, the Wilmington Middle School's Mentor Program participants 
visited the Museum for a tour and scavenger hunt. Participants included 
parents, mentees, mentors and the school's new curriculum coordinator. 




-69- 



Continuing goals include electrifying the barn, creating an organized storage 
space, cataloguing the Museum's inventory and coordinating educational efforts 
with the schools and other civic organizations. 

As always, the Museum staff is grateful for the time, talents and treasures 
of its patrons, volunteers. Historical Commission, Friends, library staff. 
Public Buildings, Public Works and MIS Department. The Museum and Friends 
are always in need of volunteers. If you have a skill or talent or treasure 
you would like to donate, please contact the Museum at your convenience. The 
Museum serves the public best when the public contributes to its mission of 
interpreting Wilmington's history. 



Number of Museum Visitors 

Functions 

Historical Commission 
Friends of Harnden Tavern 



Community Use 



Museum Programs 

Children's Programs 



Adult Programs 



Family Programs 



216 



Monthly meetings 

Monthly meetings 

October - Harvest Festival 

December - Holiday Social 

Recreation Department - American Girl 

Doll Tea Parties 

Middle School Mentor Program - site tour 
Kiwanis Club - annual holiday dinner 
Boy and Girl Scout troops - site tour 
Eagle Scout project 

American Girl Doll Tea Parties 
Boy and Girl Scouts - site tours 
Eagle Scout project 
Celtic Art Exhibit 
April 19, 1775 

Lore and Legend of New England Folksongs 
Middle School Mentor Program - site tour 
Kiwanis Club annual dinner 




The Recreation Department completed its 34th year of full-time operation. 
The Recreation Office is staffed with a full-time director, a full-time 
senior clerk and a part-time office assistant. The department is located in 
Room 8 at Town Hall. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday . 

Assisting and advising the department is the Recreation Commission. This 
volunteer board, which was formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy 
making capacity. Members are: Jay Tighe, Chairman; Charles Burns, Vice- 
Chairman; Maribeth Crupi, Secretary; Larry Noel and Sheila Burke. 
Commissioners are active in various related groups, committees and clubs 
throughout town . 

Although the Recreation Department remains small, with only two full-time 
employees, there are over 70 part-time and seasonal employees and dozens of 
volunteers who help to run the department's programs. The department offers, 
on a year-round basis, an ever-changing slate of activities for local 
citizens of all ages. 



-70- 



The Recreation Department tries to remain consistent with the following goals 
for the town: 

• provide opportunities for self-expression 

• offer programs which develop a sense of personal worth 

• provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 

• provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

• provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a 
certain amount of challenge to participants 

• teach skills in various activities that will have carryover value in later 
life 

• provide a variety of healthy and diversified programs 

• make programs as accessible as possible to all 

The department is funded by a variety of sources. The town-appropriated 
budget provides for a full-time director and clerk, a part-time office 
assistant, a portion of the summer Playground Program and some supplies. 
Program fees and donations heavily supplement the town-funded budget. We are 
pleased with our continued ability to offer high quality programs at 
extremely reasonable costs. We can accomplish this because we utilize fund- 
raising methods that act as recreational services as well. These services 
include: overnight and day trips and programs, the Town Hall soda and snack 
machines, the sale of entertainment books and discounted tickets to various 
recreational facilities. 



Volunteers are critical to the success of Recreation programs. Volunteers 
might find themselves doling out candy at the Horribles Parade, coaching a 
WRBL or Jr. Basketball team or teaching fathers and their children to fish. 
We appreciate our volunteer-minded residents, and most report that they gain 
on personal levels by volunteering. We also receive financial assistance 
from local businesses and organizations. Some of these valuable contributors 
include: Wilmington Rotary Club, Academy of Traditional Karate, Kiwanis, 
Textron, Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks, Wilmington Police Department, Lowell 5C 
Savings, Dandi-Lyons, Auxiliary Police, HRH Insurance, Massbank, Shriners, 
McDonalds, Dunkin' Donuts of 321 Main St., Dunkin' Donuts/Baskin Robbins, 
Council For The Arts, Designs By Don, Sons of Italy, CVS, Burger King, 
Wilmington 4"^ of July Committee, Woburn Street School PAC, CC & Sons 
Builders, Analog Devices, Citizens Bank, Reading Bank, Mass. Angler 
Education, Wilmington Fire Department, Brothers Pizza, A & A Industrial 
Supply, Compact Snacks, Lowell Lock Monsters and Wilmington Public School 
Food Services. We continue to search for innovative ways to generate funds 
to offset costs for the 
recreation consumer. 



The Recreation Department is 
involved, in varying degrees, 
with other recreation-oriented 
groups. In this capacity we 
serve as a quasi -consulting 
agency. We loan recreation 
equipment to families and 
groups for various functions. 
We act as an information source 
and referral agency answering a 
wide variety and large number 
of questions daily. 



Our basic program offerings for 
the year were : Santa ' s 
Workshop, Horribles Parade, 




Recreation Department Knitting Class. 



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Basketball League (WRBL) , Adult Gym, CPR and First Aid, Aerobics, Florida 
Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg Hunt, Summer Playgrounds, Tiny Tots, Fun With 
Music, Town Beach at Silver Lake, Canoe Rental, Tennis Lessons, Concerts on 
the Common, Fishing Derby, Teen Volleyball, Police Association Beach Day, 
Easter Coloring Contest, Sale of Entertainment Discount Books, Special Needs 
Tickets to the Shriners Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom, Latin and Swing Dancing 
Lessons, Children's Theme Parties, Top Secret Science Workshops, Kinder 
Karate, Karate, Kick Boxing and Boxing, Junior Basketball, Sale of Discount 
Ski Tickets, Summer Youth Basketball League, Indoor & Outdoor Golf Lessons, 
Letters from Santa, Junior and Intermediate Bowling 

Leagues, Babysitting Courses, Play Gym, Kids and Adult Craft Classes, Home 
Decorating Classes, Tai Chi, Angler Education, Yoga, Skyhawks Youth Sport 
Clinics, Model Airplanes Classes, Sailing and Kayaking, Rock Climbing, 35+ 
Basketball League, New Driver Instruction, Knitting, Kinder Sports, Kids 
Bingo Night and a Snow Sculpture Contest . 

In 2004, we offered 
reduced-rate tickets for: 
Celtics, Showcase and AMC 
Cinemas, Disney on Ice at 
FleetCenter, Barnum & 
Bailey Circus, 
Globetrotters, Topsfield 
Fair, Big "E", Water 
Country, Red Sox, Lowell 
Lock Monsters, Figure 
Skating Champions On Ice, 
Sesame Street Live, Bear 
In The Big Blue House, 
Boston Youth Symphony, 
Nashoba Valley Ski Area, 
Gunstock, Six Flags, the 
New England Flower Show, 
Lowell Spinners, B.B. 
King, Sound of Music, 
Beauty and the Beast, 
Aida, Blues Clues Live, 
Lord of the Dance and 
Bill Cosby. 

Our trips continue to grow in popularity. Day trips included: New York 
City, Connecticut Casinos (Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun) , Blithewold Mansion, 
Sail Rhode Island, Bourne Scallop Festival, Boston Duck Tours, Sturbridge 
Harvestfest, Peabody Essex Museum, American Girl Place, Martha's Vineyard, 
Yankee Candle and Bright Nights and a young adult trip to the Good Time 
Emporium. During the summer we took Playground and Tiny Tots participants on 
many field trip excursions. Theatre trips included: Boston Pops, dinner and 
Shear Madness, the Nutcracker, Mamma Mia, Movin' Out, Menopause the Musical, 
Blue Man Group, the Rockettes Christmas Spectacular and the Lion King. 
Overnight trips included: Indian Head Resort, Atlantic City, Las Vegas, Lake 
George Hot Air Balloon Festival, New York City, Foxwoods, Shenandoah National 
Park, the California Coast, Montreal and a cruise to Bermuda. 

We remain receptive to new ideas and trends. We update and add new programs 
each season depending on changes in demand and suggestions from residents. 
We continue to see an increase in the number of participants in many of our 
programs, particularly the programs for our youth. Our trips are enjoyed by 
seniors, adults and families and are increasingly in great demand. Arts and 
crafts programs for children and adults also continue to expand. 




The hula is in vogue at the Recreation Department's Hawaiian Luau Tea Party. 



-72- 



Some other groups that offer leisure programs in Wilmington are: Little 
League, Memorial Library, Elderly Services Department, Youth Hockey, Pop 
Warner, Figure Skating Club, Youth Soccer, Lacrosse, July 4"^^ Committee, 
Council for the Arts, fraternal and service organizations. Scouts, Campfire 
Boys and Girls, the Ristuccia Skating Rink and local schools and churches. 
The Youth Center at St. Thomas Church is available for pre-teens. 

The lack of commercial recreation in Wilmington, such as bowling alleys and 
movie theaters and the lack of agencies such as the YMCA and Boys '/Girls' 
Clubs stresses the importance of town support for this department, especially 
with a growing youth population and a growing demand for recreational 
activities . 




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services 

The year 2004 proved to be very successful for the Wilmington Department of 
Elderly Services. The department was extremely fortunate to receive a very 
generous bequest from Donald Blaisdell's estate. This donation has made it 
possible to make several improvements to the Buzzell Senior Center located on 
15 School Street. These improvements include: 

• New Sound System - in the large, main multi-purpose room. This enables 
elders with low functioning hearing to be able to hear at any location 
in the room, during our monthly commissioners meetings, educational 
seminar/workshops and entertainment . 

• Entertainment Center - large screen flat high definition T.V. along 
with DVD, VHS and stereo system. This enables the current video 
exercise class - that meets three times a week, easier visibility. 
This also gives the department the opportunity to have movie events and 
other special functions. 

• Improved Lighting - all new ceiling lights throughout the building and 
track lighting in the halls. 

• Lastly, making the large multi-purpose room more functional by 
expanding the wall between the kitchen and multi-purpose room. This 
makes the space more functional especially during large events. 

Additional improvements will continue throughout 2005 - as in purchasing new 
chairs and tables, refinishing the large multi-purpose room floor and a new 
carpet in the game room. 

To further compliment the Senior Center, a Wilmington resident - Stephen 
Tripp - painted a beautiful mural in the main entrance hallway. This mural 
is of several municipal buildings throughout the town (Mr. Tripp - 
representing Wilmington - was rewarded with a certificate of participation of 
the 8*^^ Annual Massachusetts Senior Citizens Holiday Card Competition) . To 
compliment the Buzzell Senior Center grounds - Girls Scout Troops - #1061, 
#11799, #67 and #918 planted over 300 tulip and daffodil bulbs for the elders 
to enjoy in the spring of 2005. This garden project was lead by June 
Thuillier, a volunteer from the department. 

The Town of Wilmington has 3,541 elders in our community age 60 and older a 
9.5% increase in five years. This makes the Wilmington Department of Elderly 
Services extremely committed in providing services to its elderly residents. 
These services include: information and referral, care planning and 
management, health and wellness services, transportation services, 
educational programs, counseling and family support services, financial and 
health insurance counseling and medical advocacy. 

The Town of Wilmington provides free transportation to all the Wilmington 
elderly residents 60 and over. This transportation is provided within a 
thirteen-mile radius of Wilmington. We have a full-time van driver to meet 
the transportation needs. In April 2003 the town, at the Annual Town 
Meeting, approved the purchase of a van that is equipped to handle a 
wheelchair along with its passengers. We are able to transport elders to 
their medical appointments, shopping and to the Senior Center just naming a 
few. The van continues to be a vital service to the elders of Wilmington. 
There were a total of 10,304 runs and 22,270 miles traveled to accommodate 
the elders this year. A full-time respite care worker further complements 
this service. She also provided needed transportation to medical 
appointments, but with one-on-one attention. She traveled 10,489 miles for 
the year 2004, making 386 home visits. This service is specifically for 
elders who are unable to be alone due to severe health conditions (cancer 
treatment, dialysis and dementia) and/or overall weakness. There has been an 



•74 



increase in the amount of elders that need on-going transportation, due to 
critical health issues. We are fortunate to have the respite care worker 
provide home visits to elders that are isolated and need regular "check- ins" 
to make sure they are all right. This position is a very vital role for the 
community. For the year 2004 there was an increase of social service needs: 
fuel assistance, health insurance issues, prescription costs (prescription 
advantage program) and protective service issues (23 elder abuse cases) . The 
director makes home visits to the most critical cases. This is to ensure 
confidentiality and to respond to the elders that are not able to get out of 
their homes. The possible reason for this increase is due to the strong 
appearance the department has developed in the community and the strong 
relationships with the Public Safety Department and private organizations in 
the area. 

Another vital part of the Department of Elderly Services is our home 
delivered meals program. This program has provided for the year 2004 - 
15,007 meals. This program provides the homebound elders of Wilmington with 
one hot meal five days a week, for the minimal cost of a dollar a meal. 
There are approximately 60-75 meals delivered daily, Monday through Friday, 
to the elders. Elders not only rely on these meals but also the daily 
contact. The drivers are responsible to come to the Senior Center after 
their deliveries to give an update on the elders they visit. The elders and 
their families are assured that if there should be a problem during the time 
of the delivery, the elder will be assisted and the families will be 
notified. The elders that are able to get out have the opportunity to have a 
hot lunch at the West Intermediate School congregate site. This not only 
gives them the opportunity for a hot meal but a time to see their peers. 
This year 1,960 meals were served. Making our food service program a very 
crucial part of the department's services - a total of 16,967 meals were 
served to the elders in our community. 




The Department of 
Elderly Services 
has had a great 
year and strong 
leadership with 
the Elderly 
Commissioners - 
John King, 
Chairman; Rosemary 
Cross, Vice 
Chairman; Joseph 
Filipowicz, Albert 
Lavalle, Joseph 
Paglia, Mary Smith 
and Frank Ratto. 
This year they 



have worked very hard in accomplishing their mission - they work closely with 
the Director and the needs of the elders of Wilmington. They have even 
placed their pictures in the main lobby of the Buzzell Senior Center to make 
elders more aware of whom they are and their function. One of the many 
things they accomplished this year was updating and approving the Department 
of Elderly Services by-laws. Several continue to be very active with our 
comprehensive and entertaining newsletter called the "Buzzell Buzz." We just 
celebrated our first anniversary of this newsletter. We now have a 50% 
increase in our monthly newsletter mailings. The newsletter can be found at 
the Buzzell Senior Center, the Town Manager's Office and the Wilmington 
Memorial Library. It not only provides information about the activities at 
the Senior Center but also assistance programs such as the pharmacy advantage 
program, fuel assistance program, food stamps, Medicaid applications and 
other types of services that are available to the elders in the community. 



-75- 



Another key part of the department is our Buzzell Senior Center. The center 
has an environment that is not only very inviting but also safe and enjoyable 
for elderly residents to be able to communicate with their peers and 
participate in many daily classes and activities. There were over 15,000 
elderly visitors this year who participated in the Senior Center programs 
such as: socializing, exercise classes, dance classes, ceramic classes, wood 
shop class and art class (water color painting) , walking group, nutrition 
class, computer classes, choir group and quilting group, just to name a few. 
Over 90% of these classes are lead by volunteers. These dedicated volunteers 
volunteer their time and energy. In April 2004 we had our Annual Volunteer 
Appreciation Luncheon for over 125 dedicated volunteers. We were fortunate 
to have Congressman John Tierney' s aide - Cheryl Gresek, who presented a 
Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition to all our volunteers. We 
also had Representative James Miceli present each volunteer a House of 
Representatives Citation. The guests included Town Manager Michael Caira, 
Selectmen Raymond Lepore, Suzanne Sullivan and Frank West - along with our 
Elderly Unit - from the Police and Fire Departments. 

We are fortunate to have the Board of Health Town Nurse, Ann FitzGerald, who 
visits the Senior Center weekly to provide blood pressure clinics, B-12 
shots, diabetic screenings and monthly cholesterol screenings. For seniors 
unable to make it to the Senior Center due to health ailments, she is able to 
make home visits. The Town Nurse also provides yearly flu shots at the 
Senior Center, Deming Way Senior Housing, elder's place of residence and the 
Town Hall . 

Other monthly services include podiatrist, hearing aid specialist, SHINE 
coordinator, Shear Pleasure 55 (hair stylist) and Attorney Nancy Hogan - free 
monthly consultations to seniors in need. Annually, volunteer accountants 
from VITA, beginning the first week of February through the first week of 
April, assist Wilmington elders with their taxes at the Reading Library. 
Last year there were 77 elders served through this program. Several of them 
were able to receive additional monies due to the new "Circuit Breaker" tax 
break . 

The Board of Health and the Department of Elderly Services work on several 
projects throughout the year. One such project is our Annual Health Fair. 
In April 2004, our 7'^*' year, we had "Law, Lunch and Lots of Health." It was 
decided to present the day in a different fashion. Due to many changes in 
elder law - there was a morning presentation by Attorney Nancy Hogan on very 
important elements that elders should obtain - Power of Attorney, Health Care 
proxy, HIPPA Medical Release and Comfort Care Order. We had a delicious 
lunch catered by Uptown Deli with several clinics to follow - blood pressure 
screenings, cholesterol screening, blood sugar screenings, nutritional 
information, osteoporosis information, skin care, diabetes updates and we 
were especially excited to have testing for bone density. The response was 
wonderful and many found it to be very informative. For 2004 there were many 
educational/informational seminars. The following are an example of what has 
been available - In February the American Lung Association presented "Chronic 
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease - How to Help Daily Living;" March Congressman 
Tierney and Cindy Phillips from Minuteman Senior Services came to present a 
program on "Medicare and the Many Changes;" May the Winchester Community 
Health Institute offered a 2 -part series on "Healthy Eating and Diabetes;" 
November "Getting Started: What to do When Your Family Member has Memory 
Loss" presented by the Alzheimer's Association; and "How to Age Successfully" 
presented by Dr. Alan Abrams a gerontologist from Whidden Hospital. 

Some of the continuing specialty programs are: The "Homebound Library 
Program" where the Senior Center was able to collaboratively work with the 
Wilmington Memorial Public Library and volunteers deliver books, tapes and 
videos to homebound elders on a regular basis. We also worked jointly on the 



town library event, Wilmington Reads "Empire Falls" - having a book 
discussion group which included the Wilmington High School students, elders 
and other Wilmington residents to have a fun discussion with different 
perspectives of the book. The center also has a "Food Pantry Box" where, on 
a weekly basis, donated food collected by the Senior Center is delivered to 
the Wilmington Food Pantry to assist the needy families in our town. Another 
service that has increased in demand is our "Medical Equipment Lending 
Program" where elders and their families can borrow needed equipment in order 
to stay at home safely and assist in curbing the cost of such equipment. We 
have wheel chairs, walkers, canes, bath chairs, benches and commodes. This 
year we have not only received calls from elders and their family members but 
also from the local Visiting Nurses Association that visit Wilmington 
residents . 

An exciting collaboration 
team that continues to 
strengthen in the Town of 
Wilmington is the Department 
of Elderly Services (Terri 
Marciello) , the Fire 
Department (Lieutenant 
Daniel Hurley) and the 
Police Department (Officers 
Julie Brisbois, Patrick 
Nally, Stephen Mauriello and 
Brian Pupa) . The focus of 
this alliance is to provide 
our elderly community with 
more contact points within 
the town government to 
address their needs and 
concerns. The Wilmington 
Police Department - Elder Services Unit - has been a huge support and 
strength to the Wilmington elderly residents. Some fun events were the 
musical "Kiss Me Kate" at the North Shore Music Center, a visit to Plymouth 
Plantation in June and in December the opportunity to see the "Rockettes" 
show at the Wang. They also provided a "File of Life Luncheon" and a 
presentation on "Identity Theft." This has been a wonderful opportunity not 
only for the elders to enjoy and be educated, but to keep the wonderful line 
of communication between elders and the Wilmington Police Department. These 
programs were made possible by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public 
Safety - Community Policing Grant. Also, the Wilmington Police Department 
Union sponsored a delicious luncheon served at the Senior Center, which gave 
another opportunity for the police and elders to mingle together. This has 
proven to be a successful endeavor not only for the elders of Wilmington but 
the partnership between the Elderly Services, Police Department and Fire 
Department . 

Also, the department wanted to be able to give back to the community, so a 
Wilmington High School Scholarship Fund was developed. In June 2 004, the 
elders presented our sixth annual scholarship to a high school senior of 
Wilmington High School who has an interest in social work and/or gerontology. 
This money was raised at our annual "Yard Sale." The seventh annual fan 
drive collected donated fans and air conditioners to share with elders that 
are in need. Our intent was to make sure that no senior went without some 
sort of relief from the heat. This year we were extremely fortunate with the 
amount of air conditioners donated. Finally, the Department of Elderly 
Services was overwhelmed by the generosity for our seventh annual holiday 
tree called the "Giving Tree." This tree gave the community the opportunity 
to help elderly people in their town. The outpouring of generosity was 
amazing - the many Wilmington families and residents, the Methodist Church, 




Senior Citizen trip to Plymouth sponsored by the Wilmington Police 
Department. 



-77- 



and the Boy Scouts Troop 56 giving $300.00 worth of gift certificates to the 
local grocery store, just to name a few. There were over 200 elders that 
received a gift from this event. The department has received an overwhelming 
amount of thank you notes that continue to come in. None of this happiness 
would happen if it was not for the outpouring of giving as we see in the Town 
of Wilmington. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their 
generous donations in 2004: Dunkin' Donuts for their daily supply of donuts; 
Tewksbury/ Wilmington Elks for their Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that served 250 
seniors this year; Saint Thomas Church and parishioners for the homemade 
Thanksgiving dinners personally delivered to the homebound, Rotary for their 
monthly donations for financially strapped elders and the Rotary Interactive 
Group for their Valentine's Day event for the elders at the Senior Center; 
Lions Club for all they have contributed throughout the years; the Kiwanis 
Club for a lovely catered dinner in June for 100 elders at the Senior Center; 
Brownie Troop 331 for the "Classic Lady's Tea;" the Wilmington High School 
Chorus for a live holiday performance at the center; William Cavanaugh, owner 
of Cavanaugh' s Funeral Home, for the yearly donation of 10 popular magazine 
subscriptions; and to all the clubs and businesses who donated for raffles 
and give-a-ways. 

Thanks to the Town Manager, Michael Caira, and all town department heads for 
their help and ongoing assistance. Thanks to the seniors who volunteered 
hundreds of hours visiting elders in their homes, hospitals and nursing 
homes; for the volunteers who delivered holiday catered meals (200 meals in 
total) to the homebound; and to the instructors that volunteer faithfully 
every week to instruct classes and programs and the volunteer participation 
at the Massachusetts Council on Aging Conference held for the first time in 
our region. Thanks to all that made it possible for our seventh year of the 
"Giving Tree" to be a huge success. Lastly, thanks to all who gave their 
time and money in making the Senior Citizen Holiday Fair a success again this 
year . 




Annual Holiday Craft Fair. 



-78- 



Hou: 



sm 




Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR 
(Code of Federal Regulations) ; Chapter 30B of the State Procurement Law and 
State and Federal Code of Ethics. A five-member Board of Commissioners, 
consisting of four elected and one state appointed member, oversees the 
Authority's policies and procedures. The Executive Director is charged with 
the administration of these procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 68 seniors, and a congregate unit in conjunction with 
CMARC of Woburn, MA, along with 13 (705) families of conventional three- 
bedroom housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives first 
preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also services 
the Federal Section 8 housing Choice Voucher Program. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough 
housing for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally 
independently but who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington 
Housing Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive 
home care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed. We look to the endeavors of the 
state to provide adequate funding to maintain the quality of life in our 
aging state developments and to the town to provide ways to provide 
additional housing for this ever-growing population. 

Cuts in the state budget for Local Housing Authorities for the last three 
years directly impact the Housing Authority' s budget and ability to continue 
to make quality improvements. Zero cap bottom-line budgeting only allows 
agencies to make necessary improvements or emergency repairs . 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life- threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. We would also like to extend our appreciation to 
the Wilmington Department of Public Works for their assistance in keeping our 
roads clear during the inclement weather. Also to Michael Caira, Town 
Manager, and all the town employees who bring a better quality of living to 
all our tenants. 



The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities is a commission established to 
advocate for and address the issues and concerns of the disabled community, 
their families and other interested parties. 

The Commission continues to attend conferences and training sessions, 
especially in conjunction with the Massachusetts Office on Disability and the 
Northeast Independent Living Program (NILP) . We keep abreast of new 
legislation and make sure proper authorities are also aware. 

The Commission assisted residents through information and referral for 
concerns regarding home accessibility, employment, transportation, service 
animals, housing assistance and independent living. The Commission responded 
to complaints of access issues in town and assisted private business with 
site surveys. We continue to survey sites and assess compliance with 
architectural accessibility for people with physical, visual, hearing or 
other disabilities in accordance with the Massachusetts Architectural Access 
Regulations and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. 




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Veterans' Services 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 
115, as amended, with strict compliance to this chapter, the rules and 
policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran and his/her immediate family who have been 
subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval comes from the State 
Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, MA. 

Total funds expended for aid to veterans and their families for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 2004 was $6,013.26. Funds appropriated for the fiscal 
year 2005 total $11,000.00. The amount expended during the first six months 
of 2005 was $3,988.22, leaving a balance of $7,011.78 for the remainder of 
the fiscal year. 

Additional benefits expended by the Veterans' Affairs Administration directly 
to the veteran population in Wilmington were $3,230,000.00 for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 2004. This represents the amount of tax dollars not 
required to be expended for those who, because of the circumstances, find it 
necessary to apply for aid. 




Veterans'' Monument at Town Common. 



Board of Health 

The office of the Board of Health is located in the Town Hall at 121 Glen 
Road in Room 5 and the Public Health Nurse's office is located off of the 
foyer of the Town Hall. The Board of Health consists of three members 
appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. Serving on the 
Board in year 2004 were Elizabeth (Libby) Sabounjian, James Ficociello, 
D.D.S. and Jane Williams-Vale, M.D. The Director of Public Health is Gregory 
Erickson, R.S., C.H.O. The Health Inspector is Shelly DelGenio, C.E.H.T., 
the Public Health Nurse is Ann FitzGerald, R.N. and the Animal Inspector is 
Ellen Davis. The secretarial staff consists of Linda Reed, Toni LaRivee and 
Wendy Martiniello. 

The administrative duties of the office include issuing permits, reviewing 
plans for subdivisions, septic systems and other development proposals, 
issuing enforcement orders, issuing citations, holding hearings and keeping 



-80- 



records, attending meetings, operation of the Board of Health website and 
other regular administrative duties. The Board of Health meetings were 
generally held once monthly, on the third Tuesday of each month and usually 
at 6:00 p.m. Records of all meetings and other documents are kept at the 
office of the Board of Health. 

Environmental field activities of the Director and the Inspector included 
inspection of restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial 
buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, the Fourth of July activities, 
caterers and other temporary food stands, percolation tests and soil 
evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal system inspections, nuisance 
complaint investigations, hazardous waste investigations, housing 
inspections, lead paint determinations, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, 
lake water quality sampling, Canada geese control, beaver control and other 
miscellaneous investigations. 

The Board of Health hosted the Department of Environmental Protection annual 
seminar, which was held at the Wilmington High School. This annual seminar 
is conducted for health officers of the DEP North East Region. 

The Title 5 Septic System Betterment Loan Program, which began in 1999 and 
has continued every year thereafter, received funding again in 2004. The 
Board of Health was able to give financial assistance for the repair and 
upgrade of three septic systems and one sewer connection, totaling loans of 
$55,110.00. Loans were made to homeowners, which are to be repaid to the 
town through the betterment process. This was made possible by a $200,000 
grant directed by DEP and the Massachusetts Environmental Trust and will 
continue into 2005. 

The Board of Health Canada Geese Control Program has continued operations 
throughout the year in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Fish 
and Wildlife and there has been a significant improvement in the condition of 
our school grounds and playing fields. 

In a continuing effort to control the environmental impact of elemental 
mercury, an additional program of collecting mercury for recycling was begun 
in 2004. In addition to the existing program of exchanging fever 
thermometers for a digital thermometer at no charge and the receiving of 
mercury switches and thermostats, we have expanded the program to include the 
recycling of mercury containing fluorescent light tubes. There are now 
recycling containers located at all of the schools and public buildings. 

Working with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) Bioterrorism 
program, the Board of Health received a grant of $5,212.57 for various 
upgrades to Board of Health infrastructure and additional equipment which is 
valued at approximately $5,000. The Director served on the Executive 
Committee of Bioterrorism Region 4A. 

The annual rabies clinic for dogs and cats was held on April 3, 2004 at the 
Public Buildings Department (formerly the Fire Department Building) on Church 
Street. A total of 235 animals (dogs and cats) were inoculated with rabies 
vaccine . 

The Public Health Nurse, Ann FitzGerald, R.N. collaborated on two Health and 
Wellness Programs. The first was an Employee Health Fair which was held on 
May 4*^^ in coordination with the School Health Services Director, Mrs. Doreen 
Crowe, R.N., Blue Cross Blue Shield representatives, 10 senior nursing 
students from the University of Mass. Lowell, who provided posters, 
literature and information on the following topics: skin cancer prevention, 
as well as the Dermascan with RN interpreter provided by Blue Cross, breast 
and women's health, prostate and men's health, lung and respiratory health 
and cardiovascular health. Additional screenings were for blood pressure, 
cholesterol and blood sugar. Special thanks to Pam Cote, RD, Police and Fire 
Personnel and Town Manager's staff for healthy snack preparation. 



-81- 



The second program coordinated with Terri Marciello, Director of Elderly- 
Services, was the Senior Health Fair which was held on September 23, 2004. 
Screenings included blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and a bone 
density screening for osteoporosis provided by the Osteoporosis Team 
Winchester Hospital Community Health Institute. 

Adolescent Hepatitis-B immunization initiative continues in the Middle 
School. Twenty-one doses were administered during the year 2004. Other 
immunizations totaling 45 were given in the nurse's office. 

Due to vaccine supply issues, 586 doses of flu were administered in 2004 and 
vaccinations will continue into January of 2005 until the serum is exhausted. 
A total of 10 pneumonia injections were given. 

Medicare B reimbursement for 2004 was $1,344.20. Mantoux skin testing for 
tuberculosis visits declined due to repeal of education law requiring all new 
school personnel to have a current TB test. There were 69 tests administered 
in 2004. 

An increase in the number of cases of exposure to Hepatitis A, a food borne 
viral infection, which is infectious, has prompted the Hepatitis A Prevention 
Program for food service workers. Vaccine is purchased by the restaurant 
owner at CDC rate from the drug manufacturer and administered by the public 
health nurse in two doses six months apart. Forty restaurant employees have 
been immunized in 2004. 

Four confirmed cases of Pertussis or Whooping Cough have been reported in 
2004, as well as many cases of post vaccination Varicella (chickenpox) . 

We participated in joint program with the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health and Boston University School of Public Health in a mentoring program. 
Spencer Weppler, a graduate student, helped the Board of Health in the 
development of a local Bioterrorism response plan at no cost to the town. In 
doing so, we received a grant for $1,500 for a new computer for the Public 
Health Nurse. 

The Public Health Nurse completed Smallpox Vaccine Training, Isolation and 
Quarantine Response and Environmental Health workshops. 

The Public Health Nurse continues involvement in the Department of Public 
Health Community Health Network (CHNA-15) , which is a group of twelve towns 
that work together on Healthy Community related issues. Wilmington Public 
Schools and Mrs. Doreen Crowe, R.N. , received a $7,000 grant from Lahey 
Clinic Community Benefit Initiative and CHNA-15 for a program "Food, Mood and 
Sex," presented in three workshops by Ms. Pamela Cantor, psychologist. 
Harvard Medical School. Results indicate a need for additional support for 
children and parents on those issues. 

The Director served as a member of the Board of Registration of Sanitarians 
for the Commonwealth and continued as a member of the Executive Board ex- 
officio for the Massachusetts Health Officers Association. 

A. Communicable Disease Control: 



1. Immunizations administered 40 
Office-Flu vaccinations administered 10 
Home-Flu vaccinations administered 60 
Clinic-Flu vaccinations administered 416 
Pneumovax administered 4 
Hepatitis B vaccinations administered 26 
Flu vaccine doses distributed 350 
Fees Collected (Medicare B) $4,115.67 

2. Communicable Diseases Reported 100 
Home Visits 



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3. Tuberculosis Cases 3 

Office Visits 68 

Home Visits 

B . Public Health Nursing : 

1. Premature births/Newborn Report 

2. Morbidity-V.N.A. Calls/Office Visits 8 

3. General Health Supervision/Home Visits 136 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 177 
Telephone/Health Conference Calls 657 

4. Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 204 

5. Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 3 

6. Bone Density Screening 13 
Diabetes Series 3 
Blood Pressure 204 
Cholesterol 17 

7. Senior Counseling/Drop- In Center 

Number of Sessions 44 

Hypertension Screenings 583 

Diabetic Screenings 69 

General Health (injections) & Counseling 125 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screenings 23 

8. Blood Lead Testing 

9. Blood Analyzer Testing Clients 8 
Total number of tests 24 
Fees Collected $34.20 

10. Meetings 95 

11. Vaccine Distribution 15 

12. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $1,378.40 

C . Environmental Health: 

1. Transport /Haulers $3,300.00 
Stables 240.00 
Miscellaneous permits 107.20 
Percolation testing 9,650.00 
Sewage system permits 10,200.00 
Food establishment permits 7,420.00 
Installers permits 3,800.00 
Sub-Division reviews 200.00 
Massage Therapy/ Funeral Directors 200.00 
Copies 
Court witness fees 

Nurse's total fees collected $1,378.40 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $48,699.67 

2. Meetings Attended 272 

3. Disposal Works Construction Inspections 288 

4. Number of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 40 



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5. Number of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 108 

6. Food Establishment Inspections 

Food Service 59 

Retail Food 5 

Residential Kitchen 1 

Mobile Food 3 

7. Food Establishment Re- Inspections 

Food Service 16 

Retail Food 9 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 

8. Nuisance Complaint Inspections 69 

9. Nuisance Complaint Re-Inspections 45 

10. Housing Inspections 19 

11. Housing Re-Inspections 7 

12. Percolation Tests 183 

13 . Court Appearances 3 

14. Hazardous Waste Investigations 6 

15. Camp Inspections 2 

16. Miscellaneous Inspections 78 

17. Lead Inspections 
19. Title 5 Inspection Reports Received 206 



Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

In June the Board of Selectmen appointed a new Cable TV Advisory Task Force. 
Serving on that task force are: residents Quincy Vale and Wayne Aruda, Donna 
Gacek Executive Director of WCTV, Louise Leland, Technology Coordinator with 
the Wilmington School Department and Jeffrey Hull, Assistant Town Manager. 

The Board was notified by Comcast in April of its desire to initiate cable 
license renewal discussions. Starting in the fall the task force has been 
meeting to prepare for the information gathering process known as 
ascertainment. Prior to official negotiations the task force must identify 
the needs of the community with respect to cable service. Task force members 
have met with Brian Merrick, a representative from the state Cable Television 
Division, to understand the requirements for cable license renewal. 

Public hearings will be conducted to solicit opinions from residents and 
cable subscribers with respect to their satisfaction concerning the existing 
level of cable service and their desires for future service. 

The current cable license is a 10-year license which expires on March 24, 
2007 . 



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Sealer of Weights aod Measures 



The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the Town of Wilmington: 



Type of Device 



Number Sealed 



Gas Meters 




107 


Small Capacity Scales 




60 


Scales from 30-300 lbs. 




555 


Truck Scales 




7 


Oil Truck Meters 




2 


Pharmacy Weights 




41 


Sign Inspections 




4 


Oil Delivery Observations 




23 


Consumer Complaints Received and 


Acted on 


6 


Gas Station Sign Checks and Pump 


Readouts 


21 


Collected 




$1, 720 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures maintains fairness in the market place. 
Again, this year there was an increase in the monitoring of oil truck 
deliveries during the winter. One consumer complaint involved the State 
testing of proper grades of gas being sold. The Sealer will attend state 
workshops to maintain certification. 





Wilmington employees 
join town residents in celebrating 
World Series victory. 









ifwswmii 


: m 


1! 







-85- 



EDUCATION 




The Wilmington Public School System is in the midst of one of the most 
exciting periods in its history. Our students already live in a world that 
is significantly different from the one in which most of us grew up, a world 
that is changing faster than any of us could have anticipated. They are 
facing a world that is global, technologically oriented and knowledge -based . 
This changing environment impacts how our school system prepares students for 
their tomorrow. 

In Wilmington, we are dedicated to implementing curriculum, instruction and 
assessment practices designed to help all students reach their full 
potential. To this end, we continually refine curriculum (what we teach) to 
ensure that it is current, relevant and aligned with state and national 
standards . We engage in ongoing professional development to improve our 
instructional repertoire (how we teach) so that we are reaching and 
challenging ALL learners. We search for better ways to measure and evaluate 
student achievement so that assessments become tools that further advance the 
learning process . 

The Wilmington School System strives for educational excellence by creating 
exciting learning environments for our students, demanding the best from our 
talented staff and fostering cooperation and collaboration between our 
schools and the town. Wilmington is a community that has always valued 
education as an investment in our town's future. The school children of 
Wilmington and our public schools continue to benefit from these efforts. 

The mission of the Wilmington Public Schools is to provide a student -centered 
education which fosters critical inquiry enabling the individual to be a 
productive citizen, respect of self and others, capable of adapting to a 
changing world and its technology. The district continues to place emphasis 
in the following areas: student behavior management, technology, 
professional development, standards -based curriculum, communication with 
community, adequate funding, adequate facilities and instructional materials 
and family partnerships. Our energies are focused on preparing our students 
to be : 

• Effective communicators who receive, interpret and convey knowledge and 
ideas clearly and purposefully in a variety of modes. 

• Innovative and creative problem solvers who use inductive and deductive 
reasoning to address current and emerging issues, organize and analyze 
information and pursue promising solutions with flexibility. 

• Self -directed learners who understand themselves and their intrinsic 
worth; make informed choices concerning their cognitive, physical and 
emotional well being; and monitor and accept responsibility for their 
continuous learning. 

• Collaborative workers who use interpersonal and leadership skills to 
work effectively with peers and groups to accomplish common goals. 

• Responsible and informed citizens who contribute actively to the good 
of their local and global environments. 

• Cultured individuals who understand, appreciate and respond to the 
aesthetics of the arts, literature and the natural world. 



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The district continues to see improvement in student achievement. On the 
2004 Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) , 92% of the lO"^*^ 
grade students successfully met the Competency Determination; that is, they 
passed both the English/Language Arts and the Mathematics exams. This is an 
increase of 6% from last year's class. In addition, ten additional students 
passed the English/Language Arts test and two passed the Mathematics test. 
There are seven students who have not yet passed both tests. 

Specific findings for each school from the Spring 2004 MCAS tests include the 
following : 

• Wilmington High School, North Intermediate and West Intermediate met 
their Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determination for both 
English/Language Arts and Mathematics, the aggregate population and all 
subgroups . 

• While the Wilmington Middle School met its target for the aggregate 
population in English and Mathematics, it did not make AYP in 
Mathematics for special education students. 

• The Shawsheen and Woburn Street Schools met their target for Reading in 
all subgroups. 

We have encouraged parents, teachers and students to keep the MCAS tests and 
the test results in perspective. They are one measure of how well a child, a 
school or a district is performing in the subject areas tested, to be 
considered alongside other indicators of progress. Our teachers use a range 
of assessments including classroom tests, teacher observations, department 
mid-term and final exams, essays portfolio assessments and demonstration 
projects to gauge a student's performance and development and to inform our 
thinking about curriculum and instruction. Principals and curriculum leaders 
will use student, school and district results extensively to review 
curriculum and instruction and plan for improvement. 

As part of Education Reform, the Department of Education issues a School and 
District Accountability System School Performance Rating Report every two 
years based on MCAS and other indicators. In the Fall of 2004, the Mid-Cycle 
AYP Report (Adequate Yearly Progress) indicated that the Wilmington Public 
Schools was identified for improvement in Mathematics for a subgroup of 
students with disabilities. The Curriculum and Instruction Office is working 
with the individual schools to put into place a plan to help these students 
meet with success. 

Curriculum work has continued at all levels. A K-12 core curriculum has been 
articulated for all major subject areas. A major curriculum improvement has 
been the ongoing piloting of two Language Arts Anthologies for grades K-5. 
It is our hope to bring to the School Committee in the spring a 
recommendation for a system wide adoption of one of these anthologies. 
Extensive professional development continues to be provided to teachers to 
support their teaching of this standards -based curriculum. The system is 
continuing to look at a new mathematics program for the Wilmington Middle 
School . 

Wilmington Public Schools have placed a major emphasis on technology. Thanks 
to the generosity of the Town of Wilmington we were able to expand the 
primary school computer labs to 23 stations and the intermediate labs to 25 
stations. In addition, seventy-five computers were purchased for the high 
school to increase teachers' access to this valuable tool. 



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The Wilmington Public Schools take its mission most seriously and will pursue 
its commitment to excellence in all aspects of its educational program. We 
are dedicated to ensuring that our schools are safe, nurturing and responsive 
places where all students can thrive and excel. Our goal is to continue 
supporting initiatives that create equitable classrooms that address the 
needs of learners of all abilities, continue to provide teachers with support 
and skills in differentiated instructional techniques and employ economical 
and cost effective ways to address our students' needs. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

There was a big change at Wilmington High School this year with the 
retirement of Principal, Edward J. Woods and the hiring of Mr. Eric Tracy to 
fill his shoes. This change has put Wilmington High School into a transition 
year with the goal of working to begin to develop a solid foundation of 
excellence for the future. A number of goals were set by the School Advisory 
Council in May of 2004 that have helped to keep Wilmington High School a safe 
and quality educational environment. The goals include the areas of 
curriculum, safety, communication, student and staff recognition and 
technology . 

School safety continues to be a priority. The continued implementation of 
the Code 159 lockdown program has been successful. We have also instituted a 
software based program which will help us to keep vital student information 
on a Palm Pilot. The software updates in conjunction with our student 
management software, which helps us to keep the most accurate data. Each 
administrator, as well as our School Resource Officer, will have a Palm Pilot 
that allows all student information to be 100% portable in a unit that fits 
in a shirt pocket. 

A technology improvement, new computers for our teachers, has dramatically 
improved communication in and out of the building. We have also made a 
commitment to improve communication between Wilmington High School and home 
by changing the format of our quarterly newsletter and creating a one-way 
e-mail list so parents can receive important information in a timelier 
manner. We will continue to offer opportunities to showcase our school as 
well as develop programs to help our students, parents and members of the 
community learn more about all we have to offer. 

Due to retirements and people moving on, we had the opportunity to hire 
thirteen (13) new staff members before the 2004-2005 school year started. 
They are a talented group with diverse backgrounds in and out of education. 
Each new member brings a wonderful new dynamic and increased energy to a very 
dedicated staff. Many of the new teachers have already been involved with 
various activities outside of the classroom, coaching, advising and working 
to develop new programs for our students to continue their growth in the area 
of community service. 

Our School Advisory Council has been busy working on the Parent/Student 
Handbook, as well as facilitating some changes to the rank in class policy. 
Their responsibility at the high school will be to continue to work with the 
principal in an advisory role to raise the quality of our programs as well as 
aligning each of our goals with the school mission as required by the NEASC 
accrediting agency. 

We continue to celebrate the accomplishments of everyone at Wilmington High 
School. The Student of the Month program's success has opened the door for 
us to begin the Teacher of the Month program also. The Principal's Cup, a 
new competition open to each of the four (4) current classes, will look to 
support improved attendance while reducing tardiness to school. Points will 
also be awarded for the class with the most students who have a 90 or greater 



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High School students 
returned to a brand 
new track. 



average during the first three (3) quarters. The final component will be the 
most spirited class as voted by the staff and faculty. Our recognition 
program continues to grow with the addition of recognition for teachers who 
have taught in the system for thirty (30) or more years. Wilmington High 
School teachers will be honored with a plaque in the front lobby that will 
mark the first addition to the "Wall of Honor." 

To date, our athletic teams and performing arts programs have had outstanding 
seasons. Our teams, bands and clubs continue to raise the bar for Wildcat 
spirit and pride. 

Looking towards the future, the staff and faculty of Wilmington High School 
will begin the transition to becoming a model school. Raising academic 
standards as well as adding excellence to all of our programs will help to 
make Wilmington High School a great school and quality representative of the 
Town of Wilmington. 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 

The English Department offers many programs, courses and activities for 
students, as well as for faculty. This year students receive additional 
instruction in MCAS review courses during and after the school day. Students 
have the opportunity for tutoring to work on skills in reading comprehension, 
writing for open responses and practice for long compositions. Also, a SAT 
review course is offered to prepare students for the new SAT. The new SAT 
will include writing in response to a prompt, sentence completions and 
critical reading passages. Students practice test taking skills and 
strategies that improve their performance on these tests, as well as in the 
classroom. 

All sophomores and freshmen are required to take an MCAS practice long 
composition during the mid-year exam period. The purpose of this activity is 
to simulate the testing situation and to provide feedback to students about 
their writing. The essays are scored by a team of teachers who have been 
trained in the holistic scoring process used by the state in scoring 
compositions . 

Our literary magazine enters its third year of publication. Expressions , 
whose advisor is Miss Tammy Ross, encourages students to be creative in a 
variety of mediums. The new elective Creative Writing provides students with 
the opportunity to study different forms of writing, to have professional 
feedback and to polish their writing skills. 

A grant from the Wilmington School/Business Partnership will present a live 
theater production of Our Town by Brandeis University/New Rep on Tour at the 
high school auditorium in February. This performance of Our Town by Thornton 
Wilder will complement the classroom study of drama and allow students the 
opportunity to engage with professional actors and actresses. 

Many professional opportunities are available for staff. In-service 
workshops in literature for the middle school and high school classrooms have 
an enrollment of 40 staff members. These courses are book discussion groups 
that analyze new texts and strategies that can be incorporated into 
classrooms. Also, staff members participate in the scoring of practice long 
compositions using state rubrics and guidelines. Also, curriculum revision 
is ongoing so that all students have challenging, relevant and beneficial 
experiences in their English classrooms. 



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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

The Mathematics Department at Wilmington High School is comprised of 11 
teachers, 6 of whom are veterans, each with more than 25 years of experience. 
We have two new members of the Mathematics Department this year, one who has 
most recently taught at Peabody High School and the other from Everett High 
School . 

The courses offered in the Mathematics Department range from Algebra 1 
through AP Calculus. A large percentage of Wilmington High School students 
complete four years of Mathematics, although the requirement is three years. 
Students will complete a three year program with Algebra 2 and may choose a 
fourth year of Mathematics from one of our senior electives which include 
Programming, Math Topics, Advanced Math Topics, Analysis, Trigonometry and 
Probability and Statistics. Those students who have entered our Honors 
Program from Grade 8 will complete their three year requirement with Honors 
Analysis and may choose to continue in their senior year with either Honors 
or AP Calculus. We have also had many students enroll in two Mathematics 
courses in one year in order to advance to Calculus in their fourth year. 

The Mathematics and English Departments also offer an SAT Review Program two 
times during the school year. This program is designed to prepare students 
for the November and May SAT testing. The review sessions are held during 
the six weeks prior to the testing dates. Courses are offered in the early 
evenings during the week and on Saturday mornings . 

Math League is again a popular activity for college bound students who have 
an interest in the mathematics field. Wilmington High School is a member of 
the New England Mathematics League and holds monthly contests which include a 
variety of challenging problems. Approximately 50 students are presently 
enrolled. Students may choose to participate at any time during the school 
year . 

We continue to improve in our standardized testing. MCAS results were very 
positive this year with 73% of our tenth graders achieving either Proficient 
or Advanced status. We continue to offer a "Math Workshop" course to our 
tenth graders as a preparation for the May exams. This course is designed to 
reinforce skills and to develop test-taking strategies. We have also offered 
several programs during the first several months of school to help students 
to prepare for the November Retest. 

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

The Science Department staff spent considerable time in the beginning months 
of 2004 developing and refining elements of the science curriculum. 
Specifically, all course descriptions were finalized and brought into 
alignment with the Massachusetts State Science and Technology/Engineering 
Curriculum Frameworks and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges 
recommendations for performance standards and rubrics. In addition, 
curriculum maps for each course were developed to include content, skills and 
processes and assessment on a month-by-month basis. These curriculum 
documents were developed to help insure alignment with state guidelines, 
provide equity in the instruction of all students and serve as a critical 
communication tool for teachers, administrators and parents. 

In May, two students in Mr. John Wood's chemistry classes earned awards in 
the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 2004 Poster/Writing Contest for 
their essays. The students and their teacher were recognized in an awards 
ceremony held at the MWRA center on Deer Island with parents and dignitaries 
in attendance. 



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In May, biotechnology and AP biology students visited CityLab at Boston 
University under the guidance of their teachers, Mrs. Dawn Martell and Mr. 
Richard Fardy respectively. The purpose of CityLab is to provide students 
with hands-on experience in cutting edge biotechnology and forensics science 
procedures. The teachers hope to some day hire the CityLab mobile unit to 
visit Wilmington High School so that all biology students can share the 
experience . 

Aquaculture students, under the instruction of Mr. Scott Ferguson, raised 
between 400-500 large-mouth bass in a four hundred gallon fish farm in 
preparation for a spring release of the fish in a cranberry bog on Cape Cod. 
The Wilmington High School Aquaculture class worked in partnership with Salem 
State College and the Cat Cove Aquaculture Lab. The Lab serves as the 
Northeast Massachusetts Aquaculture Center (NEMAC) , which in turn partners 
with the Southeast Massachusetts Aquaculture Center (SEMAC) where the bass 
study originated. This was the second consecutive year that Wilmington High 
School students worked on the bass project as integral members of a 
commercial aquaculture project. 

In June, the Science Department was awarded a $1,500 grant by the Corning 
Foundation in the form of a laboratory glassware allocation. The grant was 
written and submitted by Curriculum Team Leader James Megyesy in an effort to 
further the support of the science laboratory program at the high school. 
Top undergraduate awards presented at the end of the year honored Arielle 
Cimeno and Louis Insalaco. Arielle was awarded the Rensselaer Medal for 
highest combined science and mathematics achievement for three years - a 
$40,000 scholarship to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Louis won the 
Bausch Sc Lomb Award for highest academic achievement in science - a $24,000 
scholarship to the University of Rochester. 

In July, science teachers Michelle Hooper and John Wood spent a week at the 
University of Massachusetts in Lowell instructing twenty-eight area math and 
science teachers as part of a continuing professional development program 
called Pre-College Engineering for Teachers (PCET) . PCET is part of the 
Tufts Engineering Mentors Institute (TEMI) which explores ways of integrating 
engineering design into science, math, technology and engineering classrooms 
in grades 9-12 . 

Mr. Raymond Albright and Ms. Theresa Burke were hired over the summer to fill 
vacancies in biology and chemistry respectively. 

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

The Social Studies Department is in the first year of a major transition 
necessitated by the state's adoption of the History and Social Science 
Curriculum Framework. When the transition is complete. World History I will 
be taught in grade 8, U.S. History I in grade 9, U.S. History II in grade 10, 
and World History II in grade 11. The World History I course was moved to 
the eighth grade as of the 2004-2005 school year. For this year only. World 
History I is being taught in both eighth and ninth grades. The current 
eighth grade class, the high school class of 2009, will be the first group to 
experience the new course alignment in its entirety. This course realignment 
process will take place during the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 school years. All 
World History and U.S. History courses will be in their new and hopefully 
final positions for the 2006-2007 school year. The members of the Social 
Studies Department believe that this shift in curriculum alignment will 
afford our students the best opportunity to excel in the Social Science MCAS 
when it becomes a graduation requirement. 



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The Social Studies Department 
is engaged in five major 
activities during this school 
year. These include the Phi 
Alpha Theta State History- 
Conference, the National 
History Day competition, the 
Academic Decathlon 
competition, the Mock Trial 
program and the Debate Club. 

The Phi Alpha Theta State 
History Conference is a 
program in which members of 
the honors -level U.S. History 
classes submit original 15 
page research papers on one 
of a variety of topics from a Wilmington Minutemen assemble at Town Cemetery, 

list prepared by the Phi 

Alpha Theta Committee. The conference is held annually at Framingham State 
College. This year Ms. Russell and Mr. Carr will be taking 42 students to 
the conference, at which students will participate in two break-out seminars 
as well as an awards ceremony. Wilmington students will hopefully be 
bringing home a number of well -deserved awards for their research papers. 

National History Day is a program that is broken into several segments. The 
first is the regional competition, which last year was held in Chelmsford and 
this year will be held at Masconomet Regional High School in Topsfield on 
March 5. The theme for the 2005 National History Day Competition is 
Communication in History: The Key to Understanding . Participants in this 
year's prestigious event are from Mrs. Tucker's AP World History Class and 
Mr. Carr's AP U.S. History Class. Students have been hard at work since the 
fall on their projects. Examples of topics students have been researching 
include the following: Flapper Culture and Style, Cartoons, Photographs, and 
Text; Walt Disney's Communication Through Film; The Energetic Education of 
Muppets: Jim Henson; American Presidential Campaigns and Mass Media: How Do 
Americans Make Decisions?; and Blowin' in the Wind: Protest Songs of the 
1960s. Students will enter their work in one of a number of categories, 
including historical paper, performance, documentary or exhibit. Students 
who finish in the top two of their category in the regional competition 
advance to the statewide competition to be held later in the spring. This 
program provides students the opportunity to demonstrate their historical 
research ability in a manner most compatible with their learning styles. 

The Wilmington Academic Decathlon Team, under the direction of Mr. Riley, 
competes with teams of students from high schools across the state in a 
series of ten academic events . Students are given awards based on both 
individual and team achievements. A unique aspect of the program is that 
each nine-member team must consist of three students each with "A", "B" and 
"C" grade point averages. Students may be in any grade and an unlimited 
number of alternates may also compete. The following students won individual 
awards at the most recent competition: Arielle Cimeno, Julia MacDougall, 
Janice Folk, Samuel Oglesby, Sarah Tavarez and Dan Tanzella. This year's 
team, for the first time ever, qualified for the Massachusetts Finals. 

Mock Trial is a statewide competition in which students are competing against 
their peers from other schools in the Massachusetts Bar Institute Annual Mock 
Trial Program. This program is sponsored by the Boston Law Firm of Brown, 
Rudnick, Freed & Gesmer. Wilmington High School Mock Trial participants are 
being coached by Mr. Staffier. The Mock Trial Program typically attracts 
more than 100 high school teams from all regions of the Commonwealth. The 




-93- 



goal of the program is to further an understanding of the law, court 
procedures and our legal system while helping students to sharpen their 
analytical, listening and speaking skills. It also seeks to promote better 
communication and cooperation between the school community and the legal 
profession . 

The Wilmington High School Debate Club, under the direction of Mrs. Tucker 
and Mr. Hackett, is comprised of approximately ten devoted debaters. The 
group meets every two weeks to choose topics, research the topics and then 
debate the topics. Students are randomly assigned to either the pro or con 
side of the debate topic. The goal is for the debate club to evolve into an 
interscholastic debate team. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 

The Foreign Language Department welcomed five new teachers this year, three 
at the Middle School and two at the High School. Mr. Michel Rabanal, a 
native French speaker, is teaching grade 7 and 8 French and also grade 7 
Spanish. Mrs. Cynthia Irish, a graduate of UMASS Amherst and Northeastern 
Law School, is teaching Spanish in grades 7 and 8. Ms. Rosangela Farulla, a 
graduate of Merrimack College, is teaching Spanish in the grade 6 Exploratory 
program and in grade 7. On the High School level, Ms. Terresa Pietro, a 
graduate of Tufts University who taught for a year in Costa Rica, is our new 
Spanish teacher and Mr. Randall Drake, a graduate of the American University 
in Paris, France, is teaching French and first year Spanish. Mr. Drake is 
also teaching French in the grade 6 Exploratory program. The Foreign 
Language Department congratulates former Wilmington High School teacher 
Joanne Baker on her marriage to Bruce Veliz. Mrs. Baker-Veliz is now 
teaching French at Wilmington High School. We also congratulate Dr. Marlene 
Ross, who after forty years of teaching Spanish, French, Italian and Chinese 
at Wilmington High School, will retire in June, 2005. Curriculum Team 
Leader, Mrs. Joyce Beckwith, presented a workshop on foreign language 
advocacy at the annual Conference of the American Council of Foreign Language 
Teachers in Chicago in November. This year's Foreign Language Club at 
Wilmington High School has over 60 members who meet once a month to learn 
about other cultures and sample traditional foods from countries around the 
world . 

WILMINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Wilmington Middle School currently services 957 students in grades 6 
through 8. There are 90 professional staff members, including two guidance 
counselors and a school psychologist. The students, staff and parents are 
committed to enhancing teaching and learning in order to implement the 
school's core values of responsibility, respect and curriculum and 
instruction. Wilmington Middle School is a community of young adolescent and 
adult learners. We believe that all students can learn and that everyone in 
the Wilmington community is a partner in learning. This community includes 
students, parents, teachers and the school staff. 

Responsibility and Respect 

The Wilmington Middle School Community continues to develop and expand 
school-wide programs and activities for students, staff and parents that 
create a positive school environment, promote respect and responsibility, 
foster harmony, tolerate diversity and support community based programs. 

During the 2003-2004 year, the Middle School staff supported a number of 
programs, to enhance the core value of respect among the middle school 
community. "Mix It Up" Day was celebrated during lunchtime. This nationwide 
activity encourages students to reach out and look beyond stereotypes. 
Students in the sixth grade were encouraged to expand their friendships with 
other students. 



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students in grades 6 and 7 participated in an anti -bullying workshop through 
Deana's Fund, a violence prevention organization. Members of these classes 
viewed a play, "Doin' The Right Thing," where actors/educators portray 
verbal, non-verbal and physical behavior that mirrors real life bullying and 
harassment in today's schools. The students observed positive role modeling 
when the main character decides to take a stand and do the right thing. 
After the performance, students participated in interactive discussions which 
encouraged student responsibility for creating a safe school. 

The Peer Mediation Program was brought back to encourage positive role models 
among students as well as a means of mediation for student conflict. The 
program consists of two student advisors and 24 peer mediators. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

In the 2003-2004 academic year, there was a whole school initiative to 
conduct an overall assessment and revision of the Middle School curriculum as 
it relates to the present Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and setting 
high standards for all students. Staff members utilized Curriculum 
Instruction Time to develop a core set of reading materials for yearly 
instruction as well as summer reading. Teachers formed after-school study 
groups to review young adult literature to support this initiative. 

Additional support for MCAS Language Arts was provided in order to design and 
implement a student writing portfolio project. A new MCAS Mathematics 
Preparatory class was formed to support students who needed assistance in 
this area. 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

North Intermediate School houses 330 children in grades four and five. Our 
students enjoy the challenge of a hands-on, developmentally appropriate 
curriculum and an exciting learning environment that develops self-esteem, 
personal and social management skills and critical and creative thinking 
skills. At North Intermediate School, we are fortunate to have a dedicated 
and conscientious teaching staff and very active parent organization who work 
together to meet students' needs and work collaboratively with one another to 
provide activities and events that appeal to all students. A model setting 
for children to share and learn together, North Intermediate School is 
committed to the district's philosophy of inclusion, where special education 
staff, regular education teachers and subject area specialists work together 
to provide a framework of success for all our students. 

This was another successful year for the PAC under the able direction of co- 
chairs Janet Engrem and Sue Connors. The enrichment committee, led by 
Kathleen McFadden and Patty Kasparian, arranged for four PAC-sponsored 
assemblies featuring programs on Science, Poetry, Conflict Resolution and 
Storytelling. Our Dads' Group meets monthly and is now in the process of 
planning several activities including Boys' Night Out, Friday Night at the 
Movies and a trip to see a regional ball game. This year's School Advisory 
Council (SAC) is once again meeting in conjunction with the council from the 
West Intermediate School. Two parents, Joanne Luise and Judy Alatalo, and 
two teachers, Tanya Pomerleau and Kathy Quigley, have volunteered to work on 
this committee, which advises the principal on educational goals and needs, 
the annual school building budget and recommended improvements. For parents 
who prefer a more informal setting, coffee hour with the principal is 
provided four times a year with an open agenda. Parents with a passion for 
reading and/or a passion for entertainment are invited to participate in our 
school-wide reading program "Read Across the North," as well as this Spring's 
teacher-directed Student Talent Show. There are many opportunities for 
parent involvement at the North Intermediate School . 



-95- 



We are fortunate to have an army of parent volunteers. They participate in 
many areas, including the classrooms, library, computer room, field trips, 
Ski Club, Destination Imagination, emergency phone tree, copy room, book 
fairs, fifth grade farewell celebration and field day. 

Our teachers continue to pursue a variety of professional development 
opportunities. In addition to taking graduate level course work and 
attending conferences that focus on strategies and techniques for enhancing 
our curriculum, improving instruction for all students, and increasing 
student achievement, they have actively participated in workshops sponsored 
by the district. To prepare youngsters for the possibilities and 
probabilities of a future we cannot even imagine, our teachers believe their 
charge is to trigger critical and creative patterns for thinking. By causing 
kids to think! question! doubt! wonder! explore! analyze! debate! advocate! 
hypothesize ! idealize ! and create.' they provide fertile ground for our 
students to think about their thinking and learn about their learning. 

Character education is woven into our monthly school spirit assemblies in 
which our school motto, "Courtesy, Cooperation, and Common Sense" is 
emphasized. At these assemblies and during classroom morning meetings, 
teachers incorporate activities and discussions around our motto. North 
Intermediate Happy Grams are awarded to our students on a daily basis, with 
children's names being announced over the intercom. These awards are written 
by the adults in the building and are given to individual children, 
classrooms or grade levels in recognition of something positive. 

We take pride in the accomplishments of our students and staff and convey 
this message by the ways in which we develop school atmosphere, maintain our 
school facility, establish high expectations for student achievement and 
present learning experiences. We are pleased to report that two mini -grant 
applications were accepted for funding through the Wilmington Education 
Foundation, The Reading Incentive Project written by reading teacher Jan 
Merlino and Librarian Heather Peachey, and one submitted by fourth grade 
teacher Tanya Pomerleau, called Writers Read. Every year the Reading 
Municipal Light Department sponsors an art contest based on electrical 
safety, which is a component of our fourth grade science program. Meaghan 
Bransfield and Kyle DuBois received a U.S. Savings Bond for their efforts. 
Other savings bonds were awarded to Tess Gormley and Brooks Carter for their 
essays on "What Veterans' Day Means to Me." Students and staff are also to 
be commended for their active interest in the community at large, as 
evidenced by their participation in Wilmington Food Pantry drives. Coats for 
Kids, New England Pediatric Care Center drive. Used Book Drive, Valentines 
for Veterans' program and Local Heroes program. 




Fifth graders Justine Sicari, 
Miranda Faison, E.J. Boggia and 
Nick Jackson assist Mr. Lou Cimaglia 
firom Local Heroes with a box of 
supplies for our local servicemen 
and women serving in Iraq and 
elsewhere. 



WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The West Intermediate School strives to have children develop a sense of 
belonging to their school. A sense of belonging in elementary school helps 
decrease incidents of risky behavior. The West staff prides itself on 
welcoming children into the school, greeting children by name and making each 
child feel valued as members of the school community. 

The West 

Intermediate School 
provides a small 
school environment, 
personal attention 
to detail, staff 
working together to 
improve the quality 
of instruction and 
the service to 
children. There is 
an art classroom 
specifically 
designed for the 
teaching of art 
education. The 
children have a very 
large music room. 
The room has the 
risers for 

presentations and an 
audio system that 

supports instruction. There is classroom space for specialists, instrumental 
education, conferencing and teacher workrooms and a computer room for large 
group instruction. 

Every classroom in the school is connected directly to the school system's 
Internet provider. Daily communication is carried out via e-mail between the 
staff and the office. Plans are in place for adding additional computers to 
each classroom. The school has an active web page that provides daily and 
weekly information to parents and students. Many of the teachers post daily, 
weekly assignments on School Notes.com to assist students and parents in 
daily preparation of schoolwork. 




Finishing touches to newly landscaped area in front of the West Intermediate School. 



The students at the 
letters in the word 
Respectful, Industr 
these qualities in 
teaching, secretari 
assemblies will be 
of the children for 
encourage students' 



West Intermediate School have PRIDE in their school. The 

PRIDE form an acronym, which stands for Pleasant, 
ious, Dependable and Enthusiastic. Students who exhibit 
school will be awarded WEST PRIDE cards by members of the 
al, administrative, custodial and kitchen staff. Monthly 
held to bring students together to review the good deeds 

each month. Small prizes will be awarded to students to 

participation in the program. 



During the December holiday season children from the West Intermediate School 
contributed to Wilmington Fire Department's Toys For Children In Need . A 
goal of the school is to encourage community service on the part of the 
children. We are encouraging our children to take an active interest in their 
community and to become involved. 

Our goal is to create a learning environment that welcomes children to 
school, provides for their safety and educates them to the best of their 
abilities . 



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The Shawsheen School PAC continues to support grades one to five at both the 
Shawsheen and the West Schools. Enrichment programs, fundraisers and school 
support will continue to be a main function of the PAC. 

During the 2004 school year the West Intermediate School collaborated with 
the Wilmington Garden Club and its president, Mrs. Patricia Kaserpian, 
Wilmington Public Works and the Shawsheen West PAC to construct a garden with 
benches adjacent to the school entrance. 



Red Sox fever 
engulfed the school 
and the community. 
Many days were 
celebrated with the 
wearing of Red Sox 
colors, hats and 
shirts, as the school 
celebrated the Sox's 
world series victory. 

Two of our teachers 
retired this past 
school year, Mrs. 
Mary Maxey and Mrs . 
Marge Penttinen and 
five new teachers 
were added to our 
staff; Ms. Erin 
Healey, Ms. Kristen 
Lucke, Ms. Jennifer 
DeSimone, Ms. Regina 
_ Lamont and Ms . Kendra 

Vonderheide. 

Red Sox Championship display at the West Intermediate School. 

The West Intermediate 
School offers an 

extended day program for students both before school opens in the morning and 
again in the afternoon after school closes . 




SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



The Shawsheen Elementary School is one of two primary schools, serving grades 
one through three. We have seven first-grade classrooms, seven second-grade 
classrooms and eight third-grade classrooms. In addition, the school houses 
two self-contained special education classrooms ;' one for those students with 
academic challenges and the other for students with Pervasive Developmental 
Disorder, Autism or Aspberger's Syndrome. 

The Shawsheen staff members continue to strive to review and revise the 
curriculum in order to remain current with the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks and to provide our students with excellent learning opportunities. 
This past year the staff members have reviewed the math Trailhlazers , during 
the curriculum improvement times and developed pacing calendars to assist 
them in being able instruct all of the assigned units in a consistent and 
timely manner. Our third grade team completed some extensive work on 
designing a study unit on Massachusetts in alignment with the Social Studies 
Frameworks. As a result of their collaborative efforts, the students have 
been able to participate in truly rich learning experiences. 



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Once again literacy remains to be a major priority of our school and of the 
district. We are pleased to have had many staff representatives who served 
on a literacy task force whose charge was to research current reading 
language arts programs. Their hard work resulted in the choosing of two 
programs to be piloted during the 2004-2005 school year. We have a teacher 
at each grade level who volunteered to pilot one of the chosen programs. Two 
teachers are piloting one series. We are working in coordination with 
teachers at the other schools. This exciting venture will end with the task 
force making a final decision by the end of the 2004-2005 school year, 
choosing one of the two piloted programs. The goal is then to have the 
program adopted and ready for all teachers to instruct by August 2005. 

Our unified arts personnel continue to provide a well-rounded curriculum to 
enrich the students learning experience. In addition to the weekly sessions 
provided by art, music, library, physical education and health for all of our 
students, the unified arts staff presented an interdisciplinary concert with 
the third graders about Massachusetts. By working as a team, the teachers 
wrote lyrics to familiar tunes, created dialogues to introduce acts, designed 
costumes and scenery and choreographed movements to create an innovative 
program that reinforced all of the study units focused on our great state and 
learned by the third grade class. It was a concert to be remembered. 

Since this was a presidential election year, the Shawsheen Student Council, 
under the direction of the assistant principal, provided a voting experience 
for our student body. Each class coordinated discussions about elections and 
about the presidential candidates. Ballots were printed containing the 
photograph of each candidate. Students had to register to vote before 
receiving a ballot. They then proceeded to a booth to cast their vote. 
Thanks to the work of the student council, the voting experience was closely 
simulated. The results closely resembled those of the nation. 




Shawsheen Elementary 
School students 
cast their votes 
during the mock 
presidential election. 



These are fine examples of how we work to make student learning relevant and 
meaningful, while enhancing the core curriculum with these enriching 
experiences. We are fortunate to have parent volunteers who give of their 
time and effort in supporting the curriculum as well. Because of the work of 

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parents, we have another reading incentive program in progress called Cruise 
into Reading . Similar to last year, the students are reading nightly, this 
time for a six-month period, to reach a destination that will result in a 
final incentive. As a result of reaching the incredible goal of reading over 
one million minutes during last year's program, all staff and students 
dedicated one day in the spring coming to school dressed in Hawaiian clothing 
donned with colorful leis and flowers. The students even had a chance to see 
their principal dressed in a grass skirt! 

In an effort to communicate to a larger audience all of the exciting learning 
and events that take place at the Shawsheen School, we have five staff 
members who have volunteered to serve as the Shawsheen WCTV crew. In 
addition to videotaping concerts, which are aired on WCTV, they are taping 
lessons in all content areas to become part of a curriculum library. The 
videotapes will be available for both staff and parents to borrow and view to 
see the exciting instruction that takes place daily at our school. Finally, 
to show the extent that the community is involved in our school, the members 
of the crew have been taping parents and public safety personnel as they come 
to our school to present special programs and activities. This 
community/parent involvement tape will be archived and available for viewing 
as well. 



Shawsheen staff members participated in the first Family Math Night. This 
was a wonderful opportunity for the parents to witness firsthand the great 
learning that is happening with our students through the math Trailblazers 
program. During this incredibly well attended event, parents were able to 
see the spiraling concept of the program as one skill area was demonstrated 
from kindergarten through grade five. It was truly fascinating to watch as 
students showed their parents how to complete the tasks set up at each grade 
level table. Parents appeared quite amazed at what their children were able 
to accomplish and enjoyed having an opportunity to see how the program is 
designed . 



Second grade 
students at the 
Shawsheen 
Elementary 
School entertain 
the audience 
with song 
during their 
Winter Concert. 




-100- 



The computer lab at our school was expanded to twenty-two workstations. This 
afforded us the opportunity to have students visit the lab as a class, having 
an available workstation for each one. First and second grade classrooms 
visit the lab twice a week to have students work independently on a reading 
review. Staff members are then able to run a Gains Report on each student to 
assess their growth. This data is used to individualize instruction. Our 
third grade students participated in a daily keyboarding lesson for a two- 
week period to strengthen their typing skills. Their typing skills are 
further enhanced in the classroom through weekly practice using Alpha boards. 
The third grade classrooms have been scheduled for weekly lab time that 
afford them opportunities to access the internet in order to conduct research 
on assigned projects. All of this speaks to our school and district's 
ongoing commitment in the area of technology. 

Once again, our Parent Advisory Council (PAC) remains a vital part of our 
school community. For the first time this year, the PAC Fundraising 
Committee held an auction in the fall that not only raised an incredible 
amount of money to support our school and its programs, but also provided a 
night out filled with much fun and laughter. One way the monies are used is 
to provide enrichment programs that are scheduled throughout the school year. 
These programs not only prove to be entertaining, but also support and 
enhance our curriculum. The hard work and commitment, demonstrated by our 
PAC members, are greatly appreciated by the staff and students. 

The safety and security of all members of Shawsheen School community 
continues to be a top priority. To this end, we continually review and 
uphold our visitor policy and remain diligent in that all visitors check in 
at the main office with our school secretary and that all doors, except the 
front entrance are locked while the school is in session. We practice fire 
drills monthly and we conduct lockdown drills on a regular basis. Other 
procedures are in place for arrival and departure times, including a written 
policy for car riders. We are seriously committed to making the students and 
staff feel safe and secure throughout the school day. 

The Shawsheen staff members remain dedicated to designing daily instruction, 
which addresses and meets the diverse needs of our student population. Our 
goal is to help each one of them make effective progress and to realize their 
learning potentials. It is also our goal to assist each student with 
developing skills and traits that will serve them in becoming productive and 
responsible citizens in adulthood. To this end, the staff works with them in 
developing good character and qualities. We currently have over eighty-five 
percent of our staff members who have been trained with the philosophy 
promoted by Responsive Classroom. During morning meetings students have 
opportunities to develop community in their respective classrooms and talk 
about the qualities that help them to interact with one another in a 
respectful and positive manner. 

We are happy to say that student growth and development, academically and 
socially, continue to be the main focus of the Shawsheen School. By working 
as a team and by establishing strong partnerships with parents and community 
members, we have created a highly spirited environment where students come 
ready and willing to learn each and every day. 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

The Woburn Street School is one of two elementary schools in Wilmington 
designated for children in grades one, two and three. This year the 
classroom composition of the school was changed to include one additional 
second grade classroom and one less third grade classroom. These changes 
were made to accommodate shifts in student population at these levels. There 
are currently eight first grade classrooms, eight second grade classrooms, 

-101- 



seven third grade classrooms and one self-contained special needs class. 
Changes in staffing have also occurred at the Woburn Street School. Mrs. 
Erin Donahue (Miss McCarthy) was hired as the new third grade teacher and 
Miss Jody Lament was hired to teach second grade. The first grade staff 
remains unchanged. Among our specialists, several staffing changes have 
occurred. Miss Christine Bucuvalas transferred from the Wilmington Middle 
School to become the' new Reading Specialist. Mrs. Mary Ellen Danahy is the 
new school Librarian. There are two new staff members in our self-contained 
special needs classroom. Mrs. Shanna Crowell is the new teacher in the 
class. She has two educational assistants, one of which. Miss Susan 
Mattertall, is new to our staff. The final new staff member at the Woburn 
Street School this year is Mr. Steven Maxson. 

Our technology program has been expanded as a result of the addition of eight 
new computer stations and the redesigning of our computer lab to accommodate 
a whole class at once. In the past, only half a class was able to 
participate in our computer programs at one time. Third grade students have 
been introduced to a new keyboarding program, Bernie' s Typing Travels, 
designed to begin to teach children keyboarding techniques and to develop 
typing skills that will assist them with the use of the computer. In 
addition, students continue to work in the Success Maker Program and use the 
Alpha Smart keyboards and teachers continue to use the Smart Board that is 
available at the school. We are constantly seeking to upgrade and improve 
our technological services and advances. 

The continued improvement of our curriculum, its alignment to the Curriculum 
Frameworks and the analysis of data to identify specific areas in need of 
improvement is an on-going goal at the Woburn Street School . We are in the 
fourth year of the Trail Blazers math program and in the fifth year of the 
Cast-A-Spell program. The Rinehart Handwriting Program is taught in all 
classrooms and we continue to emphasize writing and the development of an 
appropriate composition at each grade level. Writing prompts are 
administered to all students twice a year in order to collect writing 
samples, assess skills, monitor progress and adjust instruction practices. 
Three of our current staff members - Mrs. Hackett, Mrs. Linscott and Miss 
Bradley - attended a weeklong training session with the Massachusetts 
Department of Education this past summer for the scoring of writing samples 
using the state rubric. They have worked with other teachers at the school 
and in the district to help improve our collective ability to accurately 
assess writing using the state standard. There is exciting work in English/ 
Language Arts this year with the piloting of two new integrated language arts 
programs. This is the result of a district -wide Literacy Task Force 
comprised of representatives from every elementary school in Wilmington which 
reviewed five language arts programs last spring, evaluated them and 
determined the two that were most appropriate to meet our elementary language 
arts curriculum needs. The two programs we are piloting are published by 
Scott Foresman and Houghton Mifflin. Three classroom teachers and several 
support staff members are involved in the process of teaching and evaluating 
these programs at the Woburn Street School this year. 

Our Reading Incentive Program continues again this year with the theme. 
Championship Reading , and the children are busily reading at home each day to 
complete the program's requirements. In March we will be hosting our annual 
visiting author as part of this program. This year our author will be Robert 
San Souci, who has written over 85 books for children representing folk tales 
from every part of the world. Those children who complete the Reading 
Incentive Program will receive an autographed book by Robert San Souci. 

Once again in May the Woburn Street School hosted an exciting poetry program, 
planned and directed by Ms. Traci Benvenga and Ms. Maura Bradley, two of our 
third grade teachers. Ms. Bradley attended the Summer Poetry Institute at 



-102- 



Boston University during the summer of 2002, under the direction of former 
Poet Laureate of the United States, Robert Pinsky, and was based on his 
Favorite Poem Project. As a result, Ms. Bradley and Ms. Benvenga work to 
bring the Favorite Poem Project to the Woburn Street School each year. They 
also worked with Mr. LaPointe to provide a series of six poetry workshops for 
teachers throughout the district based on the Boston University model. This 
is exciting work and has been well received at the Woburn Street School. 

Our focus on the improvement of safety and security at the Woburn Street 
School continues to be a high priority. The safety committee continues to 
meet regularly. All volunteers at the school are required to complete CORI 
forms and all staff members wear I.D. badges to identify themselves. 
Visitors and volunteers are also required to wear badges whenever they are in 
the building for any reason. A "grab and go" box containing emergency 
information for all students and staff members, as well as a floor plan for 
the school and other information considered important, is ready for any 
possible emergency. Various fire and emergency drills have been conducted 
and staff members discuss procedures for possible situations that would 
require a predetermined plan. It is the goal of the Woburn Street School and 
the Wilmington Public Schools to anticipate any possible emergency situation 
and to develop a plan to ensure the safety of all students and school 
personnel. This is an ongoing goal. 

The Woburn Street School continues to strive to create a positive climate for 
parents, students and staff members. A website has been developed to 
disseminate information about the school and its programs, and a parent 
information center has been established in the foyer of the school. The 
Responsive Classroom Program has been implemented to help establish positive 
student behavior. Many staff members at all levels attended training for the 
Responsive Classroom Program during the past summer. Positive playground 
behavior is also being reinforced and playground bags have been created for 
each classroom to provide students with appropriate equipment to use during 
recess periods. The Woburn Street School consciously works to create a 
welcoming, positive and safe environment at the school. 

This year we are especially privileged to have the 2005 Iditarod Teacher on 
the Trail, Mrs. Lynne Gordon, as part of our teaching staff. Mrs. Gordon is 
a second grade teacher at the Woburn Street School and has been using the 
Iditarod as part of her classroom curriculum for several years. She was 
selected as the Teacher on the Trail from candidates across the United States 
and is the first teacher from Massachusetts to receive this distinction. 
Last March, after becoming one of the three finalists for this position, Mrs. 
Gordon traveled to Alaska for one week, interviewed with the selection 
committee and made her final presentation. She was notified in May that she 
had been selected as the 2005 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail. Since then, 
Mrs. Gordon has been extremely busy preparing lessons, writing articles and 
otherwise making preparations to be in Alaska during the time of the 
Iditarod. She has been featured in newspaper articles and other publications 
and has spoken to various groups about her work as Teacher on the Trail. As 
part of her work with the Iditarod, Mrs. Gordon has established a literacy 
project called. The Alaska Book Project. It is her goal to present each of 
the twenty-two schools along the Iditarod trail with a collection of 
nonfiction books related to the culture and history of Massachusetts. This 
excellent project is being supported by several professional and civic 
organizations, including the Massachusetts Reading Association, the 
International Reading Association and many of the local reading councils in 
the Commonwealth. She is also being supported by local groups such as the 
Kivanis and the Woburn Street Parent Advisory Council. We at the Woburn 
Street School are very proud of Mrs. Gordon for being chosen the 2005 
Iditarod Teacher on the Trail. 



-103- 



The Woburn Street School is continually grateful for the generous support of 
the PAC . Their fundraising activities generate considerable monies for 
programs and materials that benefit the school and enhance the curriculum. 
Throughout the year they provide enrichment programs and purchase a variety 
of materials for the school. The Woburn Street School is grateful for their 
tireless work and their unending support. It is together with parents and 
tfeachers that we are able to create an atmosphere that encourages learning, 
strives to meet the needs of each child and fosters the well-being and 
success of all students. 

BOUTWELL EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is a comprehensive student centered 
facility. It is home to an integrated pre-school class, a self-contained 
special education pre-school class, four kindergarten classrooms and an 
extended day kindergarten classroom (C . A. R . E . S . ) . The Boutwell Early 
Childhood Center continues to provide classroom space for the S.E.E.M. 
Collaborative. These two classrooms are utilized by the deaf and hard of 
hearing children at the pre-school and kindergarten level. The Global Child 
Program, a supplementary, fee-based foreign language program, is offered to 
the students during the school year. 

Our kindergarten and integrated pre-school classrooms are presently half-day 
programs. The kindergarten students receive Art, Gym, Music and Physical 
Education. Our Library Program is conducted by volunteers. The children are 
introduced to a variety of authors and exchange books. Special Education 
services are available to those students who qualify for assistance. These 
support services include, Speech and Language Therapy, Occupational Therapy, 
Physical Therapy and Resource/Learning services. Our school is also staffed 
with a full-time nurse. 

The pre-school and kindergarten curriculums are aligned to the Massachusetts 
Curriculum Frameworks. Literacy is an integral part of the children's school 
day. With the adoption of a formal literacy program and the continued 
influence of the Lively Letters Program, the children are provided with a 
comprehensive phonemic awareness, reading and written language program. 
Literacy Night was presented in October. This two-part series was hosted by 
the Kindergarten staff in conjunction with the Speech and Language 
Pathologists at the Boutwell and Wildwood Early Childhood Centers. Parents 
received an overview of the many components of literacy, as well as ideas and 
suggestions that will enrich and strengthen the home/school connection. Our 
Math Program, Trailblazer, lays the foundation for number sense and 
operations, through hands-on, interactive curriculum lessons. 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center's Parent Advisory Council/PAC, is a 
dedicated group of parents, whose goal is to provide support and enrichment 
to our students. By working closely with staff, and through their tireless 
fundraising efforts, the PAC has provided the students with programs that 
enrich and enhance the curriculum. PAC also sponsors several family events, 
such as Family Fun Night and the Ice Cream Social, which bring our families 
together for enjoyable activities. 

Our School Advisory Council is the combined effort of the Boutwell and 
Wildwood Early Childhood Centers. It consists of a committee of 
administrators, teachers and parents, who meet on a monthly basis. The focus 
of SAC is to develop a School Improvement Plan that encompasses safety, 
security, building and curriculum issues. 



-104- 



A number of performances are held 
during the school year under the 
direction of our music teacher 
and the kindergarten and pre- 
school staff. A holiday program 
in December and a Spring Concert 
in March are presented to family 
and friends. The children were 
involved in a month long study of 
their community and treated 
family and friends to a 
performance celebrating 
Wilmington. It was the 
culmination of much hard work and 
a great learning experience. The 
school year ends with the annual 
Field Day, under the direction of 
our Physical Education Teacher. 
Parent volunteers, staff and 
students participate in a variety 
of activities, such as relay 
races, face painting, balloon 
toss to name a few. It is a 
great day and a wonderful way to 
end the school year. 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center continues to create a positive learning 
environment for its students. Our staff works tirelessly on curriculum and 
instruction, ever cognizant of each child's social and emotional development. 
Together with the support and involvement of our parents, we strive to make 
each child's first public school experience, a positive, productive and 
enriching one. 

WILDWOOD EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 

The Wildwood Early Childhood Center houses four kindergarten classrooms, a 
kindergarten Special Education Bridge Program, an Extended Day Kindergarten 
Program (C . A. R . E . S . ) , an integrated pre-school program and a pre-school 
special education classroom. Additionally, we provide a before and after- 
school care program for our families. The Global Child Program, a 
supplementary fee-based foreign language program, is also offered to 
kindergarten children during the school year. 

The kindergarten and integrated pre-school programs are presently half-day 
programs. The Bridge Program and the Special Needs Pre-school Program 
operate on full-day schedules. The kindergarten children also enjoy weekly 
art, music and library classes. Physical Education classes are held in our 
cafeteria/gymnasium. Lunches are served to our full day children on a daily 
basis. Special education support services, such as Speech/Language Therapy, 
Resource/Learning Support, Occupational and Physical Therapy are available 
for students needing such assistance. 

Literacy is one of the most important facets of our curriculum at the 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center prides 
itself on being a student-centered educational facility, emphasizing 
individual student achievement, strong student-centered curriculum, family 
involvement and positive school climate. Staff continues to work tirelessly 
keeping our curriculum current and in accordance with the state Frameworks, 
in an effort to provide our students with literacy and social skills that 
will last them a lifetime. Classroom and center activities focus on age- 
appropriate literacy skills, phonemic awareness, math, written language. 




Ice Sculpture at the Town Common funded by the Wilmington 
Chamber of Commerce. 



-105- 



science, social studies and social skills development. A new 
English/Language Arts Program will be adopted for the 2005-2006 school year, 
along with a new Progress Report Card for the kindergarten program. 

Social and emotional development is an equally important facet of our 
curriculum in the pre-school and kindergarten programs. Play and positive 
peer interactions are woven into every child's day. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is a combined committee of administrators, 
teachers and parents from the Boutwell and Wildwood Schools, who meet on a 
monthly basis, to develop a school improvement plan for the early childhood 
centers. The school improvement plan is a compilation of goals addressing 
school environment, learning, school safety, communication, transition 
issues, technology, core values and parent/community involvement. 

Additionally, our parents put forth great interest and enthusiasm in all of 
their efforts in support of our school through the Parent Advisory Council 
(PAC) . PAC sponsored Scholastic Book Fairs, Movie Nights and a Family Fun 
Night are but a few of the events offered by our PAC. Our PAC has also 
sponsored a highly successful school-wide field trip for the past two years, 
funded through very successful fund raising efforts during the school year. 
The parent organization also sponsors our annual coat and food drives that 
support Wilmington community programs. 

Other special programs take place throughout the year involving town 
officials that come to our school and establish important relationships with 
our young students. Officer Moon, our Safety Officer, is a friendly face to 
all the children as he presents bus and community safety programs in the 
fall. Lt . Hurley and other fire fighters bring important fire safety 
messages and programs. We are thankful to have such community involvement 
and support for the children at the Wildwood Early Childhood Center. 

In December, the entire school participates in our "Winter Celebration" 
Concert. Pre-school and kindergarten classes join together to entertain 
parents, grandparents and friends with songs about various winter holiday 
traditions. We all learned about Christmas, Chanukah and Kwanzaa. We hope 
everyone saw our show on local cable TV, WCTV. 

In the spring, our kindergarten staff and students participate in our 
"Celebrate Wilmington" Unit. Specifically designed lessons and activities, 
developed by our teachers, are implemented in each classroom. The 
kindergarten children learn important information and facts about their town. 
The culminating activity is a concert for family and friends. Many familiar 
songs have been adapted to focus on our town, its citizens and local 
historical sites. 

PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT 

With the advent of the Education Reform Act, more than a decade ago, the Arts 
were designated as a core subject in all public schools along with 
English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, History/Social Science, Foreign 
Languages and Technology/Engineering. The Arts were defined as including: 
music, theatre, visual arts and dance. Education Reform Act legislation 
required a curriculum framework to be developed for each core subject. The 
music curriculum framework states that students will learn about and use the 
symbolic language of music, as well as the history and criticism of music, 
and the role of music in community and as linked to other disciplines. 
Included in this curriculum framework for music are ten strands (or main 
instructional areas), which include: Reading and Notating music, Critical 
response to music, Singing, Improvisation and Composition, Playing 
Instruments. The Wilmington Performing Arts Department has reviewed and 



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reconstructed our music and theatre arts curriculums twice during the past 
decade, with the latest revisions being made last year to comply with the 
requirements of the Education Reform Act. These changes, along with strong 
community support, have enabled our performing arts teachers to offer a 
comprehensive music curriculum in grades K-12, as well as the recent 
introduction of a curricular theatre arts program at Wilmington High School. 

Elementary Schools 

At the elementary school level (grades K-5) , all students receive a general 
music class each week. In these classes, students learn the basics of 
reading and writing music, as well as singing and playing instruments. 
Students in third grade receive their first instrumental music experience 
with the opportunity to play the recorder. Recorder instruction continues 
through the 4'^'^ and 5'^*' grades for all Wilmington students. Additionally, 
students in the 4"^*^ and 5*^^ grade have the opportunity to expand their music 
education by taking lessons on a band or string instrument. In concert with 
learning the mechanics of music, our students are also given the opportunity 
to experience, firsthand, the creation and presentation of music in public 
performance. Every elementary student participates in a choral production at 
least once during the course of each school year. The Boutwell and Wildwood 
schools presented wonderful winter concerts in December, as did the 4*^^ grade 
chorus at the West Intermediate School and the 5*^^ grade chorus at the North 
Intermediate School. Elementary instrumental music students participated at 
the 4'^^ and 5*^^ grade winter chorus concerts and the 5*^^ grade advanced band 
performed with the WHS Chorus as part of the Winter Concert series presented 
at Wilmington High School. At the Woburn Street and Shawsheen schools, 
students will be working, by grade level, on cross curriculum programs for 
the spring. These students will perform in a thematic program, which can 
include aspects of visual arts, physical education, research skills, American 
history and/or science. 

Middle School 

Students in grades 6 - 8 at Wilmington Middle School continue their music 
education with practical application of the skills and knowledge acquired at 
the elementary school level. Students elect to study guitar or keyboard for 
a term of 25 days in beautifully appointed music labs. During the term, 
students learn the basics of playing instruments, as well as using them for 
composition and improvisation. For example, one of the culminating 
activities for the keyboard class is a performance, by students, of a musical 
for which they compose and perform the music. Middle School students also 
have the opportunity to join a performing ensemble that meets during the 
regular school day as part of the standard curriculum. Currently, the Middle 
School offers a 6''^ grade chorus, 7''^ & 8"*' grade chorus, 6"^ - 8"*' grade Band, 
and 6^^ - 8^^ grade Strings. Additionally, a select Jr. Jazz Band rehearses 
after school once a week. Each of these performing ensembles presents a 
minimum of two public concerts each year. A highlight of this year's 6'^^ 
grade chorus was a special jazz master class. WHS alumni and professional 
singer Taunia Soderquist taught the 6^^ grade chorus members how to scat and 
improvise and led them in a rousing a cappella song at the conclusion of the 
session. Every music ensemble at Wilmington Middle School performed as part 
of the Annual Winter Concert series in December and is already busy preparing 
for their performances at the respective String, Band and Choral Festivals at 
WHS in the spring. 



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High School 

At the high school level, students elect to continue their music education by- 
participating in one or more of the following music ensembles: Concert and 
Marching Band, Honors Jazz Band, Strings, Chorus or SoundScape, a select a 
cappella vocal ensemble. In addition to the many performing opportunities, 
these ensembles present students with an opportunity for a more comprehensive 
view of music history and style and a deeper appreciation of music as a 
global language. This fall, several Strings students attended a workshop at 
Berklee College of Music while others also performed at the Cardinal Medeiros 
Homeless Shelter in Boston. Spring of 2005 will find a group of Strings 
students and their parents touring and performing in Ireland. 
This fall, SoundScape began its second year with the audition of new and 
returning members. This year's inaugural performance was at the Danvers High 
School "a cappella invitational." The WHS Choir continued a decade long 
tradition of performing for the always appreciative Rotary Club at their 
December meeting. The Wildcat Marching Band supported our Cape Ann League 
Champion football team and cheerleaders throughout the fall, performing at 
the games. Additionally, they performed proudly at the Veterans' Day 
ceremony on the common in November and represented Wilmington at the East 
Boston Columbus Day, Woburn Halloween, Andover and North End (Boston) 
Christmas parades. 

Band members were able to withstand the elements in style this year, thanks 
to the generous donation by Wilmington Sons of Italy of 13 insulated 
raincoats. All of the high school ensembles participated in the Annual 
Winter Concert Series in December. 

Theatre Arts 

The theatre arts classes at WHS continue to evolve and expose the students to 
rich traditions of theatre. Students in these classes learn about all facets 
of theatre, including the Greek tragedies, theatre games, directing, set 
design, modern musical theatre history, monologues and one act plays. The 
drama club, where students from the theatre classes can apply their classroom 
learning, presented an outstanding rendition of "You're A Good Man Charlie 
Brown" last spring. This fall, music, dance and acting auditions were held 
for this year's drama club production of "Guys and Dolls" to be presented in 
March . 

Our Place in the Community 

For more than a decade the WHS Band has held a food drive at both Market 
Basket and Lucci's Market to benefit the Wilmington Food Pantry on the 
Saturday before Thanksgiving. This year, through the generosity of our 
community and dedication of our students, the band was able to present the 
Food Pantry with a record setting 308 bags of groceries. Last spring, the 
Performing Arts Department staff decided to try to continue the support of 
the Food Pantry all year long. To this end, ticket prices to all evening 
music concerts and performances were raised by $1.00, with that dollar being 
directly contributed to the Wilmington Food Pantry. After last spring's 
donation by the Performing Arts department, the Food Pantry was able to 
purchase a new freezer and stock necessary food items all throughout the 
summer and early fall. 

The Town of Wilmington has a history of embracing and supporting the arts and 
arts education at all levels. Evidence of this can be seen not only in our 
students' wonderful performances, but also the designation of general and 
instrumental music classrooms at each school, and the high quality of our 
technology and equipment for the students to use. Our goal in the Wilmington 
Performing Arts Department is to provide all of our students with the skills 
and knowledge necessary for them to be able to enjoy, participate in and 
support music and the arts throughout their entire lives. 



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FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 



This year the art program in Wilmington has continued to offer art from the 
kindergarten level through Grade 12. We offer a sequential program based on 
the Massachusetts Frameworks. Our teachers include art history covering both 
Western and non-western cultures and exposes our students to a variety of two 
and three dimensional materials. It is important for the staff to have the 
necessary knowledge and skills to help our students progress in what they 
know and can be able to do as they progress through the Wilmington Schools. 

There were some changes in the High School program of studies. Instead of 
Portfolio and Drawing/Painting for advanced art students the class has been 
changed to Advanced Art I and Advanced Art II. This will allow for a broader 
spectrum of students to continue with their art education and also allow for 
a variety of two and three dimensional work in the second semester. The 
Three Dimensional class has been changed to Mixed Media I and II. Again, 
this allows for more interdisciplinary and multicultural content as well as 
an expansion of materials. These classes have been well received. 

Melissa Estremera won a Silver Key for her book illustrated with hand-made 
paper scenes and Katelyn Lynch was awarded an honorable mention for her 
composition based on figure drawings. Miss Fidler's Graphic Design classes 
entered the Library's contest on the importance of voting. The following are 
the list of winners: 

Jimmy Fitzpatrick (Class of 2005) : First place for his button design 

Devin Giroux (Class of 2006) : First place for her button design 

James McGowan (Class of 2006) : First place for his bumper sticker design 

Krystie Chapman (Class of 2005) : First place for her bumper sticker design 

Michael Hudson (Class of 2006) : First place for his poster design 

Sandy Kelly (Class of 2005) : First place for her poster design 

Other students who participated: Danielle Brown (Class of 2005), Holly Brown 
(Class of 2005) , Sean Burns (Class of 2005) , Krystie Chambers (Class of 

2005) , Tim Collins (Class of 2006) , Amanda Dacko (Class of 2005) , Celine 
DeMaggio (Class of 2005) , Mike Doucette (Class of 2006) , Brian Frongillo 
(Class of 2005) , Jen Loranger (Class of 2005) and Krystie Quintal (Class of 

2006) . 

This year students attended the Gauguin exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts. 
Students studied the life and work of Gauguin. We then made rainsticks and 
painted them with Gauguin like landscapes. This fall the advanced students 
visited the Museum of Contemporary Art in Western Massachusetts. Students 
were given a guided tour through the Mathew Richie installation as well as 
the other exhibits. For many students this was their introduction to 
conceptual art. Mrs. Durso's Photography III/IV class visited the Wilmington 
Fire Station on Church Street. They took pictures of not only the fire 
fighters, but the building, trucks and equipment as well. They then returned 
with their work to show them to the fire fighters who appreciated their 
sensitive interpretations of their work and environment. 

ATHLETICS AND HEALTH DYNAMICS 

The Physical Education & Health Department continued to serve all students 
(K-12) . 

The Elementary Physical Education and Health Education Program is a 
comprehensive curriculum which incorporates physical fitness and skill 
development components as well as specific health related topics. The Health 
Education program emphasizes the importance of exercise, body systems, 
hygiene, proper nutrition, personal health care, sun protection, rest/sleep 



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to feel well. The students learn to identify major behaviors that contribute 
to wellness through self-esteem, relationships, responsibility, communication 
and decision making skills. Through the Art, Library, Music and Physical 
Education teachers at the Shawsheen and Woburn Street each school presented 
their interdisciplinary program with their students. At the Shawsheen 
School, the third grade students presented their program called 
"Massachusetts" . In preparing for the program, the students did research in 
Library, made costumes and props in Art, learned song lyrics in Music and 
created dance movement in Physical Education. Each of the seven third grade 
classes had a different topic to cover including: Pilgrims, Native Americans, 
Boston Tea Party, American Revolution, Famous Massachusetts People Past & 
Present, How a Bill Becomes a Law and Massachusetts Geography. At the Woburn 
Street School, the second grade students presented "Interplanetary Jammin'". 
Each of the second grade classes learned about the solar system and the nine 
planets in Library, created dances in Physical Education, learned song lyrics 
in Music and designed scenery and props in Art for the program. These 
interdisciplinary programs have provided the students with an opportunity to 
learn about future MCAS topics in a fun, creative and unique way. At the 
West and North Intermediate, the fourth grade students participated in the 
American Red Cross Choking Charlie training during their health education 
class. The fourth grade students were trained in conscious choke saving 
maneuvers. In fifth grade, we continue to offer the DARE Program in 
cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and Officer Julie Brisbois. 

The Middle School Physical Education and Health Education program is a 
comprehensive curriculum which incorporates physical fitness and sport skill 
development for all students. The physical education department is extremely 
excited about the snow shoeing unit available to students during the winter. 

The Physical Education Curriculum at the High School, Health Dynamics, is a 
comprehensive program dealing with health, fitness and life skills. Students 
will examine appropriate health topics including substance abuse, nutrition, 
physical fitness, human sexuality, mental health and stress management. The 
curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, consumer issues, 
ecology and social issues in the program. Related physical activities 
designed to reinforce health issues will be offered to ensure a complete 
holistic sense of mental, spiritual and physical well-being. 

The Health Dynamics Department cited several students for Outstanding 
Achievement in 2004. 

Academic Excellence Awards were presented to the following students: 

• Class of 2007: Michael Golden 

Kimberly Silvia 

• Class of 2006: Alex Chalmers 

Alyssa Bibeau 

• Class of 2005: Kevin Velardo 

Lani Cabral-Pini 

Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 

Louis Insalaco Brianne Bozzella 

Michael St. Aubin Carleen Ellis 

Phillip Russo Taryn Martiniello 

Brian Caira Eric Brogan 

Sean Murphy Danielle Bamberg 



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Outstanding Effort Awards were presented to the following athletes: 



Daniel Jamerson 
William Nieman 
Scott Konieczka 
Joseph DiMare 
Michael Thomas 

Athletic Award Recipie 



Arielle Cimeno 
Alana Lacey 
Celine DeMaggio 
Alicia Braid 
Courtney Parsons 



• Dr. Gerald Fagan Award: "To the most outstanding Wilmington High 
School Senior Athlete": Kenneth Luongo and Rachele See. 

• Lawrence H. Cushing, Sr. Award: "To the senior demonstrating dedication 
to Athletics at Wilmington High School" : Michael Kelley and Katie 
Riley. 

• Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award: "To the senior athlete demonstrating 
courage, discipline and tenacity while attending Wilmington High 
School" : Derek Trueira and Shannon Fahey. 

• Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Memorial: "To the senior athlete demonstrating 
courage, discipline and tenacity while attending Wilmington High 
School": Derek Trueira and Jackie Robarge . 



Highlights 



• The 2003-2004 Boys Basketball team coached by Jim McCune won the Cape 
Ann League Large School Conference for the third consecutive year. 

• The Girls Ice Hockey team finished first in the North Cape League. 
They were led by Coach of the Year, Joe McMahon as well as player of 
the year, Rachele See. 

• Wildcat Wrestling Team enjoyed its best season ever and was led by Cape 
Ann League Champions Michael St. Aubin at 135 lbs. and Ken Luongo at 
215 lbs. 

• The Wildcat Softball team led by All Scholastic Jackie Joyce captured 
their fourth consecutive Cape Ann League title. 

• The Wilmington High School Golf team coached by "CAL Coach of the 
Year", Al Fessenden captured yet another Cape Ann League title. Kevin 
Velardo the Cape Ann League Player of the Year, was named to both the 
Boston Globe and Boston Herald All Scholastic Teams. 

• The Wildcat Girls Soccer Team coached by Sue Hendee won its 2"^^ Cape Ann 
League Championship. 

• Coach of the Year, Nancy Sullivan, helped guide the Wildcat Football 
Cheerleaders to a Cape Ann League and Regional Championship. 

• Wilmington Football enjoyed one of its most successful seasons ever. 
They were Cape Ann League Champions and undefeated in league play at 
11-0. They defeated Tewskbury 19-9 on Thanksgiving, a day the Town of 
Wilmington honored Fred Bellissimo for his service and commitment to 
the Wilmington Public School System. Joe Herra, Player of the Year in 
the Cape Ann League, was named Boston Globe and Boston Herald All 
Scholastic. Bob Almeida was named Coach of the Year in Cape Ann League 
and the Boston Globe Division II Coach of the Year. In November, the 
New England Patriots voted Coach Almeida "Coach of the Week" . He will 
be coaching in the Annual Shriners Football Game this summer. 



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SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



Wilmington School Food Service employs sixteen full-time and twenty-two part- 
time staff members, in addition to the Food Service Secretary and the 
Administrator of Food Services. All salaries, food, supplies and equipment 
purchases, as well as most maintenance and office supplies are paid from the 
Food Service revolving account. Revenues obtained from student lunch 
participation, reimbursement from the Department of Education, catering. 
Senior Citizen Lunch, Extended Day Care and other programs are used solely 
for the support and improvement of the School Food Service Program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture's food based menu 
planning system and nutrient standards, providing meals that meet 1/3 of the 
RDA for calories, as well as required levels of other key nutrients, 
including fat, saturated fat, protein, vitamins A & C, iron and calcium. In 
May 2004, the Food Service Administrator participated in a nutrient analysis 
training funded by a grant through the Massachusetts School Food Service 
Association. After a comprehensive cost analysis, lunch prices for the 2004- 
2005 school year are as follows: $1.50 at the Elementary and Middle Schools 
and $1.75 at the High School. A total of 414,307 student meals were served 
last school year (2003-2004) . Students may choose from a variety of lunch 
options at all grade levels to encourage participation. District -wide 
participation was approximately 65-70% each month. In addition to full 
meals, a la carte items are available to students to supplement school 
lunches and those brought from home. In a continuing effort to improve the 
nutritional quality of all foods offered at the schools, Wilmington School 
Food Service Department applied for and was chosen to participate in a pilot 
vending program through Stonyfield Farms of New Hampshire. Currently, this 
program is successfully running at the High School. 

Allergy concerns are being addressed. Staff is trained annually in EPI-PEN 
administration. A notebook of food labels has been provided to each school 
nurse and School Food Service Manager for reference. At present, there are 
thirty-seven National Restaurant Association certified sanitarians on staff. 
We continue to train our staff in sanitation, safety. First Aid, CPR and the 
Heimlich Maneuver. 

The School Food Service Administrator participated in the High School Medical 
Careers Night in November. Information was made available to students and 
parents regarding careers in nutrition, dietetics and the food industry. 

Computerized Point-of -Sale systems have been installed at the High and Middle 
schools to improve the efficiency and accuracy of reporting and accounting. 
Kitchen staff received on-site training prior to implementation. 
Participation, especially of students eligible for free and reduced price 
meals, has increased remarkably since this program was introduced. Other 
program improvements completed include the renovation and replacement of 
walk- in freezers and coolers at the West and North Intermediate Schools. 

From July 2003 through June 2004, the senior citizen meals-on-wheels and 
congregate meals program at the West Intermediate School served 14,439 
lunches. Nutrition Fact Sheets are included on each monthly menu to promote 
the School Food Service Department as a partner in community wellness. 



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CONCLUSION 



The following people retired from the Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Frances Boudreau, Robert Cripps, Karen Grossman, Karen Hebert, Matthew 
Joyce, Roger Maderia, Mary Maxey, Marjorie Penttinen, Mary Richard, Mary-Lou 
Sousa and Edward Woods. The Wilmington school community wishes to thank 
these people for their many years of dedicated service to the children of 
Wilmington and wishes them many happy and healthful retirement years. 

We would like to take this opportunity to extend our appreciation to the 
administrators, teachers, support staff, parents and students who contributed 
their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the past school year. 
A special note of thanks to the many town departments that cooperated with 
the school system in 2004. 

Shawsheeo Valley Regional Vocational 

Techoical School District 

The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District is pleased 
to submit its 2004 Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, 
Burlington, Tewksbury, and Wilmington. Located on Cook Street in Billerica 
next to the towns of Burlington and Wilmington, the school celebrated its 
35th anniversary this year, perpetuating the highest quality in vocational 
technical education to area youth and residents. 

The elected representatives of the 10 -member Regional School Committee that 
governs the District are: Mark Trifiro and Donald Drouin from Bedford; 
Kenneth L. Buffum, Chairman, and Bernard F. Hoar, Secretary, from Billerica; 
Paul V. Gedick and Alfred Verrier from Burlington; J. Peter Downing and 
Patricia W. Meuse, Treasurer, from Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis, Vice 
Chairman, and Robert G. Peterson, from Wilmington. Charles Lyons has been 
Superintendent/Director of the District since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School (SVTHS) is one of 26 regional 
vocational technical school districts in Massachusetts. One thousand two 
hundred and twenty-eight (1,228) high-school students were enrolled in 
SVTHS' s day school programs in October of 2004 and more than 600 adults 
participated in the school's various adult and continuing education courses. 

The high school graduating class of 2004 numbered 281 seniors. By September 
of 2004, 92 percent of Shawsheen Tech graduates were either employed in their 
area of expertise or pursuing higher education. One percent entered the 
military forces and seven percent were employed in other trade areas. 

Academic Programs 

MCAS Performance: The high quality of Shawsheen Valley Technical High 
School's academic programs continues to be validated by the school's 
outstanding performance on the state MCAS tests. All 281 students in the 
Class of 2004 earned the State Competency Determination by passing the MCAS 
Test in both English Language Arts and Mathematics. 

In the Spring of 2004, the school's 298 sophomores performed significantly 
above the state average and ranked second among vocational technical schools. 
Eighty-eight percent (263) passed both parts of the MCAS Test. Ninety-one 
percent (272) of these tenth graders passed the Mathematics MCAS on their 
initial attempt, significantly improving on all preceding local performances. 



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At the same time, ninety-four percent (281) of these sophomores passed the 
English Language Arts component of the test, continuing the school's pre- 
eminent performance in this area. Special populations have seen especially 
impressive testing performance gains. Of the 107 tenth graders receiving 
special education services, 93 passed the MCAS Tests as sophomores. 

Curriculum alignment with the Massachusetts Frameworks and professional 
development opportunities for teachers contributed significantly to improved 
academic performance in all of the academic disciplines. The school is 
currently preparing for MCAS field tests in science and social studies. 
Members of the science faculty serve on the MCAS Test Development Committee. 
More than 40 physics students have joined the American Physics Institute. 

New Staff: In response to the recent retirement of three veteran teachers, 
the District hired two new mathematics instructors and one new Social Studies 
Instructor. Shawsheen is extremely pleased to announce the addition of Todd 
Karkane and Courtney Kelley to the Mathematics faculty, and Michael Buckley 
to the Social Studies faculty. 

Student Clubs and Activities 

Oratory; Shawsheen students continue to impress in local speech contests. 
For the past three years Shawsheen students have progressed to the Zone and 
District levels . 

Newspaper and Literary Magazine: From writing to photography and layout, 
Shawsheen students have demonstrated considerable academic and vocational 
talents by producing regular editions of the school newspaper. The Rampage, 
as well as the Shawsheen Tech literary magazine, Ramhlings . 

Community Involvement : Working together, students from all four grade levels 
demonstrated their commitment to helping others. They organized "Operation 
Santa" and sent care packages to U.S. Troops serving in Iraq. The Student 
Council collected donations for both the Billerica Food Pantry and for the 
Lowell Sun Santa drive. Topping the list of charitable acts was the Holiday 
Party for children from area homeless shelters. Approximately 60 small 
children along with parents/guardians spent a fun-filled night at the school 
and took home happy hearts and armfuls of gifts. 

School Spirit: School loyalty and spirit, along with individual's enthusiasm 
and hard work, are the foundation for the many class and club activities at 
Shawsheen Tech that contribute to the school's positive atmosphere that 
permeates the facility and is palpable in the hallways, cafeteria, and 
library. The school buzzes with activity from 7:00 a.m. until well after the 
regular day. Students produce a daily news TV show and also participate in 
Billerica Access Television broadcasts. From Homecoming to the Spring Show 
and the All Night Graduation Party, Shawsheen students, teachers, parents and 
support staff continually generate ideas and generously donate their time to 
enrich the high-school experience of SVTHS ' students. 

Athletics 

For the fourth time in eight years, the athletic program was honored as the 
recipient of the prestigious Walter Markham Award, presented annually by the 
Boston Globe in recognition of the most successful vocational school athletic 
program in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Over 365 students participated in interscholastic athletics, capturing 
Commonwealth Athletic Conference championships in football, cheerleading, 
boys' basketball, basketball cheerleading, girls' soccer and wrestling. 
SVTHS' state-tournament qualifiers included the boys' soccer, girls' soccer. 



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boys' basketball, girls' basketball, ice hockey, baseball, softball, and 
lacrosse teams. The wrestling and softball teams won state vocational 
titles. The baseball and boys' basketball teams also qualified for the state 
vocational tournament. 

In addition to these outstanding teams, SVTHS athletics developed exemplary 
individual athletes. Jennifer Elwell of Tewksbury was selected to the Boston 
Globe and Boston Herald All -Scholastic softball team for the third 
consecutive year. She also surpassed the 1 , 000 -strikeout plateau, making her 
the only vocational athlete to achieve this distinguished milestone. 

Building and Grounds 

The Building and Grounds Department completed many projects during 2004. In 
April, construction began on a new day-care center that services the children 
and grandchildren of Shawsheen faculty and staff. The project was completed 
in August and became operational at the beginning of the school year. 

Many repairs and modifications to the building were made during the summer, 
especially during a planned two-week facility closure in August. Work crews 
including a group of inmates from the Billerica House of Correction who 
painted the cafeteria and some hallway walls, maintained a rigorously 
coordinated schedule that resulted in the installation of 5,000 square feet 
of hallway tile, the electrostatic painting of 500 lockers, and the 
rebuilding of the nursing lab, a project that required electrical, plumbing, 
wall, counter- top, and cabinet modifications. During the same time, workers 
replaced the floor in the Internet shop, fifteen heating and cooling units in 
the front of the building, and twenty door handles to accommodate handicap 
access. In addition, isolation valves were installed in the ceiling to 
facilitate the subsequent installation of eyewash and deluge shower stations 
in shops. Finally, the brown metal wrapping surrounding the exterior of the 
school was painted. 

Community Services 

Adult Evening School: The Adult Evening School continues to offer a wide 
variety of opportunities to adults interested in expanding their vocational 
and technical knowledge and skills. More than thirty courses are offered 
during both the fall and spring semesters. The enrollment in these courses 
has exceeded six hundred adult learners during the past year. Course 
offerings include a variety of traditional vocational programs such as 
welding, electrical, woodworking and collision repair as well as technical 
programs in Adobe Photoshop, web design, computer repair and computer 
applications. Residents interested in taking these and other types of 
practical courses are encouraged to call Mr. Raymond Callahan, Adult 
Education Coordinator, at (978) 671-3679 for information and/or a brochure. 

School of Practical Nursing: During June commencement exercises, the School 
of Practical Nursing graduated its tenth class, comprising 34 Licensed 
Practical Nurses (LPN) . Since its inception in September of 1994, a total of 
357 students have successfully graduated from this program and have gone on 
to rewarding careers as Licensed Practical Nurses. This intense ten-month 
program offers qualified adults a combination of evening coursework and 
clinical externship experiences that prepare aspiring healthcare 
professionals for the LPN exam. The significance and benefit of this 
valuable program to the community is magnified by the extreme shortages of 
qualified healthcare professionals that exists both locally and nationally. 
Residents interested in applying to the LPN program are urged to contact the 
Director of the School of Practical Nursing, Ms. Patricia Noonan, at (978) 
671-3646 . 



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Middle School Career Awareness : Over 400 middle school students from 
District sixth, seventh, and eighth grades participated in after-school, 
career awareness activities during the winter of 2004. Students spent five 
hours exploring each of twelve different career path options aligned with the 
manufacturing, transportation, services, information technology and 
construction industries. Mr. Anthony Celata administers this program. He 
can be reached at (978) 671-3615 for registration information. The program 
is free of charge and is available to District middle school students. 
Busing is provided by SVTHS . 

Tech Prep: SVTHS is very proud of the articulation agreements that it has 
developed with nine local colleges. Through the nationally recognized Tech 
Prep program, these agreements provide qualified SVTHS students the 
opportunity to receive college credit for coursework completed prior to high 
school graduation. Students receive post-secondary credit when they 
matriculate into a degree program at one of the nine institutions. These 
Tech Prep articulation agreements serve to further develop career paths for 
our graduates, maximize their interest in obtaining advanced degrees in their 
vocational -technical areas and assure that students are engaged in a post- 
secondary educational career path that is both relevant and rewarding. 
Ongoing negotiations with several union and open-shop apprenticeship programs 
focus on articulated advanced placement for qualified students who choose to 
enter apprentice programs upon graduation. 

Summer School: SVTHS offered twenty-one courses to one hundred and forty- 
five students from surrounding towns and school systems during the summer of 
2004. Courses were offered in English 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12; Mathematics 8, 
9, 10; Algebra 1; Algebra 2; Geometry; U.S. History; World History 
(Civilization); World Cultures; Social Studies; Civics; Lab Physical Science; 
Lab Biology; Earth Science; and Physical Education. Many courses were team 
taught, requiring students to complete integrated research tasks in a state- 
of-the-art PC lab. In addition, developmental and remedial instruction was 
offered by certified Consulting Teachers of Reading using traditional and 
technologically assisted instruction. Individual and small-group pull-out 
tutoring was available for students whose Educational Plans stipulate these 
services. Individuals seeking summer school information should contact Dr. 
Robert Kanellas, the Summer School Coordinator, at 978-671-3631. 

Swim Programs: SVTHS offered several high-quality swim programs on a year- 
round basis during 2004 in its Olympic-sized swimming pool. Youth swim 
lessons, water aerobics, and family swim programs were available on a 
regularly scheduled basis during the winter, spring, summer and fall seasons. 
In addition, the Shawsheen pool acts as the home site for interscholastic 
high school swim teams from the Billerica, Bedford and Burlington public 
schools. During the summer months, local organizations and Recreation 
Departments from Wilmington, Tewksbury and Burlington schedule pool hours as 
part of their respective programs. Individuals seeking swim program 
information should contact Mr. Anthony Fiore, Aquatic Director, at 978-671- 
3699. 

Computer Services 

Student Information System: Using the iPASS student information system, the 
Computer Services staff completed the 2004 academic school year in compliance 
with all Department of Education and District reporting requirements. The 
local iPASS system was modified to report on the 52 data elements required by 
the Department of Education, which last year required only 35 elements. 
During the summer, all academic student scheduling as well as ninth grade 
exploratory scheduling was completed for the highest student enrollment in 
Shawsheen history. For the first time, the "welcome back to school" letter 
to parents was also generated by the iPASS system. Work continued on the 



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Certificate of Occupational Proficiency report that allows vocational 
teachers to provide each student with a detailed report of the student's 
competencies in their shop area. With the addition of a new secure front-end 
server, teachers were also able to enter their quarterly progress report and 
report card grades from home for students in their classes. In addition, the 
new iPASS Parent Access Manager was introduced and enthusiastically received 
for parents to be able to view up to date information on their children in 
the areas of attendance, grades, schedules and discipline information. 

Computer Network: During the year, a new firewall with an enhanced content 
filter for web access was installed. In the spring, a new District e-mail 
server was installed to handle Microsoft Exchange 2003, and a front-end web 
server was added to provide e-mail access for staff from home using the web. 
During the summer, a new front -end web server, donated by Sun Microsystems, 
was installed to provide web access to the iPASS system for teachers and 
parents. Also during the summer, the network staff changed the District's 
Internet Service Provider (ISP) , providing a substantial cost reduction to 
the District. In September, the staff also implemented a SPAM filter that is 
eliminating over 400,000 SPAM e-mails per year from the school's network. The 
network staff continues to upgrade the virus protection system as well as the 
Microsoft system updates for all of the computers in the District. The 
computer-service staff also implemented some of the group policy features of 
Windows 2 003 Active Directory to better manage student use of the network. 

Applications: The computer staff installed the new Kurzweil text-to-speech 
software system for use by the Support Services Department students, for whom 
the software converts printed text to audio text. The computer lab in room 
501 utilized the new Net Support School product that allows teachers to 
monitor all the computers in the lab from the teacher workstation and also 
allows peer interaction. The computer services department continues to 
maintain the Plato application for the Mathematics Department and the Success 
Maker reading and math modules for the English and Support Services 
Departments . 

Staff: Sadly, Mary Roach, a computer network technician in the Computer 
Services Department, died after a courageous battle with breast cancer. 

Guidance 

Admissions: Continuing a statewide and District trend, applications for the 
freshmen class entering in September 2004 increased significantly. The 
Guidance Department received almost 600 applications and enrolled 335 
freshmen for the Class of 2009. 

College and Career Planning Night: This year's College and Career Planning 
Night again attracted a large number of junior and senior students and their 
parents. Over 450 people attended this popular event. While most of the 
participants were Shawsheen students, invitations were also extended to their 
peers in the five-town District. 

The number of colleges and local employers participating in this year's event 
also increased. Thirty-five local colleges and career schools sent 
representatives, as did all branches of the Armed Forces. Representatives 
from the industrial community included a mix of traditional trade areas as 
well as a significant number of technical areas. 

A comprehensive workshop provided a detailed overview on the process, 
resources, and strategies for acquiring post-secondary financial assistance. 
Shawsheen was fortunate to team with the Massachusetts Educational Financial 
Authority (MEFA) in this endeavor. The workshop was followed-up by a 
Financial Aid Night in January in which students and parents had the 
opportunity to work on and ask detailed questions about the Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. 



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Co-Operative Education Program: Participation in the Co-Operative Education 
Program increased by approximately 30% over that of the previous two years. 
A state directed co-operative student evaluation is being phased in for the 
first time. The evaluation, completed by the local participating employers, 
is designed to address participant students' academic, technical, and 
employability skills. The evaluation process enhances the co-operative 
education experience of eligible students by identifying and implementing the 
skills requisite in evolving employment markets. 

According to a plan currently in the planning stages, all seniors opting to 
participate in the co-operative program will be required to enroll in and 
pass a ten-hour Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Safety 
Program for construction and general industry. Some students (depending on 
their career path) may opt to enroll in and pass an on-line ten-hour career 
training session. 

Scholarships and Awards: Shawsheen graduates received numerous awards from 
colleges, career schools, and the state-sponsored scholarship program that 
recognizes academic excellence. Approximately $60,000 in scholarships from 
local community organizations and Shawsheen affiliates complemented the 
monetary awards. And once again, the industrial community generously 
contributed tool and equipment awards to students entering their occupational 
fields upon graduation. 

School Council 

Principal Robert E. Cunningham reports early indications that recent policy 
changes are positively affecting student attendance. After much discussion, 
the School Council recommended comprehensive changes in the Student Handbook, 
raising the consequence for poor attendance. Results from an analysis of 
relevant data point to an increase in student attendance from 94.3% during 
the 2003-2004 school year to 95.2% for the same period in the 2004-2005 
school year. This policy change was designed to reinforce Shawsheen' s 
philosophy that recognizes the qualitative values of persistence, self- 
discipline, and pride in producing quality work. 

Technical Programs 

Automotive; The Automotive program continues to meet all standards required 
by the National Automotive Technical Education Foundation (NATEF) in the 
areas of curriculum, equipment, tools and teacher certifications. All 
instructors in the program are Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified 
expert technicians and are committed to keeping their knowledge and skills 
current. As a result of their commitment, students are prepared to meet the 
standards of a constantly changing industry. 

To fill the instructional vacancy resulting from the June retirement of Dan 
Shea, Richard Lavoie joined the Automotive faculty. Mr. Lavoie, a highly 
experienced ASE certified expert technician who has taught for 15 years, 
immediately introduced many new tenth-grade curriculum projects that enhance 
students' readiness for live work in the subsequent grades. Ben Hurley, who 
replaced Dan Shea as Transportation Department Chair, has modified the 
Automotive related curriculum by redesigning the related classroom to enhance 
instructional strategies, student activities, and as a result, access to and 
utilization of the facility. The redesign continues to support students' 
access to the Automotive Information System software via twenty on-line 
computers at their desk. Automotive Information System is an unlimited 
curriculum and resource for safe auto repair instruction, technical 
information and the latest updates on specific jobs. The program also allows 
teachers to obtain lesson plans for job specific repairs and data repair for 
every car used for demonstration or service. 



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The visual and manipulatable instructional aids in the related facility 
include engine mock-ups, parts displays, posters and a full size break away 
car all of which are integrated into formal related instruction. These 
resources serve as invaluable instructional resources for students of all 
levels of ability. 

The Automotive program continues to respond to vehicle repair requests from 
District towns, including many requests from elderly citizens. The students 
also maintain all the school-owned vehicles, which are used for outside 
construction programs and nursing externships . These experiences provide the 
student with live work that would not otherwise be available. 

Automotive seniors received ten hours of OSHA general industry safety 
training and received 10 -hour cards to document their participation. This 
inaugural Shawsheen effort will enhance the seniors' employment and earning 
potential . 

Auto Body: The Auto Body program is in the process of updating curriculum 
and equipment in preparation for its National Automotive Technician Education 
Foundation (NATEF) recertif ication visit this year. In the past, the program 
has met all the required standards for equipment, curriculum and teachers' 
certifications. Meeting NATEF' s strenuous standards is an important goal for 
new instructor, Roland Tremblay, as he adapts to his new instructional 
environment. Mr. Tremblay brings 30 years of experience along with his work 
with NATEF to the Auto Body instructional team, as they prepare to secure 
recertif ication and, toward that end to improve the quality of automotive 
service and repair. 

Under Mr. Tremblay' s tutelage, students now use single and two-stage paints; 
they mix their own paint; and they use new, portable, hand-held, ventilated 
Sanders, which have positively affected the air quality in the shop. 

The redesign of the transportation computer lab has allowed the Auto Body 
students continued access to the NATEF curriculum on the Internet and has 
provided for a wider range of curriculum activities. This curriculum keeps 
students up to date with the latest automotive technology. The Auto Body 
program has continued its on-line safety program this year, which provides 
students with a safety certificate that is recognized throughout the 
industry. 

Along with their Automotive peers, senior Auto Body students received ten 
hours of OSHA general industry safety training and received 10 -hour cards to 
document their participation. Similar, again, to their Automotive peers, 
Auto Body students continue to respond to vehicle repair requests from 
District towns, including many requests from elderly citizens, and they 
maintain school-owned vehicles. 

Heating Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (HVAC-R) : The HVAC-R 
program continues to secure required instructional equipment through capital 
budget purchases and donations. Training students on the state-of-the-art 
equipment is critical to prepare students for the expectations of prospective 
employers. Many of these donations were obtained from local businesses and 
advisory members who have supported the program for years. Subsequent to the 
donation of an oil-fired boiler, the instructors integrated oil-heat 
objectives in the curriculum. HVAC-R instructor Kevin Buckley also 
facilitated this curriculum addition by earning oil-burns certification in 
the fall. Other donations include three condensing units and a gas-fired 
furnace . 



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An important training component of the HVAC-R program is the real community 
work requested by District communities, which recently included the 
installation of a gas furnace and ductwork at the Howe Museum; the conversion 
of an oil furnace to a gas furnace and central air conditioning system at the 
Billerica VFW; the installation of an oil furnace and ductwork at the West 
Schoolhouse ; and design, calculation and installation of two central A/C 
systems for house projects in Wilmington. In addition, students participated 
in major school projects, providing maintenance and troubleshooting services 
that assist SVTHS's Building and Grounds efforts and provide substantial cost 
savings to the District. 

The HVAC-R instructors have initiated the certification process with 
Partnership for Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Accreditation 
(PAHRA) . This is a three-year process. When completed, SVTHS's HVAC-R 
program will be the first program of its kind in the state to obtain this 
national and prestigious certification. 

Business Information Services : The business program has introduced a new 
certification course called IC3 Basic to sophomores. At the completion of 
the course, the students will receive an Internet and computing core 
certification, which recognizes their understanding of computer functions as 
well as their ability to make minor PC repairs. Students are also receiving 
certifications in Microsoft applications, which include Word, Excel, Access 
and Power Point fundamental and important skills possessed by competent 
workers in the current business environment. 

Through the efforts of Linda Swasey, the business program now has a chapter 
of Business Professionals of America. This organization exists to promote 
business opportunities and competitions for business students in high school. 
Eleven students have joined the organization and will compete in marketing 
and business competition at the state level . Those who succeed at the state 
level will have the opportunity to compete at the national level. 

The students have had the chance to hear and attend seminars from guest 
speakers, many businesses, and colleges. The seminars included: Customer 
Service by Pat Morrow, Middlesex College; Protocol Around the World, 
Katharine Gibbs College and Going Global, Macintosh College 

The marketing curriculum has been expanded again this year to increase 
students' opportunities upon graduation. Competencies are developed through 
the operation of the school's store and handling the compilation, collection, 
and distribution of the morning food break orders for the entire school. 

Carpentry : The Carpentry Department, along with all the construction trades, 
is in the process of constructing a 3,000 square foot colonial house. The 
house is being built for a Wilmington resident who placed her name in the 
school's house lottery last spring. The house-building program provides 
students the opportunity to develop skills in framing, exterior finish, 
roofing and interior finish. This outside project not only provides students 
with valuable live work in which to develop knowledge and skills but also 
helps instill strong work ethics and a commitment to a customer. With the 
retirement of Courtney Lloyd and the hiring of Richard Weadick, this year the 
Carpentry Department continues to support District projects that have 
included the completion of the Billerica Housing Authority House Project, the 
renovation of the Billerica Howe Museum, the Bennett Library Deck Project, 
the re-roofing of the Elks Pavilion, the construction of a Pavilion at 
Tewksbury Playground, the restoration of Wilmington West Schoolhouse, and the 
construction of a Wilmington West Intermediate School sign. 

These projects provide valuable work experience for the students, and they 
result in tremendous savings to District towns and organizations. 

All seniors again received a 10-hour OSHA card in construction safety. 



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Cosmetology: The Cosmetology Program has expanded its community service 
program in which teachers accompany sophomore and senior students to District 
nursing homes, senior centers and assisted-living facilities. Cosmetology 
students have visited and provided services at senior centers in Tewksbury, 
Bedford, Wilmington, Billerica and Burlington. In addition, students 
continue to service the elderly on Elderly Citizens' Day by providing beauty 
makeovers and a lunch in the dining room. These types of programs provide 
students with real live work and, at the same time, instill compassion for 
the elderly. Many local citizens also take advantage of cosmetology services 
at the school on a regular basis. 

In the beginning of September the students began learning a software program 
called Cyber Imaging, which was recommended by the Advisory Committee. This 
software will give students the skill and knowledge to obtain employment in 
salons with the latest technology in hair design. 

The instructors proudly announce that, as a result of their ongoing 
commitment to industry-aligned curriculum standards, all of last year's 
graduates received state cosmetology licenses. 

Culinary Arts: The Culinary Arts Department is in the final stages of 
preparing for its accreditation by the American Culinary Association. The 
process of updating curriculum and equipment to meet the standards of the 
American Culinary Federation (ACF) has been on going for the last two years. 
Completion of the necessary documentation and an evaluation of the program by 
the ACF are being planned for this year. Once the program receives this 
certification, the students will have the opportunity to take the ACF exam 
and receive their ACF credentials. Because of a new safety curriculum 
implemented this year, many of the culinary students have gained knowledge 
and skills that prepared them to take the Serve Safe certification exam, 
which many have received. Many food establishments require this credential 
as a condition of employment today. 

The operation of the guest dining room continues to be a valuable component 
of the Culinary program. The dining room allows the public to have an 
enchanting Culinary experience four days a week for a very reasonable cost. 
The Culinary Department recently planned, prepared and served 250 meals to 
Advisory Committee members during their annual meeting. In addition, 
Culinary students prepared meals for four citizenship awards banquets. 

Another key component of the Culinary program is the bakery. In the bakery 
program, the students learn to bake creative breads and pastry, and they 
operate an on-site retail bakery, which is open to the public four days a 
week. The bakery also supplies many items to the Culinary program for the 
students' break service. 

Diesel: The Diesel program is certified by the National Automotive Technical 
Education Foundation (NATEF) , with the instructors' meeting Automotive 
Service Excellence (ASE) certifications in all areas of instruction. John 
Havens, a SVTHS Diesel instructor, is also an evaluation- team leader for the 
organization, which allows him to stay current with all regulation changes 
each year. In addition to NATEF, the program maintains national 
certifications in Mechanical Repair Pollution Prevention and an online safety 
program called SP2 . 

The senior Diesel students received 10 hours of training in OSHA General 
Industry Safety last September and received a 10-hour card. 

Some of the work projects students have accomplished this year include the 
overhaul of a box van donated to SVTHS and the reconditioning of the fuel 
system, transmission, and brakes for a donated handicap van. 



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Drafting : The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/Technical School is the 
first school in the Commonwealth to earn recertif ication by the American 
Drafting and Design Association (ADDA) . This was made possible by the 
commitment and hard work of the instructors, who maintained up-to-date trade 
standards in a rapidly evolving industry. Drafting instructor, Andy 
Botticelli, chairs the Massachusetts Curriculum Committee for the 
organization and provides support to other vocational schools in the 
Commonwealth who have applied for certification. Many senior students 
received ADDA certification for the first time last year. 

Software programs on which Drafting students are developing skills include 
Auto-CAD, Solid Modeling, Pro-E, and G.I.S Terrain Modeling. Although the 
students adhere to a strict and vigorous curriculum, they still have the 
chance to gain real project experience by providing renovation designs and 
construction drawings for the Masonry Department, the school store, the 
nurse's office, and the Wilmington West Schoolhouse. 

The efforts of the Drafting instructors has resulted in the most 
technologically advanced drafting program in the state but, more importantly, 
in outstanding employment and post secondary opportunities for Drafting 
students upon graduation. 

Electronics : Through capital budget funding, the Electronics program was 
able to complete the second phase of their Lab-Volt and NIDA computer based 
instructional equipment purchases. To fully exploit the instructional 
technology, the Electronics faculty developed new curriculum, which exposes 
the students to a much broader and more rigorous range of projects. In 
addition, the curriculum was revised to include computer repair at the 
sophomore level, which resulted in eight students receiving A+ certification 
this year. 

At the start of this school year, the students were welcomed with a new, 
completely furnished related classroom. Desks in the new room were 
constructed in the Carpentry shop, which saved the District a significant 
expense. The addition of the new related room has provided a much quieter 
and safer environment for the students to learn electronic theory. 

Electrical : The Electrical students continue to gain a wide range of 
competencies through outside projects. They obtained skills and knowledge in 
the industrial aspect of the field this past year by completing the wiring 
for the new heating and air conditioning system installed in the 
administrative offices. Other school projects included the rewiring of all 
lathes and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines in the Machine Shop, and 
the wiring of machines in the Graphic Arts Shop. The students develop 
maintenance and trouble -shooting skills by providing ongoing support for the 
school's Maintenance staff. The outside community projects in which the 
Electrical students have been involved include the Howe Museum in Billerica, 
the West Schoolhouse in Wilmington and the house-building project in 
Wilmington. The experience the students obtain doing the rough and finish 
wiring at the house-building project prepares them for residential employment 
upon graduation. 

Student enrollment in the Electrical shop again necessitated changes in the 
shop workstations. The new workstations supported more comprehensive junior 
and senior rough-wiring projects. In addition, the mock framed wall area 
where sophomores practice house wiring was redesigned. 

Through the capital budget process, the program purchased new ladders and 
staging equipment for the shop and outside program. 



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Graphic Arts: In September, Timothy Broadrick joined the Graphic Arts 
faculty and immediately began to assist in the implementation of rigorous 
curriculum and technological changes in the Graphic Arts program. His 
extensive experience and knowledge of the Graphic Arts industry strengthens 
the program in the area of pre-press. 

The Graphic Arts Department purchased six new G5 computers and new software 
to keep pace with an industry evolving from film to digital processing. With 
the professional oversight and advice of its Advisory Committee, the Graphics 
staff submitted a renovation and purchase plan to the Capital -Budget 
Committee to accommodate the transition to state-of-the-art industry 
standards. The administration, acting on the recommendation of the Capital- 
Budget Committee, approved and funded the project, which will begin this 
spring . 

The students in the Graphic Arts program develop valuable competencies by 
completing various printing projects for the school and District towns. The 
students also oversee the copying center, where teachers and administrators 
request or execute copies of materials like informational handouts and 
instructional worksheets. 

Health; The Health seniors, all of whom are participating in the externship 
program, secured placement at a medical facility or nursing home during the 
first week of school. The externship program provides work experience under 
real conditions, training that is not possible in a school setting. Many of 
this year's seniors have been placed on co-op as Certified Nursing 
Assistants, Medical Assistants, and Child Care Aides. The current placement 
rates of seniors in both the externship and co-op programs strongly suggest 
that the Health curriculum effectively targets competencies required in the 
current employment market . 

During the past summer, the two Health labs were totally renovated by staff 
members of the construction shops, who installed new ceilings, Corian counter 
tops, tile flooring, lighting and cabinets by the opening day in September. 
As a result of these renovations, the purchase of new lab equipment, and 
specific curriculum revision and updating, the program met all standards of, 
and was therefore endorsed by, the National Health Association (NHA.) The 
NHA granted clinical and administration certifications. As a result of 
targeted curricular changes and the increase of professional staff, the 
American Heart Association currently offers students the opportunity to earn 
a certificate in CPR and First Aid. 

The Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) program currently has 30 full-time 
evening students working at Tewksbury Hospital, Lowell General Hospital, and 
New England Pediatrics. The LPN students begin their studies in August each 
year and graduate the following June. Of the 35 members of last year's 
graduating class, 34 passed their state board examination and received their 
LPN certification. 

Internet: In 2004, the Internet program received a donation of 50 computers 
from industry for use in the computer repair component of the program, saving 
the school a substantial amount of capital budget money. These computers 
provided the students with resources for developing the skills and knowledge 
required of the industry's A+ exam. As a result, many Internet students 
passed the software and hardware portion of the A+ exam in December and 
received their certification. Internet students are also preparing for and 
taking Microsoft Application exams. 

In order to strengthen the hands-on work experience for the students, the 
Internet program has initiated a computer repair service for the staff and 
school programs . 



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In the computer-programming and web-design component of the program, students 
continue to maintain the school's website (http://www.shawsheen.tec.ma.us). 
Internet students have also been working with the Massachusetts National 
Guard to improve its website. 

Machine Technology: The Machine Technology program is certified by the 
National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) . The program has met all 
NIMS standards for curriculum, equipment, and staff credentialing . 
Maintaining this certification is contingent upon students' earning 
credentials which requires a minimum of 25% of them to pass the Level I exam, 
and 50% to pass the Level II exam. As a result of the program's meeting 
these criteria, NIMS has extended the certification until January 1, 2005. 
Because of the quality of the Machine Technology program and the 
qualifications of the program's faculty, NIMS has recruited Shawsheen 
instructors to become part of their evaluation team for other schools 
throughout the state. For the second time last June, graduates qualified to 
take the NIMS certification exam. Eighty percent of the graduates took the 
exam and received the desired credentials. 

Because of the closing of a machine program in the western part of the state, 
the school was able to purchase a CNC lathe and milling machine at a fraction 
of its value. It has been installed and is now a valuable piece of equipment 
in the shop. This purchase has provided more students with important 
training time on CNC machinery. This training is critical in an industry 
that continues to demand, in large number, trained CNC technicians. 

Recently, the school purchased twenty CNC software program licenses to 
support important changes in the senior related curriculum. The software has 
been installed in one of the school's computer labs, facilitating instruction 
and learning. 

Machine Technology students have completed several projects to gain work 
experience on facility-based tasks and to support the needs of other programs 
throughout the school. Toward these ends. Machine Technology students have 
made new door signs for all garage doors, designed and made golf tournament 
gifts, and machine parts for many machine maintenance repairs. 

Masonry: The Masonry students recently completed work on the baseball 
dugouts, a sophisticated professional task that required them to match the 
architectural design of the field house using similar brick and quoin 
corners. The workmanship of the project compares favorably to any in the 
trade. As a follow up to the dugout and field house projects, the students 
will construct a new brick storage building, whose architectural design will 
also match that of other structures on school grounds. In addition, the 
instructors are in the process of obtaining all the materials necessary to 
construct a new addition to the shop. The addition will allow them to 
integrate larger and more complicated curriculum projects into the program. 

The Masonry program has supported the community with projects that include 
the Wilmington West Schoolhouse, the Tewksbury Playground Pavilion, the 
Billerica Howe Museum, the Tewksbury Telescope Building, and the Billerica 
Bennett Library. 

As part of their curriculum requirement this year, senior Masonry students 
completed a ten-hour OSHA safety course, enhancing their employment 
opportunities upon graduation. 

Metal Fabrication: The Metal Fabrication program has again upgraded its 
equipment. Using capital budget funds, the program purchased three new 
welding machines. 



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Because the Metal Fabrication program is a NIMS certified program, the 
students will have the opportunity to take the NIMS certification exam this 
year. This certification is the most widely accepted in the industry. 
Students who obtain NIMS certification earn skill recognition, establish 
professional credentials in the work place, and enhance their employment 
potential and options. 

In October, the welding program was granted national certification by the 
American Welding Society (AWS) . The staff worked hard for several months on 
the implementation of curriculum changes that aligned the welding program 
with rigorous AWS standards. As a result, students will be able earn a 
certificate that is recognized throughout the industry. 

Like students in other programs, the senior Metal Fabrication students 
received 10 hours of training in OSHA General Industry Safety last September 
and received a 10 hour card. 

And like students in other programs, Metal Fabrication students have gained 
work experience and supported the community and school with projects that 
include the fabrication of dock parts for the Yankee Clipper Council Boy 
Scouts of America, the fabrication of North Billerica Baptist Church heating 
ducts, the fabrication of Parent -Council and golf -tournament gifts, and 
assistance on repairs to school facility. 

Plun±)ing : Community and school projects are an important part of the 
Plumbing program's curriculum, as they provide students with real live work. 
These projects give the students the opportunities to improve basic 
competencies learned at the lower grade level and to add new field-based 
skills and knowledge. Outside community projects such as the Billerica Howe 
Museum and the Wilmington West Schoolhouse allowed the students to develop 
industrial skills. Participating in the completion of the house project for 
the Billerica Housing Authority and the construction of the Wilmington 
schoolhouse project ensured that the junior and senior students gained skills 
and knowledge in residential construction. The development of 
troubleshooting skills is an important program component accomplished through 
the program's maintenance curriculum, which benefits the school's plumbing 
system and saves the District operational money. The repair and installation 
of eyewash stations throughout the school was an important maintenance 
project completed this year. Efforts from the Plumbing Department, as well 
as from the other construction programs, make SVTHS a safer place for 
students to learn and for staff to work. 

New equipment used to connect copper tubing was purchased recently, and the 
curriculum was updated to give students experience in this new technology. 
Through shop projects and maintenance work around the building, students will 
be using this new flange-flaring tool to connect copper tubing. 

The senior Plumbing students received 10 hours of training in OSHA General 
Industry Safety last September and received a 10 hour card in construction 
safety . 

Technical Illustration : Technical Illustration has been given preliminary 
approval to expand its shop area to alleviate the crowded situation in the 
shop. The additional space will allow the instructors to expand the 
curriculum to include more freehand and creative projects. 

Meeting the requests and needs of the sending towns and school involves the 
students in live work, tasks usually accompanied by demanding time lines, and 
rigorous quality standards. Technical Illustration students participated in 
signage projects for the interior and grounds of the school, for the 
Wilmington West Intermediate School, and for the golf tournament. In 
addition. Technical Illustration students assisted in the Billerica Veteran 
Organization Project. 



SKILLS USA: SKILLS USA is a national organization allowing 
vocational/technical students the opportunity to enter specific skill 
competition and participate in numerous leadership events. 

At the North District Conference last spring, 96 Shawsheen students competed 
and won 40 medals. Of those 40 students, 28 went on to win a medal in state 
competition, which included 6 gold medals. Three gold medal winners went on 
to compete at the national level and did an outstanding job representing 
SVTHS in the area of Business, Diesel, and Internet. 

Certificate of Occupational Proficiency (COP): The COP is the Commonwealth's 
assessment program for technical education. It is being designed to measure 
the attainment of industry-based skill standards of students enrolled in 
technical education. 

By June of 2005, the work of developing a framework for all vocational/ 
technical programs throughout the state will be completed, which will be the 
base for development of the assessment piece for attainment of a Certificate 
of Occupational Proficiency. 

Shawsheen has taken a leadership role in the COP process with many of our 
instructors providing their expertise as committee chairpersons and/or 
members . 

Safety: The school is in the third year of a five-year process of developing 
and implementing a school-wide safety and health plan, under the direction of 
Roger Bourgeois, Director of Community Services, and John Lavoie, Director of 
Vocational/Technical Programs. Using both general and program- specif ic 
safety criteria, the committee is developing a plan that examines work 
practices, equipment, tools, environmental issues and educational curricula 
in all programs. The committee overseeing the development and implementation 
includes administrators, teachers, students and safety experts from industry. 

The implementation of the plan began last year with a vocational staff member 
in each program developing a safety plan which included updated safety 
curriculum for each piece of equipment and work practices. A student record 
safety plan consistent throughout each program has been put into place this 
year. A safety audit is conducted in each program to evaluate shop equipment 
and environment at the start of each school year. As a result of the audits, 
new safety equipment needs are identified, equipment is purchased, signage is 
improved, storage practices are changed, and environmental issues are 
addressed. 

Through the efforts of Roger Bourgeois and the instructors in the 
construction and general industry programs, all the seniors in these programs 
have obtained an OSHA certification card. The students attended a ten hour 
seminar at the onset of the school year during which they learned all aspects 
of construction and general industry safety. This certification provides our 
students with more job opportunities, as many companies require this 
certification as part of a hiring policy. 

Conclusion and Acknowledgement 

The SVTHS District School Committee, staff, and students gratefully 
appreciate the support that they receive from the residents of the 5 -member 
District. The SVTHS family especially acknowledges the continued financial 
support of the local Town Managers, Finance Committees, and Town Meetings, 
who collectively ensure and perpetuate the highest quality in vocational 
technical training opportunities for area youth. 



-126- 



The District is grateful for the significant contributions provided by 
Shawsheen Tech staff and employees and acknowledges the many contributions of 
the SVTHS staff who retired during 2004. Those retirees are: 



• Paul Ayotte, Multi-Media Specialist 

• Kenneth Gabriel, Mathematics Instructor 

• David Kaufman, Auto Body Instructor 

• Courtney Lloyd, Carpentry Aide 

• Lawrence Marquis, Mathematics Instructor 

• William Ritchie, Physical Education Instructor 

• Daniel Shea, Automotive Instructor 

• Mark Small, Guidance Counselor 

• Judy Sweeney, Health Technology Instructor 

• John Viveiros, Social Studies Instructor 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Plaoeieg & Cooservatioo Departmeet 

The department provided a high level of service to the community in the areas 
of planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other community 
development activities in 2004. The department provided staff support to the 
Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Housing Partnership and Master Plan 
Committee. The Planning Board is responsible for administration of the 
Subdivision Control Act and Site Plan Review, recommendations on zoning 
amendments and specific planning studies. The Conservation Commission is 
responsible for wetlands protection in accordance with the State Wetlands 
Protection Act. The goal of the Housing Partnership is to provide affordable 
housing for Wilmington residents through local initiatives and partnerships 
with private developers. The activities of each board are described in more 
detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

1. To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board in its review of 
subdivision and site plans. 

2. To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 
administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act, 
its associated regulations and Conservation Commission policies. 

3 . To provide coordinated review of development plans through the 
Community Development Technical Review team. 

4. To provide assistance and information to residents. 

5. To staff the Master Plan Committee and undertake implementation of 
priority recommendations of the Master Plan. 

6. To implement recommendations of the Planned Production Plan for 
affordable housing as developed by the Master Plan Committee. 

7. To implement stormwater management recommendations of the Comprehensive 
Water Resources Management Plan. 

8. To undertake other strategic planning efforts, as applicable. 

9. To revise the zoning by-laws and zoning map to enhance the character of 
the town, consistent with the Master Plan. 

10. To update the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development, consistent 
with the Master Plan. 

11. To implement recommendations of the Open Space and Recreation Plan. 



-127- 



12. To complete implementation of improvements to the Town Forest based on 
the Town Forest Plan. 

13. To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

14 . To promote environmental awareness and education to promote 
environmental stewardship. 

15. To review 40B projects and provide input to the Board of Appeals. 

16. To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership, including 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, monitoring 
of on-going developments and review of projects sponsored by 
developers . 

17. To develop and implement community development programs, including the 
Community Development Block Grant Program. 

18. To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various state 
and regional forums . 

Lynn Goonin Duncan resigned as Director of Planning & Conservation in the 
spring of 2004 after thirteen years of dedicated service. The new Director 
is Carole Hamilton. She staffs the Planning Board and Master Plan Committee, 
and provides technical assistance to the Housing Partnership. She chairs the 
Community Development Technical Review Team and the Property Review Board, 
coordinating the review of development projects and the disposition of town- 
owned land. She serves as the point person for review of 4 OB affordable 
housing projects and provides input to the Board of Appeals. The Director 
serves as the representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) , 
the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning 
Council (NSPC) , acting as the liaison between the town and the state on 
transportation and planning issues. 

Robert Douglas serves as the Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation 
and provides technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the 
department on wetland and environmental issues. Michael C. Vivaldi serves as 
Assistant Planner. Senior Clerks Cheryl Licciardi and Joann Roberto provide 
administrative support. 

Community Development Program 

The Community Development Block Grant Program is administered by the 
Community Development Program Office under the supervision of the Director of 
Planning & Conservation. 

The department is completing the implementation of a FY03 CDBG grant for 
housing rehabilitation in the amount of $699,930. The goal of improving 
twenty-seven (27) homes will be met. These units will all be added to the 
town's 40B inventory because there is a 15-year lien on each property 
ensuring its af f ordability . A total of 107 homes have been rehabilitated 
since the Program's inception, benefiting over 270 residents, of whom 66 are 
elderly (60+) . In July a FY04 CDBG grant was awarded to continue the housing 
rehabilitation program. The grant will enable the town to assist another 27 
Wilmington families to enhance their quality of life through rehabilitation 
of their dwellings. Typical repairs in Wilmington include roofing, plumbing, 
structural work and electrical work. Low and moderate- income residents 
residing in homes that do not meet building code are eligible to participate. 

Since 1991 the town has been awarded approximately $4 million dollars in CDBG 
funding, a significant achievement given the extremely competitive nature of 
the grant and the relative economic health of the community. These grants 
have included five housing rehabilitation programs, social service programs 
for job training and counseling and two small business loan programs. 



-128- 



The Community Development Program Office also administers the first-time 
homebuyer program funded through the North Shore HOME Consortium. 
Approximately $44,000 in federal funding will be available for FY05 for the 
Town of Wilmington. This is the eighth year of town participation with 
approximately $250,000 in funding allocated to the town during this time 
period. To date the funds have been utilized for a first-time homebuyer 
assistance program and for housing rehabilitation. Through the first-time 
homebuyer assistance program five families have been able to purchase their 
first home. The housing rehabilitation program has enabled nine low/moderate 
income households to upgrade their homes, representing 26 beneficiaries, of 
whom four are elderly. 

Program staff, who are available to assist with information or questions, 
are: James Chaput, Community Development Program Director and Paula Barry, 
Clerk/Bookkeeper. The program office is located in Town Hall. 

Special Projects: 

Town Forest Improvement Project 

The department and the Conservation Commission worked together to develop a 
Town Forest Improvement Plan, which was funded by a $150,000 grant from the 
Department of Environmental Management (now the Department of Conservation 
and Recreation) . The plan is intended to improve the accessibility and 
enjoyment of the Town Forest as a passive recreational resource, while 
providing for the proper stewardship of the Town Forest as a vibrant, 
diverse, living ecosystem. The Conservation Commission approved the Town 
Forest Management Plan, detailing the natural resources within the forest and 
presenting a preliminary plan for developing the public trail system and 
improved parking. Significant public input helped shape the plan. 
Proposed improvements include cleanup of the property, expansion and 
improvements to the parking area, construction of trails and the provision of 
recreational signage, waysides, interpretive materials and benches to enhance 
environmental education and appreciation. The project is being done in close 
coordination and cooperation with Wilmington Junior Camps. 

Master Plan 

The Master Plan Committee and the Director of Planning & Conservation, 
working with McGregor & Associates, prepared a housing plan that meets the 
"planned production" requirement of Chapter 4 OB. The notice of approval was 
followed by a request to the Department of Housing and Community Development 
for Housing Certification. Housing Certification confirms the town's 
production of affordable housing consistent with the planned production plan. 
As of November 6, 2004, for a two year period, any Chapter 40B Comprehensive 
Permit found to be inconsistent with the town's planning or affordable 
housing goals can be denied without the developer having recourse of appeal 
to the State Housing Appeals Court. Certification allows the town to 
determine which projects further goals of the Master Plan, are compatible 
with existing neighborhoods and appear consistent with affordable housing 
needs . 

The Committee is in the process of reviewing Master Plan recommendations and 
establishing priorities for implementation. 

Members include: Raymond Forest, Chairman, Kenneth Lifton, Vice Chairman, 
Michael Baker, Karen Campbell, Susanne Clarkin, Stephen Costa, Rosemary 
Cross, Robert DiPasquale, William Gately, Carolyn Harris, Arthur Hayden, Sr., 
Randi Holland, William Hooper, Jr., Jeffrey M. Hull, Sidney Kaizer, Margaret 
Kane, Vincent Licciardi, James Murray, Kathleen Reynolds, Frederick Russell, 
Debra Russo, Karl Sagal, Beverly Shea, Michael Sorrentino, Martha Stevenson, 
Barbara Sullivan, Suzanne Sullivan, James Tighe, Ernest Wallent, Jane 
Williams-Vale, Daniel Woodbury and Ann Yurek. 

-129- 



Planning Board 

The responsibilities of the Planning Board include review of subdivision and 
"Approval Not Required" plans; review of commercial and industrial site 
plans; recommendations to the Board of Appeals on variances and special 
permits; strategic and comprehensive planning; zoning amendments and 
implementation of the Master Plan. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five-year 
terms. Planning Board members are Michael Sorrentino (Chair), Ann Yurek 
(Clerk) , Randi Holland, David Shedd and James Banda, Jr. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed and approved one 
conventional subdivision, with a total of six lots. One conservation 
subdivision was also reviewed and approved. 



Conventional Subdivision 



# Lots 



Action 



Cheyenne Estates 
Conservation Subdivision 



6 

# Lots 



Approved with conditions 
Action 



Leonard Estates 
McDonald Road Estates 



8 

30 



Approved with conditions 
Withdrawn 



Conservation subdivisions, when approved, allow the developer to submit a 
definitive subdivision plan for the project. Construction does not begin on 
a Conservation Subdivision until the definitive subdivision plan is approved 
by the Planning Board. Leonard Estates will be such a submission in 2005. 

Twenty-four (24) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans were submitted, the 
Planning Board determined that twenty-two (22) plans did not require approval 
under the Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed and two plans were 
withdrawn. These plans represented a total of 2 3 new lots; several of the 
plans were lot line readjustments that did not create any new building lots. 

Development Activity 1999-2004 




■ #Subdivision 

■ ANR Plans 
□ Site Plan 



2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 



Site Plan Review 

The sixteen new site plan review applications for commercial and industrial 
projects were submitted. The Planning Board approved twelve projects with 
conditions; three are pending and two were withdrawn. These site plans 
include three proposals to improve gas stations on Main Street, while a 
fourth will demolish a derelict building across from Silver Lake and replace 
it with a small office building. 



-130- 



Zoning 



In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 4 OA, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are included in this Annual Report under "Town 
Meeting . " 

Conservation Commission 

The Wilmington Conservation Commission is charged with upholding the 
interests of the Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act. The Commission 
received 126 filings for activities under the jurisdiction of the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection (M.G.L. Chapter 131, §40 and its 
regulations at 310 CMR 10.00) in 2004. The number is the same as last year's 
total filings. Development in Wilmington and other towns in the Commonwealth 
reflects a trend of developing land adjacent to wetland resource areas, as 
undeveloped upland areas become scarce. 

Wilmington has an abundance of these wetland resource areas, including banks, 
bordering vegetated wetlands (swamps, marshes, etc.), land under water bodies 
and riverfront areas. Activities reviewed by the Commission can include tree 
removal and landscaping and construction of houses, driveways, additions, 
septic systems and subdivision roadways/utilities/drainage systems within 
100-feet of the above resource areas or 200-feet of a perennial stream. Work 
within bordering land subject to flooding (floodplain) is also subject to the 
jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission. Each filing involves one or, in 
some cases, multiple public hearings before the Commission. The Commission 
seeks to work through the permitting process with the applicant to provide 
protection of the public and private water supply, provide flood control, 
prevent storm damage and protect land containing wildlife habitats. 
Residents are encouraged to attend and provide comment relative to work near 
wetland resource areas. The hearings are generally held on the first and 
third Wednesday of each month. The agenda for hearings can be accessed at 
www. town . Wilmington .ma . us /old/ conserve . htm . 

When the Wilmington Conservation Commission was originally formed in 1964, 
its purpose was to inventory, promote, develop and conserve the town's 
natural resources. Today, the primary responsibility of the Conservation 
Commission is the administration and enforcement of the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act, (310 CMR) leaving little time to actually acquire 
and manage open space. However, with funding from the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Management (now the Department of Conservation 
and Recreation) , the Conservation Commission is delighted to be overseeing 
the development of a management plan for the Town Forest. Implementing 
effective forest management strategies and improving access (including 
parking, trailheads, signage and trail guides) are the Commission's goals. 
The significant size of the parcel (154 acres) and the fact that most of it 
is a scenic forested upland make it a very promising site for passive 
recreational activities such as hiking, horseback riding, picnicking, 
bicycling, cross-country skiing, birding and photography. The Commission 
anticipates that in 2005 the construction of the access road and parking area 
will begin. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three-year terms by the Town 
Manager. Citizens serving on the Commission in 2004 were: Chairman Judy 
Waterhouse, Vice Chairman Richard Patterson, Lisa Brothers, Frank Ingram, 
Mario Marchese, Beverly Shea and Mark Brazell. James Morris and Jolene Lewis 
resigned after many years of dedicated service. Mario Marchese joined the 
Commission during 2004. Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations, 
or filing procedures should be directed to Carole Hamilton, Director of 
Planning & Conservation. 



-131- 



statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected 
Notices of Intent Filed 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 
Abbreviated Notice of Intent of Resource Area 
Delineation Issues/Pending 

Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 
Extension Permits Issued/Denied 
Enforcement Orders Issued 
Violation Notices Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 
Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 
Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 
Emergency Certifications Issued 

Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 
Negative Determination 

Positive Determination/ Withdrawn/ Pending 
Request for Amendments/ Issued/Withdrawn/Pending 
Acres of Land Acquired 



$ 14,922.25 
56 
67 



7/0 
64 
7/1/4 
3/3/0/0 
39.38 



35/11 
3/0 
39/4/18 



279 
13/0 
8 
2 



3/0 



4 



Housing Partnership 



The Housing Partnership continued to be active, considering opportunities to 
provide affordable housing for Wilmington residents. 

The Partnership participated in developing the FY04 Housing Rehabilitation 

Program application, which was funded in July 2004, and is actively involved 

in review of 40B affordable housing developments. The 40B proposal, known as 

Crystal Commons, was reviewed by the Partnership in 2004 for suitability as a 

site for affordable housing. The Partnership responded to the proposed ; 

development and voted to not support the development as proposed. The : 

primary issues were project af f ordability , safety of pedestrian traffic 

crossing Burlington Avenue, mass and scale of the proposed buildings and 

density. 

It is the role of the Housing Partnership to review and comment on issues 
related to aff ordability, as other boards and departments comment on issues 
relating to their area of expertise, such as wetlands protection, site i 
design, drainage and traffic. • 

Housing Partnership members are Chairman Raymond Forest, Vice-chairman j 

Charles Boyle, Marilyn Cox, Gregory Erickson, Cynthia McCue, Daniel Paret, i 

Kathleen Scanlon, Suzanne Sullivan and Lester White. The Partnership meets | 

the second Wednesday of the month and welcomes the attendance of interested \ 

residents. | 

Chapter 40B ' 



As of December 2004 the town has 671 homes that qualify as affordable under 
Chapter 40B, the state's affordable housing law. This represents 9.4% of the 
housing stock, based upon the 2000 Census count of 7,141 dwellings. Under 
Chapter 40B, an eligible developer can apply for a single permit from the 
Board of Appeals for a proposed state or federally sponsored low or moderate- 
income housing development. The law allows the developer to override local 
requirements if the town has not met one of the following two conditions: 1) 
The town has not achieved 10% of its housing stock as affordable housing 
units (714 units), or 2) submitted a Planned Production Plan to the 
Department of Housing and Community Development, which is then approved, and 
a certification is issued that 2% of the town's housing stock has been 



-132- 



created as affordable units during the calendar year. During 2004 the town 
achieved 2% production and has received a two year certification. This means 
that for two years, a developer proposing a 40B Housing Development cannot 
appeal to the State Housing Appeals Court if the project is denied or the 
developer is unable to meet conditions placed on the approval. 

The best interests of the municipality are served if, during this 
certification period, the town is able to achieve the state's goal of 
providing 10% of the housing stock as affordable. 

The Director of Planning & Conservation is the point person for review of 4 OB 
proposals . 




The Metropolitan Area Planning Council is the regional planning and economic 
development district representing 101 cities and towns in metropolitan 
Boston. In addition, the Council shares oversight responsibility for the 
region's federally funded transportation program as one of 14 members of the 
Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Council's legislative mandate 
is to provide technical and professional resources to improve the physical, 
social and economic condition of its district and to develop sound responses 
to issues of regional significance. The Council provides research, studies, 
publications, facilitation and technical assistance in the areas of land use 
and the environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, 
economic development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative policy 
and interlocal partnerships that strengthen the operation of local 
governments . 

The Council is governed by 101 municipal government representatives, 21 
gubernatorial appointees, 10 state and 3 City of Boston officials. An 
Executive Committee composed of 25 members oversees agency operations and 
appoints an executive director. The agency employs approximately 3 
professional and administrative staff. Funding for Council activities is 
derived from contracts with government agencies and private entities, 
foundation grants and a per-capita assessment charged to municipalities 
within the district. 

In the past year, the Council has focused on initiatives that respond to 
regional challenges, some of which include: 

• Municipal planning: Working with more than 25 communities under the 
Executive Order 418 program. EO 418 provides communities with up to 
$30,000 in state funding to undertake overall visioning on local 
planning issues, including housing, economic development, natural 
resources and transportation. 

• Bringing advanced technology to cities and towns in the region: a 
contract with Pictometry International will provide aerial 
photographic images that municipal departments, including police and 
fire, can utilize to improve service delivery. 

• Adoption of smart growth principles: MAPC developed and adopted 
principles of good planning practice that will encourage sustainable 
patterns of growth to benefit people living throughout the metro 
Boston region. MAPC is also a founding member of the Massachusetts 
Smart Growth Alliance. 

• Metro Data Center: The Center is an official U.S. Census affiliate, 
helping to distribute demographic data throughout the region, 
including demographic, economic and housing profiles for all 101 
communities in metro Boston. 



-133- 



• Transportation planning: as vice chair of the Boston Metropolitan 
Planning Organization, MAPC worked to develop the 25-year Regional 
Transportation Plan as well as the annual Transportation Improvement 
Program, including transportation spending priorities for the region. 
We also spearheaded development of transportation spending criteria, 
taking into account environmental, economic and equity considerations. 

• Metropolitan Highway System Advisory Board: MAPC staffs this board, 
established in 1997 by the Commonwealth to advise the Massachusetts 
Turnpike Authority on issues relative to land use, air rights, zoning, 
and environmental impacts associated with development of land owned by 
the authority. 

• Regional Services Consortiums: The four regional consortiums 
established by MAPC collectively purchased $18 million in office 
supplies and highway maintenance services for its 31 member 
municipalities. The project also facilitates collegial forums among 
members' chief administrative officers focused on collaborative 
problems solving and resource sharing. MAPC recently became the 
purchasing and administrative agent for the Greater Boston Police 
Council, which assists over 300 units of local government in the 
purchase of police vehicles and other public safety supplies. 

• Metropolitan Mayors Coalition: Working with the mayors and city 
managers of 10 municipalities in the urban core on issues such as 
group purchasing, employee health insurance, security and emergency 
coordination and municipal relief legislation. 

• Homeland security: Addressing homeland security issues by 
facilitating cross -municipal partnerships between police, fire and 
emergency management departments to acquire and share equipment and, 
more generally, to plan for emergencies involving multiple 
municipalities; fiduciary agent for state/federal grant funding 
through the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety. 

• Hazard mitigation: Initiating a federally-funded partnership to 
produce a hazard mitigation plan to protect nine coastal communities 
in the event of natural disasters, including flood, winter storm, 
wind, fire and geologic hazards. 

Please visit our website, www.mapc .org , for more details about these and 
other activities. 

Metrofuture: Making A Greater Boston Region 

MAPC has launched a new civic process, called MetroFuture, to create an 
updated regional vision and growth strategy for metropolitan Boston. 
MetroFuture engages city and town governments, state agencies, non-profits, 
business, labor and academic groups in this planning process. The outcome 
will be a vision and growth strategy that puts the region on a sustainable 
path in terms of land use, economic, environmental and social issues. MAPC 
will need the support of a broad range of organizations in the region to help 
plan, fund and implement this new framework for addressing the challenges 
facing metropolitan Boston. 

The effort to create this new strategy was launched on October 29, 2003 at a 
Boston College Citizens Seminar. More than 400 citizens from a wide range of 
local and regional groups attended the event, and expressed their opinions on 
the region's resources and challenges as well as their own visions for the 
future. This input will be critical as we move to the next phase of this 
exciting multi-year project. Please visit the project website, 
www . metrofuture . org , for more information. 

North Suburban Planning Council (Burlington, Lynnfield, North Reading, 
Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester and Woburn) . 



-134- 



In 2004, the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) was involved in a wide 
range of activities from community development planning to transportation 
issues. MAPC completed Community Development Plans under Executive Order 418 
for Burlington, Reading and Woburn. As a follow-up to Executive Order 418, 
MAPC presented information on three state initiatives; the Commonwealth 
Capital Fund, the Priority Development Fund and the 4 OR Smart Growth Zoning 
initiative. MAPC also assisted Burlington, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, 
Wilmington, Winchester and Woburn with completing the Commonwealth Capital 
Fund applications. 

The subregion was briefed periodically on the MetroFuture project. The 
results of the survey taken at Burlington Truck Day and the November 19, 2004 
visioning event were tabulated and presented to the subregion at its January 
meeting . 

The major areas of concern in transportation planning were the annual review 
of the TIP and the UPWP and the start of Phase II of the North Suburban 
Transit Opportunities Study. 

The subregion was also kept apprised of the on-going review of the subregions 
that is taking place in conjunction with the MAPC strategic planning process. 
MAPC also made presentations to the subregion and to individual communities 
concerning the opportunity to apply for a Multi-Hazard Mitigation Planning 
grant . 

Middlesex Canal Commissioo 

This was a very busy year. The Middlesex Canal Association had four good 
programs. The first was on New Year's Day celebrating the 200th Anniversary 
of the canal officially opening (1803). Their charter stipulated that the 
project be finished in ten years - ending December 31 but the story goes that 
they had to set the clocks back as they raced to finish. No one seemed to 
mind as it was the greatest engineering project of its time - 27.3 miles of 
canal dug mostly by hand with shovel and pick axe. About 300 people came to 
celebrate with us . 

The winter meeting was a slide show by Fred Lawson, one of the original 
founders of the Association. Many of these slides had not been seen by us 
and we were able to compare the current landscape with that of 40 years ago. 
At the April Annual Meeting Tom Raphael, President of the Middlesex Canal 
Commission, gave a lecture/slide show on the Middlesex Turnpike, initially a 
toll road, and its relationship to the Middlesex Canal. At the fall meeting, 
Nolan Jones, President of the Middlesex Canal Association gave a lecture/ 
slide show on changes over the years to the remnants of the canal. 

There were annual walks along the canal this year: in Billerica in the fall 
and Winchester in the spring - associated with the Appalachian Mountain Club. 
These are well attended and enjoyed. 

The Middlesex Canal Commission, in conjunction with the Billerica Canal 
Commission, with permission from the Wilmington Board of Selectmen installed 
an excellent sign at the Shawsheen Aqueduct. It shows Payro ' s painting of a 
boat crossing the aqueduct. Now people will be able to see how the stone 
pillars were used. 

The Middlesex Canal Museum continues to hold a Spring Tea, Antique/Craft 
Shows and Rummage Sales as fundraisers. Please see our website for more 
information. Our museum is open from April to October on weekends from noon 
to 4:00 p.m. and by appointment. 



-135- 



The Commission continues to work with the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
to complete the National Historic Registry Designation. There will be 
meetings in all nine towns this year as the final input. 

The Commission has worked closely with the Boston Redevelopment Authority and 
the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority in an effort to have the Middlesex Canal 
memorialized on Canal Street - the Boston extension of the Middlesex Canal - 
when the project there comes for bid. We expect some decision this year. 

The Commission's Education Committee again had eight third-grade classes from 
the Woburn Street School to the Museum over a four-day period - two classes 
per day. The teachers there, especially Traci Benvenga, have been 
outstanding . 

There has been considerable time spent attending Planning Board and 
Conservation Commission meetings this year in an attempt to save as much of 
the canal as possible from destruction. Four separate areas: 911 Main 
Street, Olin's entrance on Main Street near the Town Park to install new 
wells in the Maple Meadow Aquifer, 157 Lake Street and Patches Pond are under 
threat. The Massachusetts Historical Commission has been very helpful as we 
try to save as much of the canal as we can. The Middlesex Canal is 
Wilmington's greatest historic treasure. 



We always welcome new members. Please visit our website: middlesexcanal .org 
for more information. 




-136- 



Inspector of Buildio: 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the Town of 
Wilmington Zoning By-law and for maintaining all related records. In addition, all 
administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Daniel Paret; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is Paul 
Raffi; the Wiring Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Toni La Rivee, Linda Reed and 
Wendy Martiniello make up the clerical staff, which is shared with the Board of 
Health. 



It is our goal to help people 


understand the regulations 


enforced by 


the 


Inspector 


of Buildings, how best to comply with 


those regulations 


and to provide assistance to 


residents and others who have 


questions about homes and 


property in 


the town. If 


you have any questions, please 


do not 


hesitate to 


come and see us . 










2002 




2003 




2004 


RESIDENTIAL 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


Single Family Dwellings 


48 


5,246,674 


61 


8, 285, 550 


51 


9,450,765 


Additions 


159 


5, 721, 729 


163 


6, 939, 661 


145 


6, 183, 860 


Remodeling 


143 


1 , 760 , 176 


141 


1,400,240 


151 


1 , 464 , 062 


Utility Buildings 


12 


211,400 


9 


103 , 914 


11 


167, 575 


Pools 


51 


406, 125 


46 


386,468 


47 


545, 916 


Miscellaneous 


50 


301, 059 


50 


285 , 955 


60 


619, 579 




463 


13, 647, 163 


470 


17 , 401 , 788 


465 


18,432, 657 


COMMERCIAL 














New Buildings 


2 


891, 000 


5 


6, 750, 000 


14 


3,400, 000 


Public Buildings 




















Additions 


6 


3,925,000 


2 


125, 000 


4 


1, 341, 000 


Fitups 


47 


8, 194, 272 


32 


3, 615, 942 


43 


12, 356, 198 


Utility Buildings 








2 


5, 800 








Signs 


12 


49, 003 


14 


42, 952 


21 


65, 295 


Miscellaneous 


17 


882, 766 


12 


1, 147, 768 


24 


1, 979, 750 




84 


27,589,204 


67 


11, 687,462 


106 


19, 142,243 


TOTAL 


547 


27,589,204 


537 


29, 089,250 


571 


37, 574, 900 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND 














SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 














Building Permits 


547 


142,449.00 


537 


152, 001 . 00 


571 


191, 460 . 00 


Wiring Permits 


682 


36, 629 . 00 


647 


25, 930.00 


680 


30, 385 .00 


Gas Permits 


244 


7, 111 . 00 


224 


5,775.00 


244 


7,425.00 


Plumbing Permits 


322 


12,245.00 


265 


9, 890 . 00 


313 


14, 605 . 00 


Cert, of Inspection 


29 


1,306.00 


36 


1, 455 . 00 


27 


1, 158 . 00 


Copies 




205 . 00 




176 .20 




89.40 


Court 

















Industrial Elec. Permits 


49 


7,200 . 00 


54 


7, 900 . 00 


59 


8,850 . 00 



1,824 $207,145,00 1,763 $203,127.20 1,894 253,972.40 



-137- 



Board of Appeals 



Case 1-2004 Jordan V. Ally Map 48 Parcel 45 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, front and side yard setback-proposing to remove 
existing 8 ' x8 ' sunroom and construct an 8'xl4' sunroom meeting the rear yard 
setback) for property located on 5 Morse Avenue. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 2A5cB-2004 Priscilla A. Mickle Map 43 Parcel 13A 

A. Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law 
that a proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling is within the front yard setback-proposing an addition meeting the 
setback requirements) 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 

B. A Special Permit for an Accessory Apartment for property located on 18 
Stone Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 3-2004 Henry 0. Silsbee, IV Map 31 Parcel 26 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling has insufficient front and side yard setbacks -proposing an addition 
meeting the rear yard setback) for property located on 11 Shawsheen Avenue. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 4-2004 Tom C. Taylor Map 34 Parcel 82 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, depth, width and front yard setback-proposing to 
demolish the existing dwelling and rebuilding a dwelling no closer to the 
front than the existing dwelling and meeting the side and rear yard setback 
requirements) for property located on 127 Grove Avenue. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



-138- 



Case 5-2004 



Kristina M. O'Connell 



Map 42 Parcel 41 



Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling is 14.8 feet from the front yard lot line-proposing an addition 
meeting all the setback requirements) for property located on 57 Clark 
Street . 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 6-2004 Michael & Cheryl Reed c/o R. Peterson Map 16 Parcel 47 

Seeking a determination by the Board under §6.1.2.2 of the Wilmington Zoning 
By-law to increase the nonconforming nature of the structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, width and depth and dwelling is within the front yard 
setbacks -proposing a second floor addition) for property located on 42 Marion 
Street. 

Granted - alteration would not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and 
would not be more detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 7A&B-2004 Francis & Janet Mullin c/o R. Peterson Map 96 Parcel 10 

A. Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law 
that a proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient frontage and width-proposing an addition meeting the setback 
requirements ) 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 

B. A Special Permit for an Accessory Apartment for property located on 22 
High Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 8A&B-2004 Michael Quigley c/o R. Peterson Map 34 Parcel 116B 

A. Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law 
that a proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling is 28.9 feet from the front yard lot line-proposing an addition 
meeting the setback requirements) . 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 

B. A Special Permit for an Accessory Apartment for property located on 36 
Burnap Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



-139- 



Case 9-2004 



John M. Koster c/o R. Peterson Map 41 Parcel 137B 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.1 
and 5.2.3 to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
area and depth for property located on 3 Naples Road. 

Granted - to construct a single feunily dwelling on a lot having 
insufficient area and depth. 



Case 10-2004 Patricia J. Dalton Map 51 Parcel 8 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient width, front and side yard setbacks -proposing an addition 
meeting the setback requirements) for property located on 114 Church Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 11-2004 Keith James Realty Trust Map 44 Parcel 17 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area and depth-proposing to demolish the existing dwelling 
and building a dwelling meeting the setback requirements) for property 
located on 1 Hobson Avenue . 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 12-2004 Steven G. McGinley Map 52 Parcel 55 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, width, front and side yard setbacks -proposing a 
detached garage meeting the setback requirements) for property located on 104 
Middlesex Avenue. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 13-2004 CardioTech Rlty Trust c/o D. Brown Map Rl Parcel 108B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6 Ground Water Protection 
District to produce medical -grade plastics for shipment to medical device 
manufacturers for property located on 229 Andover Street. 

Granted - with conditions of Site Plan Review and a memo from Michael 
Vivaldi dated May 3, 2004. 



-140- 



Case 14-2004 



Dennis Donahue 



Map 84 Parcel 62 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.2.2 of the Wilmington 
Zoning By-law to increase the nonconforming nature of the structure {existing 
lot has insufficient area, width, depth, front, side and rear yard setbacks- 
proposing a porch to be 5.5 feet closer to the front yard lot line than the 
existing dwelling) for property located on 55 McDonald Road. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 15-2004 Philip J. Enos Map 78 Parcel 17 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 
to construct a garage 10 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is 
required for property located on 25 Dadant Drive. 

Withdravm - without prejudice. 



Case 16-2004 Mark Filippi Map 60 Parcel 31 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, front yard setback on Wing Road and side yard setback- 
proposing an addition meeting the setback requirements) for property located 
on 563 Woburn Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 17-2004 Michael Tkachuk c/o M. Newhouse Esq. Map 54 Parcel 107 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area and depth-proposing to raze the existing structure and 
build a dwelling no closer to the lot lines than the existing dwelling) for 
property located on 18 Broad Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 18-2004 Robert P. Autenzio Jr. c/o R. Peterson Map 25 Parcel 4 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.1 to operate a retail 
store for property located at 911 Main Street. 

Granted - with conditions of Site Plan Review and the hours discussed. 



-141- 



Case 19-2004 



Robert P. Autenzio Jr. c/o R. Peterson Map 25 Parcel 4 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 to render impervious 
more than 15% or 2,500 square feet and provide for adequate recharge of 
groundwater for property located at 911 Main Street. 

Granted - with conditions of Site Plan Review and the hours discussed. 



Case 20-2004 Erik & Caryl Nansel Map 62 Parcel 41A 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling is within the front yard setback-proposing a second floor addition) 
for property located on 22 Lincoln Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 21-2004 Eric Murray c/o Cuoco & Cormier Eng. Map 35 Parcel 3 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located off of Benson Road, Ponderosa Road in Tewksbury. 

Granted - meets the criteria for a hcunmerhead lot. 



Case 22-2004 4"^" of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

To acquire a Special Permit for a carnival during the 4"^^ of July Celebration 
from June 29 through July 5, 2004, for property located at 159 Church Street. 

Granted 



Case 23-2004 Edward R. Barrasso, Jr. Map 83 Parcel 4 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, width, front and side yard setbacks -proposing an 
addition no closer to the sides than the existing dwelling) for property 
located on 91 Salem Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



-142- 



Case 24-2004 



David & Lisa Brabant 



Map 84 Parcel 54 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.2.2 of the Wilmington 
Zoning By-law to increase the nonconforming nature of the structure (existing 
lot has insufficient area, width, frontage, front and rear yard setbacks- 
proposing to remove the existing deck and building an addition closer to 
Bernstein Road but not exceeding 50% of the combined floor area of the 
existing dwelling) for property located on 54 McDonald Road. 

Granted - alteration would not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and 
would not be more detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 25-2004 Frank Botte Map 17 Parcel 14H 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 16 Roberts Road. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 26-2004 Keith P. DeAmbrose Map 87 Parcel 4H 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimesional Regulations Table II, §5.2.5 
for an inground pool to be 12.6 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet 
is required for property located on 10 Nelson Way. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 27-2004 Janet Coulouris Map 11 Parcel 38E 

Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing lot 
has insufficient area, width, depth, frontage, front, side and rear yard 
setbacks -proposing an addition meeting the setback requirements) for property 
located on 2 Boyle Street. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 28-2004 Marshall Farmington, LLC c/o R. Peterson Map Rl Parcel 111 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 to render impervious 
more than 15% or 2,500 square feet of the lot for property located on 235 
Andover Street. 

Granted - subject to Site Plan Review conditions. 



Case 29-2004 Marshall Farmington LLC c/o R. Peterson Map 87 Parcel 4H 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.4.3 for relief of the 
parking requirements for property located on 235 Andover Street. 

Granted - subject to Site Plan Review conditions. 



-143- 



Case 30-2004 



Christopher D. Lyman 



Map 92 Parcel 51A 



Seeking a determination under §6.1.2.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law that a 
proposed alteration to a nonconforming structure does not increase any 
portion of the nonconforming nature of the existing structure (existing 
dwelling has insufficient front yard setback-proposing a deck meeting the 
setback requirements) for property located on 8 Oakridge Circle. 

Finding - the proposed alteration does not increase any portion of the 
nonconforming nature of the structure and would not be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 31-2004 Michael Tkachuk c/o R. Peterson Map 96 Parcel 5 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 441 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 32-2004 James & Lynn Cheney Map 84 Parcel 9 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.2.2 of the Wilmington 
Zoning By-law to increase the nonconforming nature of the structure (existing 
lot has insufficient area, width, depth, front and rear yard setback) for 
property located on 12 Royal Street. 

Granted - alteration does not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and 
would not be more detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 33-2004 Joseph Ribas & Laura Brown Map 87 Parcel 13E 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 240 Woburn Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 34-2004 Joseph Ribas & Laura Brown Map 87 Parcel 13F 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 238 Woburn Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 35-2004 Paul & Laura Giordano Map 34 Parcel 76 

To acquire a Special Permit under §6.1.2.2 to increase a nonconforming 
structure (existing lot has insufficient area, width, depth, front and side 
yard setbacks -constructing a farmer's porch within the front yard setback) 
for property located on Grove Avenue and Winchell Road. 

Granted - addition will not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and will 
not be detrimental to the neighborhood. 



-144- 



Case 36-2004 



Michael P. Albanese 



Map 11 Parcel 38F 



To acquire a Special Permit under §6.1.2.2 to increase a nonconforming 
structure (existing lot has insufficient area, width, depth, front and rear 
yard setbacks-construct an addition 10 feet from the side yard setback when 
25 feet is required) for property located on 4 Boyle Street. 

Granted - addition will not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and will 
not be detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 37-2004 Janna Corsetti c/o R. Peterson Map 2 Parcel 9 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 22 Hillside Way, Lot 2. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 38-2004 Janna Corsetti c/o R. Peterson Map 2 Parcel 9 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 22 Hillside Way, Lot 3. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 39-2004 Michael Caples Map 40 Parcel 22A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 4A Parker Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 40-2004 SF Land Development c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 52 

To acquire a variance from §6.4.2.4 which prohibits a paved surface within 20 
feet of the sideline of the street or 10 feet of any other lot line for 
property located on 316 Lowell Street. 

Granted 



Case 41-2004 SF Land Development c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 52 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.6 proposed open space is 16.5% where 20% is 
required, existing site has 1% open space with a net increase of 15.5% for 
property located on 316 Lowell Street. 

Granted 



Case 42-2004 SF Land Development c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 52 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.6.1, 20-foot landscape buffer for property 
located on 316 Lowell Street. 

Granted 



-145- 



Case 43-2004 



SF Land Development c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 52 



To acquire a variance from §6.3.5.3 from the sign requirements (75.2 s.f. 
where 50 s.f. is allowed) for property located on 316 Lowell Street. 

Granted 



Case 44-2004 SF Land Development c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 52 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.5 to construct a new building 23 feet and 24 
feet from the setbacks when 50 feet is required for property located on 316 
Lowell Street. 

Granted 



Case 46-2004 David & Rebecca Maison Map 81 Parcel 10 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 32 Shady Lane Drive. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 47-2004 Sasso Construction Co., Inc. Map Rl Parcel 110 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 to increase the 
impervious area to 29.5% for property located on 231 Andover Street. 

Granted - subject to Site Plan Review conditions. 



Case 48-2004 James & Maria Luongo Map R3 Parcel 008B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to construct a second 
floor addition and farmer's porch closer to the front lot line than the 
existing nonconforming dwelling for property located on 415 Andover Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 49-2004 James M. Russo Map 58 Parcel 16 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.2.2 to increase the size 
of an existing dormer on the front and construct a matching dormer to the 
rear of the dwelling for property located on 616 Woburn Street. 

Granted - does not exceed 50% of the combined floor area and is not more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 50-2004 AT&T Wireless Service Map 31 Parcel 59 

To amend a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8.4.4 to add two 2 -foot 
diameter microwave dish antennas to an existing installation for property 
located on Nassau Avenue. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



-146- 



Case 51-2004 



Amerada Hess Corp c/o R. Peterson Map 43 Parcel 4B 



To acquire a variance from §6.4.2.4 which prohibits a paved surface within 20 
feet of the sideline of a street or 10 feet from any other lot line for 
property located on 273 Main Street. 

Granted 



Case 52-2004 Amerada Hess Corp c/o R. Peterson Map 43 Parcel 4B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.2.2 to change a 
nonconforming use by relocating the existing building which is conforming and 
constructing a new building within the side yard setbacks for property 
located on 273 Main Street. 

Granted 



Case 53-2004 Amerada Hess Corp c/o R. Peterson Map 43 Parcel 4B 

To acquire a variance from §5.2.5 for a building to be constructed 19 feet 
from the side and 7.5 feet from the rear yard setbacks when 20 feet is 
required for property located on 273 Main Street. 

Granted 



Case 54-2004 Arthur D. Johnson III Map 44 Parcel 70 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 for an addition, 
larger second level and farmer's porch for property located on 69 Taplin 
Avenue . 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 55-2004 Scott Bruce Map 52 Parcel 25 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 for a farmer's porch 
to be 30 feet from the front yard lot line when 40 feet is required for 
property located on 103 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - does not exceed 50% of the combined floor area or be more 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Case 56-2004 

To acquire a Finding in a 
nonconforming dwelling for 

Granted - no more detrimen 



Joseph P. Gibbons 

ccordance with §6.1.2.1 
property located on 58 

tal to the neighborhood 



Map 52 Parcel 44 

for an addition to a 
Clark Street. 

than the existing dwelling. 



Case 57-2004 Joseph P. Gibbons Map 52 Parcel 44 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 58 Clark Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



-147- 



Case 58-2004 



Gary B. DePalma 



Map 7 Parcel 85 



To acquire a Finding in accordance with §6.1.2.1 for an addition to the front 
of a nonconforming dwelling for property located on 1 Taft Road. 

Granted - no more nonconforming than the existing dwelling or detrimental 
to the neighborhood. 



Case 59-2004 Floradale Ave Rlty Trust c/o D. Brown Map 29 Parcel IIU 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Towpath Drive . 

Withdrawn - without prejudice 



Case 60-2004 Raychel Greenwald Map 59 Parcel 3 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 15 West Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 61-2004 Michael & Nadine Peroni Map 36 Parcel 129 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 for a proposed porch, 
deck and basement entrance to an existing nonconforming structure, lot has 
insufficient area, width and front yard setback for property located on 95 
Nichols Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 62-2004 Michael & Robin VonKahle Map 34 Parcel 77 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 for a proposed deck 
to an existing nonconforming structure, dwelling has insufficient front and 
side yard setback for property located on 6 Winchell Road. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 63-2004 Kevin O'Grady Map 23 Parcel 107 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 9 Harold Avenue. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 64-2004 Wm. Wolfe c/o R. Peterson Map 88 Parcel 17 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §5.3.4 for a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 3 9 High Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



-148- 



Case 65-2004 David Hale Map 16 Parcel 7 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory- 
Apartment addition for property located on 2 Marion Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 66-2004 Clarence Spinazola Trust c/o R. Buckley Map 25 Parcel 2 

To appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings for property located on 
923 Main Street. 

Upheld - decision of the Inspector of Buildings. 



Case 67-2004 Mass Env. Assoc. c/o Barry Fogel Map 25 Parcel 2 

To appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings for property located on 
923 Main Street. 

Upheld - decision of the Inspector of Buildings. 



Case 68-2004 Lucci Realty Trust Map 58 Parcel 30 

To acquire a variance from §6.1.6.4 for a proposed sign to be larger than 
required for property located on 230 Lowell Street. 

Granted. 



Case 69-2004 Peter Tympanick Map 22 Parcel 18F 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 for a proposed 
farmer's porch and addition within the front and side yard setbacks for 
property located on 162 Lake Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 70-2004 Cumberland Farms Inc. Map 44 Parcel 1 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1 to change/extend the pre- 
existing nonconforming use for property located on 205 Main Street. 

Granted - with the conditions of DPW and that sentence three would be 
presented to Mass Highway. 



Case 71-2 004 Cumberland Farms Inc. Map 44 Parcel 1 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.8 Groundwater Protection 
District for property located on 205 Main Street. 

Granted - with the conditions of DPW and that sentence three would be 
presented to Mass Highway. 



-149- 



Case 72-2004 



Kameliya A. Shakaryan 



Map 84 Parcel 115 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to enclose an 
existing deck for property located on 84 Salem Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 73-2004 James T. McGowan Map 55 Parcel 160 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 
for an addition to be 10.5 feet from the side yard setback when 15 feet is 
required for property located on 18 Fairfield Road. 

Granted - no closer than 10.5 feet from the side yard lot line because of 
the unique circiimstances of the existing gravel road. 



Case 74-2004 J.J.N.C. Realty Trust Map 67 Parcel 36 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to demolish the 
existing dwelling and rebuild no closer to the front setback than the 
existing dwelling for property located on 3 Lee Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 75-2004 David Newhouse, Jr. Map 73 Parcel 30 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to extend an enclosed 
porch to be no closer to the side yard lot line than the existing dwelling 
for property located on 19 Westdale Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 76-2004 Paul Litchfield Map 6 Parcel 100 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to demolish an 
existing nonconforming dwelling and rebuilding a dwelling on a lot having 
insufficient area, front and side yard setback for property located on 295 
Burlington Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 77-2004 Jeff Johnston Map 51 Parcel 21&21A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to construct an 
addition to a nonconforming dwelling for property located on 15 Thurston 
Avenue . 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 78-2004 David T. Landers Map 52 Parcel 9 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 88 Clark Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



-150- 



Case 79-2004 



Marco & Virginia Madeira 



Map 73 Parcel 40 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to construct a second 
floor addition to a nonconforming dwelling for property located on 6 Westdale 
Avenue . 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 80-2004 Barbara Doucette c/o Quality Additions Map 73 Parcel 43 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to construct a garage 
and addition no closer to the front than the existing dwelling for property 
located on 14 Westdale Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 81-2004 John R. Forrest Map 89 Parcel 006A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.15 for an Auto Repair 
Shop for property located on 3 62 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - meets criteria of the By-law. 



Case 82-2004 David McCue Map 60 Parcel 32 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to construct an 
addition no closer to the side yard lot line than the existing dwelling for 
property located on 2 Wing Road. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 83-2004 Rex & Sheryl Deniso Map 55 Parcel 102 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 
for an addition 23 feet from the front yard lot line on Fairfield Road when 
30 feet is required for property located on 2 Everett Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 84-2004 Steven & Charles Baker Map 19 Parcel 48 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 to construct an Accessory 
Apartment addition for property located on 194 Taft Road. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 85-2004 Arrow Paper Corp. c/o R. Peterson Map Rl Parcel 18C,D, 204 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.6.7.7 to render more than 
15%, or 2,500 square feet impervious for property located on 25 Upton Drive, 
228-230 Andover Street. 

Granted 



-151- 



Coostable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts. 

Presidential Primary February 12,2004 

Annual Town Meeting and Town Election March 17, 2004 

State Primary August 18, 2004 

State Election October 19, 2004 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - MARCH 2, 2004 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections to vote at West Intermediate School - Precincts 1 and 2, Wildwood 
Street School - Precincts 3 and 4 and Town Hall - 121 Glen Road - Precincts 5 
and 6 on Tuesday, the second day of March, 2004 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 
for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of 
political parties for the following officers: 

Presidential Preference For the Commonwealth 

State Committee Man 1^'^ Essex & Middlesex Senatorial District 

State Committee Woman 1^''^ Essex & Middlesex Senatorial District 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee 
Members of the Republican Town Committee 
Members of the Libertarian Town Committee 
Members of the Green Rainbow Town Committee 



Democratic Party Republican Party 



Presidential Preference 


Presidential Preference 


Richard Gephardt 


6 


George W. Bush 


310 


Joseph Lieberman 


18 


No Preference 


16 


Wesley K. Clark 


14 


Others 





Howard Dean 


36 


Blanks 


. 13 


Carol Moseley Braun 


1 


Total 


339 


John Edwards 


472 






Dennis J. Kucinich 


30 


State Committee Man 




John F. Kerry 


1,490 


Dale C . Jenkins , Jr . 


146 


Lydon H. Larouche, Jr . 


1 


John N . Racho 


130 


Al Sharpton 


19 


Blanks 


63 


No Preference 


17 


Total 


339 


Blanks 


7 






Total 


2, 111 






State Committee Man 




State Committee Woman 


1^*^ Essex & Middlesex 




1^*^ Essex & Middlesex 




Andrew F. Armata 


1, 310 


Christina A. Bain 


230 


Daniel J. Lauzon 


168 


Blanks 


109 


Blanks 


633 


Total 


339 


Total 


2 , 111 







-152- 



state Committee Woman 




Town Committee 




Kathleen A. Pasquina 


1, 180 






Others 


1 


Melissa K. Forte 


112 


Blanks 


930 


William K. Forte 


111 


Total 


2 , 111 


Maureen E . Kuhn 


110 






Eleanor M. Martin 


115 






Michael E. Kuhn 


111 






John M. Walsh 


131 


Town Committee 




John P. Goggin 


116 


Daniel C. Wandell,Jr. 


577 


Catherine Goggin 


109 


George W. Hooper 


497 


William G. Hooper 


13 9 


Alice M. Hooper 


449 


Robert DiPasquale 


146 


Richard J. Pedi 


361 


M. Mattaliano 


112 


Jay J. Donovan 


432 


Michael Hutchison 


108 


Nancy J. Steen 


487 


Jean M. Hutchison 


110 


Robert J. Ford 


359 


Daniel Ballou 


5 


Barry J. Mulholland 


445 






Lorraine A. Casey 


472 






Anna M. Visconti 


523 






Americo M. Enos 


403 






Dwight F. Maxwell 


373 






James R. Miceli 


1, 007 






Karen M. Armata 


465 






Andrew J. Armata 


466 






Robert J. Cain 


526 






William J. Dowd 


351 






Michael R. Baker 


377 






James F. Banda 


589 






Lauren J. Pedi 


382 






Michael J. Bielecki 


388 






Green -Rainbow 




Libertarian 




Presidential Pref erencePresidential Preference 






Kent Mesplay 





Jeffrey Diket 





Lorna Salzman 





Ruben Perez 


1 


Paul Glover 





Aaron Russo 





David Cobb 





Michael Badnarik 





No Preference 





Gary Nolan 


4 


Blanks 





No Preference 





Total 





Blanks 









Total 


5 


State Committee Man 




State Committee Man 




No Candidate 




No Candidate 




State Committee Woman 




State Committee Woman 


No Candidate 




No Candidate 




Town Committee 




Town Committee 




No Candidates 




No Candidates 





The polls were opened at 7:00 p.m. by the Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at 
the Town Hall (Precincts 5 & 6) , Barbara Buck at the West Intermediate School 
(Precincts 1 & 2 ) , and Carolyn M. Kenney, Assistant Town Clerk at the 
Wildwood Street School (Precincts 3 & 4 ) and were closed at 8:00 p.m. A 
total of 2,455 residents voted, Democrats - 2,111, Republicans - 339, 
Libertarian Party - 5 and Green-Rainbow Party - 0. 17% of our 14,372 
registered voters came to the polls. 



-153 - 



T ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

APRIL 17, 2004 
ACTION TAKEN 



TO: 



CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



ARTICLE 1 . To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices to wit: Two Selectmen for the term of Three Years; 
Three Members of the School Committee for the term of Three Years; One Member 
of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of Five Years; and One Member of 
the Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee for the term of 
three years . 



You are also hereby further 
required and directed to notify and 
warn the said inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington who are 
qualified to vote on elections and 
town affairs therein to assemble 
subsequently and meet in the Town 
Meeting at the High School 
Gymnasium, Church Street, in said 
Town of Wilmington, on Saturday the 
twenty-forth day of April, A.D. 
2004 at 

10:30 a.m., then and there to act 
on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above 
Warrant, the election was opened by 
the Town Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon, at the Town Hall, Board of Registrars 
Member, Barbara Buck, at the West Intermediate School and the Assistant Town 
Clerk, Carolyn M. Kenney, at the Wildwood School. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could examine them before the polls were opened. The checkers 
were prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and 
everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 




Retiring Selectman Bob Palmer presents 
Wilmington's longest serving selectman, 
Bob Cain, with a token of appreciation. 



The results were as follows: 



SELECTMEN for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Suzanne Sullivan 60 Lawrence Street 1,772 

Michael Newhouse 6 Beverly Avenue 1,848 

Karl I. Sagal 7 Lawrence Court 516 

Daniel E. Woodbury 20 Central Street 750 

Ann L. Yurek 44 8 Shawsheen Avenue 894 

Blanks 778 

Total 6,558 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for three) 

Joan M. Duffy 10 Treasure Hill Road 1,776 

Daniel M. Ardito 15 Treasure Hill Road 1,311 

Margaret A. Kane 40 Hanover Street 1,723 

Blanks 5, 027 

Total 9,837 



-154- 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for five years (vote for one) 

John Goggin 28 Indian Road 1,894 

Blanks 1,385 

Total 3,279 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL -TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years 

Robert G. Peterson 18 Stonehedge Drive 2,336 

Blanks 943 

Total 3,279 

Question #1 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 2004 
entitled "An act providing for a special election to fill a 
vacancy on the board of selectmen in the town of Wilmington" be 
accepted . 

Yes 1,879 
No 3 81 

Blanks 1, 019 

Total 3,279 

The results of this election were ready at 9:45 p.m. and the elected officers 
present were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by Town Clerk 
Kathleen M. Scanlon. The total number of votes cast was 3,279, which 
included 222 absentee ballots. Wilmington now has 14,478 registered voters 
and 24% voted in this election. 



TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 21 
TH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



With a quorum present at 10:45 a.m. (150) James Stewart, Town Moderator, 
opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. He then read the names of 
departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year, also Town Meeting paused in tribute to our servicemen. 
A moment of silence was observed. He then introduced our newly elected and 
re-elected town officials and thanked the previous office holders. 

The Moderator began to read the warrant and was interrupted by Selectman 
Michael V. McCoy "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of 
the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number." 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2 . To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Town 
Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move to take no action." Motion seconded and 
so voted. 

ARTICLE 3 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the 
article not be adopted." Motion seconded and so voted. 



-155- 



ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 

Treasurer/Collector , with the approval of the Selectmen, to enter into an 
agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2005 and for a term not to 
exceed three years, which will permit the Town of Wilmington to maintain 
funds on deposit with such institutions in return for said institutions 
providing banking services; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Treasurer/Collector, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be hereby authorized to enter into an 
agreement under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2005 and for a 
term not to exceed three years, which will permit the Town of 
Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such institutions in 
return for said institutions providing banking services." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5 . To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several Town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by John F. Doherty, III, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee, "I move that the several and respective sums as 
recommended and presented by the Finance Committee be raised from 
the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenue of the Town, or by 
transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purpose 
set forth in Article #5, each department's budget to be taken up 
and voted on in the order they appear, subject to amendment and 
each department's budget not open for reconsideration until the 
entire budget is voted." Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT Voted 

Selectmen - Legislative 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Selectmen - Elections 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Registrars of Voters 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Finance Committee 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



$ 3,840 
14, 050 
17, 890 



23 , 067 
4, 850 
27, 917 



1, 825 
5,200 
7, 025 



1,260 
7 , 695 
8, 955 



-156- 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Treasurer /Col lector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Amt. Cert. Tax Title 
Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Appraisals & Inventories 
ATB Costs 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Town Counsel 

Legal Services 

Permanent Building Committee 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

PUBLIC SAFETY 
Police 

Salary - Chief 

Salary - Deputy Chief 

Salary - Lieutenants 

Salary - Sergeants 

Salary - Patrolmen 

Salary - Clerical 

Salary - Part Time 

Salary - Overtime 

Salary - Paid Holidays 

Salary - Specialists 

Salary - Night Differential 

Salary - Incentive 

Sick Leave Buyback 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



109, 166 
279, 031 
66, 388 
6,000 
460, 585 



79, 896 
185, 874 
2, 510 
268,280 



67, 224 
127, 812 
23,775 
24, 000 

q 

242 , 811 



66, 916 
94, 343 
2 , 360 
163 , 619 



83, 914 
75, 722 
36, 980 
31, 700 
25, 000 
663 
253 , 979 



150, 000 



400 
50 
450 

1. 601. 511 



81, 302 
78, 052 
130, 768 
336, 645 
1, 586,586 
75 , 261 


304 , 880 
94 , 908 
12 , 500 
43 , 056 

310, 565 
18, 224 

193 , 300 
13 , 500 
3, 279, 547 



157- 



Fire 

Salary- 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 
Salary 



Chief 

Deputy Chief 
Lieutenants 
Privates 
Clerk 
Part Time 
Overtime 
Paid Holidays 
EMT & Incentive Pay 
Fire Alarm 
Sick Leave Buyback 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Public Safety Central Dispatch 
Personnel Services 
Contractual Services 
Materials & Supplies 
Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Animal Control 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Personnel Services 
Superintendent 
Engineer - Full Time 
Engineer - Part Time 
Highway - Full Time 
Highway - Overtime 
Highway - Part Time 
Highway - Seasonal 
Stream Maintenance - Seasonal 
Tree - Full Time 
Tree - Overtime 
Parks/Grounds - Full Time 
Parks/Grounds - Overtime 
Cemetery - Full Time 
Cemetery - Overtime 
Snow & Ice - Ex. Help/0. T. 
Total 

Contractual Services 
Engineer 

Engineer - Training & Conference 
Highway 

Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 
Highway - Training & Conference 
Tree 

Parks /Grounds 
Cemetery 

Road Machinery - Repair 

Public Street Lights 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 

Snow & Ice - Repairs 

Snow Sc Ice - Misc. Services 

Total 

-158- 



98, 322 
74 , 926 
319, 961 
1, 552, 223 
42, 990 
14 , 131 
293 , 985 
108, 135 
11, 225 
16, 000 
21, 355 
104 , 320 



2 , 657 , 573 



433 , 977 
12 , 500 
4 , 500 



450, 977 



30,836 
3 , 575 
34,411 

6 , 422 . 508 



88, 062 
194 , 271 
7,200 
998, 613 
56, 400 
12 , 220 
14 , 880 
16, 740 
149, 289 
6, 180 
292, 051 
17, 400 
133, 225 
9, 570 
151, 780 
2, 147, 881 

3 , 200 

2 , 000 
68,200 
96, 400 

3 , 100 

3 , 000 
24 , 000 

4 , 100 
68, 000 

206, 500 
992 , 800 
16, 245 
125, 000 
1, 612, 545 



Materials & Supplies 

Engineer 3,500 

Highway 39,000 

Highway - Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 77,000 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 95,810 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 67,120 

Stream Maintenance - Expenses 1,000 

Tree 6,395 

Parks/Grounds 17,900 

Cemetery 13,650 

Drainage Projects 83,000 

Snow Sc Ice - Sand & Salt 101,320 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 4,000 

Total 509,695 

Furnishings & Equipment 40,650 

Total 4.310.771 

SEWER 

Personnel Services 65,096 

Maintenance & Operations 113 ,370 

Total 178,466 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 4 .489.237 

Article 5A . Motion by John F. Doherty, III, "I move that the sum of 
$4,489,237 be appropriated for the Department of Public Works; and to 
meet this appropriation $35 , 000 is to be transferred from sale of 
Cemetery Lots Account and the sum of $ 15 , 000 is to be transferred from 
Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be applied to line 
item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of 
$4,439,237 be raised from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the town. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Board of Health 

Salary - Director 68,970 

Other Salaries 153,722 

Expenses 10,285 

Mental Health 31,621 

Furnishings & Equip. 

Total 264,598 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries 5,040 

Expenses 100 

Total 5,140 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 71,944 

Other Salaries 164,000 

Expenses 15 , 175 

Furnishings & Equipment 1 < 310 

Total 252,429 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 66,199 

Other Salaries 98,040 

Expenses 3,695 

Furnishings & Equipment 750 

Total 167,684 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 689. 851 



-159- 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



Salary - Superintendent 98,322 

Other Salaries 1,916,282 

Overtime 4 5,3 80 

Part Time - Seasonal 14,880 

Heating Fuel 400,000 

Electricity 145,000 

Utilities 97,000 

Expenses 367,785 

Furnishings & Equipment 6,500 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 3 . 091. 149 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 7,884 

Expenses 2,050 

Assistance - Veterans 11, OOP 

Total 20,934 

Library 

Salary - Director 70,384 

Other Salaries 524,200 

Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 126,739 

Expenses 32,24 9 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 753,572 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 53,627 

Other - Salaries 45,512 

Expenses 5,600 

Furnishings & Equipment 769 

Total 105,508 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 55,493 

Other Salaries 77,826 

Expenses 3 8,654 

Total 171,973 

Historical Commission 

Salaries 23,750 

Expenses 4,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 27,750 

Commission on Disabilities 

Salaries 200 

Expenses 300 

Total 500 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 1. 080, 237 

SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 24,654,000 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District 3 , 065 , 229 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 27 . 719. 229 



-160- 



MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 3,391,025 

Public Safety 1,073,300 

Government 

Sewer 207 , 000 

Water 
Interest on Anticipation Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Misc. Debt 129, 826 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 4 , 801, 151 

ARTICLE 5B. Motion by John F. Doherty, III, "I move that the sum 
of $24 , 654 ,000 be appropriated to the Wilmington School 
Department to be expended under the supervision of the Wilmington 
School Committee and, to meet the appropriation, $ 800,000 be 
transferred from Available Funds - Free Cash and that the 
remaining balance of $ 23,854,000 be raised from the FY-05 tax 
levy and other general revenues of the Town." Motion seconded 
and so voted. 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance 632,400 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 5,296,000 

Veteran's Retirement 13,399 

Employee Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 40,000 

Medicare Employer's Contribution 380,000 

Salary Adjust. & Additional Costs 151,000 

Local Trans . /Training Conferences 5,000 

Out-of-state Travel 1,500 

Computer Maintenance & Expenses 65,000 

Records Storage 

Annual Audit 20,000 

Ambulance Billing 25,000 

Town Report 12,000 

Professional & Technical Services 90,000 

Reserve Fund 200,000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 6,931,799 

STATUTORY CHARGES 

Current Year Overlay 700,000 

Retirement Contributions 2,215,979 

Offset Items 42,385 

Special Education 

Mass Bay Transportation Authority 416,871 

MAPC (Ch 688 of 1963) 5,675 

RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 12,440 

Metro Air Pollution Control District 5,921 

Mosquito Control Program 38,825 

M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 1,845,448 

Criminal Justice Training 2,300 

School Choice 4,006 

Charter Schools 7,084 

Essex County Tech Institute 9> 225 

TOTAL STATUTORY CHARGES 5,306,159 



-161- 



ARTICLE 5C . Motion by John F. Doherty, III, "I move that the sum 
of $3 , 065 , 229 be appropriated for purposes of the Shawsheen 
Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District, and to 
meet this appropriation, $ 200 , OOP be transferred from Available 
Funds - Free Cash and that the remaining balance of $ 2,865,229 be 
raised from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues of the 
Town." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 5D . Motion by John F. Doherty, III, "I move that the sum 
of $ 4,801,151 be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest, and 
to meet this appropriation $ 130,894 be transferred from Available 
Funds - Free Cash and be applied to the line item Maturing Debt 
and Interest, Schools and that the sum of $ 268,500 be raised by 
transfer from Available Funds - Free Cash and be applied to the 
line item Maturing Debt and Interest, Public Safety, and that the 
balance of $ 4,401, 757 be raised from the FY-05 tax levy and other 
general revenues of the Town." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 5E . Motion by John F. Doherty, III, "I move that the sum 
of $ 6,931,799 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve of 
which the sum of $ 74 ,233 be transferred from Water Department 
Available Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - 
Insurance Account; and that the sum of $ 292 , 056 be transferred 
from Water Department Available Funds and that the sum of 
$ 300 , OOP be transferred from Available Funds - Free Cash, the 
total of which $ 592 , 056 be applied to the Unclassified and 
Reserve - Employee Life and Health Insurance Account; and that 
the sum of $ 8 , 664 be transferred from Water Department Available 
Funds and be applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Medicare 
Employee's Contribution Account; and that the remaining balance 
of $ 6,256,846 be raised from the FY-05 tax levy and other general 
revenues of the Town." Motion seconded and so voted. 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 29, 107 . 443 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including 
but not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or 
turn in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof: 

(a) Police Department 

Purchase of four (4) replacement police cruisers. 

Motion by Raymond N. Lepore, "I move that $96 , 4P0 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 05 tax levy and other general revenues of 
the Town, to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of four 
(4) replacement police cruisers for the Police Department, and 
further the sale, trade in and other disposition, if any, of said 
replaced vehicles is hereby authorized." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $96 , 4P0 . 

(b) Animal Control 

Purchase of one (1) minivan. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, "I move that $ 16,500 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the Town, to be spent by the Town Manager, for the purchase of 
one (1) minivan for the use of the Animal Control Officer, and 
further the sale, trade in, if any, or other disposition, of said 
replaced vehicle is hereby authorized." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 16,500. 



-162- 



(c) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement one -ton dump truck. 

Motion by Frank J. West, "I move that $50 , OOP be raised and 
appropriated from the FY- 05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the Town, to be spent by the Town Manager, for the purchase of 
one (1) replacement one -ton dump truck for the Department of 
Public Works, and further the sale, trade in, or other 
disposition, if any, of said replaced vehicle is hereby 
authorized." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted, $50 , 000 . 

(d) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement six-wheel dump truck. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that $ 90 , 000 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the Town, to be spent by the Town Manager, for the purchase of 
one (1) replacement six-wheel dump truck for the Department of 
Public Works, and further the sale, trade in, if any, or other 
disposition, of said replaced vehicle is hereby authorized." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $90,000 . 

(e) School Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement handicapped accessible minibus and one 
(1) minivan. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the sum of $ 64 , 500 be raised 
and appropriated from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues of 
the Town to be spent by the Town Manager for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement handicapped accessible minibus and one (1) minivan for the 
School Department, and further the sale, trade in, if any, or other 
disposition of said replaced vehicles is hereby authorized." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 64,500 . 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds, or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money for the reconstruction of the high school track at Alumni Field; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Raymond N. Lepore, "I move that $ 120,000 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the Town to be spent by the Town Manager to reconstruct the 
track surface at Alumni Field at Wilmington High School." 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so 
voted, $120, OOP . 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money to purchase two 3PP gallon gas fired hot water boilers to replace the 
hot water tank at the high school; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, "I move that $ 50,000 be 
transferred from Available Funds - Free Cash to be spent by the 
Town Manager to purchase two 300 gallon gas fired hot water 
boilers to replace the hot water tank at the high school." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $50, OOP . 



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ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money for the replacement of approximately 4,100 square feet of roof area at 
the Woburn Street School; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Frank J. West, "I move that $ 50,000 be transferred from 
Available Funds - Free Cash to be spent by the Town Manager for 
the replacement of approximately 4,100 square feet of roof area 
at the Woburn Street School." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $50,000. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money to complete the interior painting of the North Intermediate School; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that $ 48,000 be raised and 
appropriated from the FY-05 tax levy and other general revenues 
of the Town to be spent by the Town Manager to complete the 
interior painting of the North Intermediate School." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$48,000 . 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money for the installation of ductless split air conditioning units at 
Wilmington Memorial Library to replace the existing air cooling system; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that $ 124 ,000 be transferred 
from Available Funds - Free Cash to be spent by the Town Manager 
for the installation of ductless split air conditioning units at 
Wilmington Memorial Library to replace the existing air cooling 
system." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $124 , 000 . 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of approximately 1,000 square yards 
of carpet tiles to replace the carpet at the Wilmington Memorial Library; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Raymond N. Lepore, "I move that $ 44,000 be transferred from 
Available Funds - Free Cash to be spent by the Town Manager for the 
purchase and installation of approximately 1,000 square yards of carpet 
tiles to replace the carpet at the Wilmington Memorial Library." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 44 , 000 . 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of 
money for the replacement of the roof at Town Hall; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 



Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, "I move that $ 225,000 be transferred 
from Available Funds - Capital Stabilization Fund to be spent by the 
Town Manager for the replacement of the roof at Town Hall." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 225,000 



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ARTICLE 14 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer 
from available funds, borrow pursuant to any applicable statute or accept 
federal and/or state reimbursement, a sum of money for the purchase of 
optical scan voting machines and voting booths in accordance with the Help 
America Vote Act; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Frank J. West, "I move that $ 24 , 300 be transferred and 
appropriated from the FY- 05 tax levy and other general revenues of the 
Town to be spent by the Town Clerk with the approval of the Town 
Manager for the purchase of optical scan voting machines and voting 
booths in accordance with the Help America Vote Act." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 24 , 300 . 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the Fiscal Year 2 004 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of 
various town departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira "I move that $ 520 , OOP be transferred from 
the following Fiscal Year 2004 accounts: 

Treasurer/Collector - Other Salaries, $9,000; Board of Assessors - 
Other Salaries - $13,000; Police, Salary - Part Time; $10,400; Police 
Salary - Overtime, $20,000; Fire, Salary - Fire Alarm - $10,000; Public 
Safety Central Dispatch - Personnel Services $50,000; Public Works, 
Personnel Services - Stream Maintenance - Seasonal, $12,000; Public 
Works, Contractual Services - Public Street Lights, $25,000; Public 
Works - Contractual Services, Snow and Ice, Miscellaneous Services, 
$60,000; Planning and Conservation, Other Salaries, $12,000; Public 
Buildings - Other Salaries, $70,000; Public Buildings - Electricity, 
$35,000; Library - Other Salaries, $5,000; Recreation - Salary - 
Director, $2,000; Recreation - Other Salaries, $12,000; Maturing Debt & 
Interest, Interest on Anticipation Notes and Authorization Fees and 
Miscellaneous Debt, $7,500; Unclassified & Reserve - Insurance, 
$110,000; Medicate Employer's Contribution; $50,000, Local 
Transportation/Training Conf . , $2,900; Annual Audit, $4,200. 

Total $520, 000 

to the following Fiscal Year 2004 accounts: 

Public Buildings 
Heating Fuel 110,000 
Utilities 10,000 

Unclassified and Reserve 

Employee Health and Life Insurance 250,000 
Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs 150 , 000 

$ 520,000 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 520, OOP . 

Random selection of Articles began at Article 16. 

ARTICLE 16 . (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen work 
opportunities for services rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's 
Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that $ 1P , OOP be transferred and 
appropriated from the FY- 05 tax levy and other general revenues of the 
Town to be spent by the Town Manager for the purpose of providing 
senior citizen work opportunities for services rendered to the Town in 
accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$10, 000. 



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ARTICLE 17. (drawn as #25) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee which shall arrange 
and have charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that $5,000 be raised and 
appropriated for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 5, 000 ■ 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn as #28) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $2,250) for the purpose of 
renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 4 of the General Laws 
as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Raymond N. Lepore, "I move that $ 750.00 each (a total of 
$2,250 ) be raised and appropriated from the FY- 05 tax levy and other 
general revenues of the town to be spent by the Town Manager for the 
purpose of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of 
the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion." 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 2,250 . 

ARTICLE 19 . (drawn as #14) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
44, Section 53E M for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and to authorize the 
Town Manager to expend such funds and further to establish a spending limit 
for said account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, "I move that the Compost Bin Revolving 
Fund as established by Article 3 of the Special Town Meeting of 
December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E M 
for a Compost Bin Recycling Program be hereby authorized to continue 
with the spending source, spending authority and spending purposes as 
set forth in Article 3 of the December 4, 1995 Special Town Meeting and 
further the FY-05 spending limit of $ 4,500 is hereby established." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 4 , 500 ■ 



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ARTICLE 20 . (drawn as #24) To see if the town will vote to accept as a 
public way the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and laid out by the Selectman (Massachusetts General Laws Ch. 41 and 
Ch. 82 as amended) and shown on certain Definitive Subdivision plans approved 
in accordance with "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land 
in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at 
the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds (M.N.R.D) as Plan Book 143, Page 323, 
PI an Book 204, Page 127 and Plan Book 204, Page 97 copies of which are on 
file in the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Selectman to 
acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain such land, slope and drainage or 
other easements as may be necessary to affect the purpose of this Article, 
and further to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money to be spent by the 
Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of 
recording said ways and for the payment of any damages from the fee taking of 
land and easements or other related costs therefore: 

a. Seneca Lane - Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Seneca Lane 
at the lot corner of lot number 18 and lot number 19 as shown on the 
plan entitled "Street Layout and Acceptance Plan, Seneca Lane, 
Wilmington, Mass.", prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc., dated August 
19, 2002; thence running S 63°-32'- 05" E for a distance of one hundred 
sixty-three and ninety-six hundredths (163.96') feet to a stone bound; 
thence running in a northeasterly direction along a curve to the left a 
radius of two hundred (200.00') feet, a distance of one hundred thirty 
and seventy-five hundredths (130.75') feet to a stone bound; thence 
running again in a northeasterly direction along a curve to the left a 
radius of fifty (50.00') feet, a distance of sixty-seven and eighty- 
three hundredths (67.83') feet to a stone bound; thence running in a 
northeasterly direction along a curve to the right having a radius of 
eighty (80.00') feet, a distance of three hundred ninety-eight and 
seventy-four hundredths (398.74') feet along the cul-de-sac of Seneca 
Lane to a stone bound; thence running in a southwesterly direction 
along a curve to the left having a radius of fifty (50.00') feet, a 
distance of thirty-five and forty-four hundredths (35.44') feet to a 
stone bound; thence running in a southwesterly direction along a curve 
to the right having a radius of two hundred fifty (250.00') feet, a 
distance of two hundred nineteen and seventeen hundredths (219.17') 
feet to a stone bound; thence running N 63°-32'- 05" W for a distance 
of one hundred sixty- three and ninety six hundredths (163.96') feet to 
a stone bound; thence running N 26°-27'-55" E for a distance of fifty 
(50.00') feet across Seneca Lane to the point of beginning. 

Fenway Street - Beginning at a point on the easterly edge of the right- 
of-way of Rollins Road at the southeast property corner now or formerly 
owned by John and Cheryl Spracklin as shown on the plan of land 
entitled "Fenway Street Wilmington, MA Street Acceptance Plan" prepared 
by GCG Associates and dated December 31, 2002; thence running N 39°- 
18' -53" E, one hundred one and sixty hundredths (101.60') feet to a 
stone bound; thence running northerly, along an eighty (80.00') foot 
radius curve, eighty-one and thirty hundredths (81.30') feet to the 
left to a stone bound; thence running N 18° -54 '-40" W, fifty three and 
ninety eight hundredths (53.98') feet to a stone bound; thence running 
northerly along a thirty (30.00') foot radius curve to the left, twenty 
six and eighty seven hundredths (26.87') feet to a stone bound; thence 
northerly along a fifty (50.00') foot radius curve to the right, two 
hundred forty six and sixty five hundredths (246.65') feet to a stone 
bound; thence running southerly along a thirty (30.00') foot radius 
curve to the left, twenty six and eighty seven hundredths (26.87') feet 
to a stone bound; thence running S 18°-54'-40" E, fifty three and 
ninety eight hundredths (53.98') feet to a point; thence running 

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b. 



southerly along a one hundred and twenty (120.00') foot radius curve to 
the right, one hundred twenty two and eighty eight hundredths (122.88') 
feet to a stone bound; thence running S 39°-18'-53" W, one hundred and 
sixty six hundredths (100.66') feet to a point; thence running N 50°- 
41' -29" W, forty (40.00') feet to the point of beginning. 

c. Foley Farm Road - Beginning at the southeasterly corner of land now or 
formerly owned by Timothy & Michele Burke and the northerly sideline of 
Kilmarnock Street as shown on the plan of land entitled "Street 
Acceptance Plan, Foley Farm Road, Wilmington, Massachusetts" prepared 
by Design Consultants, Inc. and dated January 27, 2004; thence running 
N 03° -09 '-25" E a distance of one hundred eighty-eight and eighty six 
hundredths (188.86') feet to an iron pipe (lot marker); thence running 
N 03° -09 '-25" E a distance of nineteen and eight three hundredths 
(19.83') feet to a stone bound; thence running along a curve to the 
right having a radius of one hundred twenty- five (125.00') feet , a 
distance of one hundred thirty nine and fifteen hundredths (13 9.15') 
feet to a stone bound; thence running along a curve to the right having 
a radius of sixty (60.00') feet, a distance of two hundred thirty six 
and five hundredths (236.05') feet to a stone bound; thence running 
along a curve to the left having a radius of twenty (20.00') feet, a 
distance of thirty eight and thirteen hundredths (38.13') feet to a 
stone bound; thence S 03°-06'-28" W a distance of twenty-four and forty 
four hundredths (24.44') feet to an iron pipe lot marker; thence running 
S 03°-09'-25" W a distance of one hundred forty-five and ninety five 
hundredths (145.95') feet to a stone bound; thence S 03°-09'-25" W a 
distance of twenty one and five hundredths (21.05') feet; thence 
running N 86°-50'-35" W a distance of fifty (50.00') feet to the point 
of beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy reads the same as above with the addition of 
the amount of $ 1,500 . Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning 
Board recommends approval . The Planning Board recommends approval 
because these three streets were constructed through the subdivision 
control process and the work has been completed. Motion seconded and 
approved as amended, adding amount of $ 1,500. So voted. 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn as #29) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue in force the Revolving Fund as established at the 
Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, 
Section 53E M for the purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental 
Trust or the Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair 
and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; and 
additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other loan repayments to 
the Town from property owners participating in said program and to authorize 
the Board of Health, with the approval of the Town Manager to administer and 
expend such funds received for the purposes of repairing and upgrading sewage 
disposal systems under Title 5 in accordance with the regulations promulgated 
by the Department of Environmental Protection and further to establish a 
spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the Subsurface Sewage 
Disposal Upgrade Revolving Fund as established by Article 17 of the 
Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 be continued and reauthorized for 
FY-05 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E M for the 
purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental Trust or the 
Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair and 
upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; and 
additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other loan 
repayments to the town from property owners participating in said 
program and further the Board of Health, with the approval of the Town 



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Manager, is hereby authorized to administer and expend such funds 
received for the purposes of repairing and upgrading sewage disposal 
systems under Title 5 in accordance with the regulations promulgated by 
the Department of Environmental Protection, and further the FY-05 
spending limit of $200,000 for said account is hereby established." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 22. (Drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to enact a Special Act which 
would provide for safe placement of newborns and infants in the Town of 
Wilmington, such Act to read as follows: 



Whereas, the General Court finds and declares that a serious public emergency 
exists with respect to the safety and health of newborns and infants in the 
Town of Wilmington due to parents that abandon them; and 

Whereas, unless parents of newborns or infants are not protected from 
prosecution for their abandonment of a newborn or infant then the incidents 
of newborns discarded into trash receptacles or abandoned in public places 
will continue to occur; and 

Whereas, the serious public emergency should be met by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts immediately, with due regard for the rights and 
responsibilities of the Town of Wilmington. 

Therefore, this act is declared to be in the public interest. 

Section 1. Acceptance of Newborns and Infants Placed by Parents or Lawful 
Agents of Parents with Authorized Employees of Designated Facilities. 



Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special law to the contrary 
and in order to promote the public good, the Massachusetts Department of 
Social Services ("department") shall accept for placement into foster care 
any newborn or infant child seven (7) days of age or younger ("newborn or 
infant" or "child") that is voluntarily placed with a hospital emergency room 
licensed under General Laws Chapter 111, Section 51 in the Town of Wilmington 
("designated facility"), or left at a police station in the Town of 
Wilmington, or at a fire station in the Town of Wilmington for transport to 
such hospital emergency room (by activating the EMS system) by a parent of a 
newborn or infant or by a legal agent of said parent. A voluntary placement 
under these provisions shall not constitute an automatic termination of 
parental rights or an abrogation of parental rights or responsibilities but 
shall, for purposes of authorizing the department to initiate a petition to 
terminate parental rights under General Laws, Chapter 210, be presumed to be 
abandonment of the newborn or infant that has been so placed. A hospital 
emergency room receiving a newborn or infant shall immediately notify the 
department of the placement of a newborn or infant ("notice") . Upon 
receiving a notice the department shall take physical custody of the newborn 
or infant immediately and shall initiate all actions authorized by law to 
achieve the safety and permanency of the newborn or infant in a manner that 
is consistent with the best interests of the child; provided however, that if 
the newborn or infant is in need of emergency or other medical care, the 
department shall not take immediate physical custody of the child until such 
care has been fully administered and completed to the hospital emergency 
room's satisfaction. The department shall develop and implement a protocol 
of communication and procedure to facilitate the placement of and provide for 
the custody and care of a newborn or infant. If a person claiming to be a 
parent or lawful agent of a parent of a newborn or infant left with a 
designated facility submits a request to the department for reunification 
with the newborn or infant, the department shall institute the procedures 
currently authorized by law to identify, contact, and investigate such person 



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or agent in order to determine, pursuant to the applicable provisions of law, 
if reunification is in the best interests of the child, or if it is in the 
best interests of the child to terminate the parental rights of the parent. 

Each hospital emergency room in the Town of Wilmington shall designate 
members of the emergency room staff authorized ("authorized employee") to 
take physical custody of a newborn or infant under these sections, and one 
(1) such nurse shall be on duty during regular business hours. Each hospital 
emergency room shall designate an area in the emergency room where physical 
custody of a newborn or infant may be taken. Each police station in the Town 
of Wilmington and fire station in the Town of Wilmington shall, to the 
greatest practical extent that does not interfere with the primary functions 
of the police station or fire station, shall be authorized to activate the 
EMS system for the purpose of transfer to the hospital emergency room on 
receipt of physical custody of a newborn or infant under these sections. 

Authorized employees at the designated facility or the EMS system shall make 
every effort to solicit the following information from the parent or lawful 
agent, who is placing the newborn or infant: (1) the name of the child, (2) 
the name and address of the parent placing the child, (3) name and address of 
the parent absent from the placement of the child for the purposes of 
notification and protecting the absent parent's constitutional rights with 
regard to parenting, (4) name and address of the person leaving the child, if 
not a parent, (5) the location of the child's birthplace, (6) the medical 
histories of the child and parents including, but not limited to, birth and 
medical records, if available, and (7) any other information that might 
reasonably assist the department or the courts of the Commonwealth in current 
and future determinations of the best interests of the child, including 
whether or not the parent plans to seek future custody of the child. The 
authorized employee receiving the newborn or infant shall encourage the 
parent or lawful agent of the parent to provide the requested information in 
order to ensure that the child's best interests are served, but the parent or 
lawful agent is not required to provide such information. The department and 
the designated facility shall maintain copies of forms and records, if any, 
collected or created as a result of placements made under these sections, and 
shall adhere to all applicable laws, rules, and regulations regarding the 
confidentiality of such forms and records provided, however, that all 
information pertaining to the medical history of the newborn or lawful agent 
shall be forwarded by the designated facilities to the department in order to 
facilitate the safe and permanent placement of a child by the department. 

These authorized employees shall provide the parent or lawful agent with a 
numbered identification bracelet. The bracelet shall be used to link the 
parent to the child for identification purposes only and shall not be 
construed to authorize the person in possession of the bracelet to take 
custody of the child on demand. If parental rights have not be terminated, 
possession of a bracelet linking the parent or agent to a newborn or infant 
left with an authorized employee shall create a rebuttable presumption that 
the parent or lawful agent has standing to participate in a custody hearing 
for the child, but shall not create a presumption of maternity, paternity or 
custody . 

Envelopes containing the above information (pamphlet, medical history form, 
and identification bracelet) should be provided to all fire and police 
stations for distribution as needed. 

Section 2. Placement of Newborns and Infants by Parents or Lawful Agents of 
Parents with Authorized Employees of Designated Facilities. 



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The act of leaving an unharmed newborn or infant with an authorized employee 
of a designated facility does not, by itself, constitute a basis for a 
finding of abuse or neglect of the child pursuant to the laws of the 
Commonwealth, nor does it by itself, constitute a violation of criminal 
statutes for child abuse and neglect or for abandonment under General Laws 
Chapter 119, Section 3 9 when there is additional evidence that the person who 
left the child intended that the child be safe from physical injury or harm. 
If there is suspected child abuse or neglect that is not based solely on the 
newborn or infant having been left with an authorized employee of a 
designated facility in compliance with these sections, the personnel of the 
designated facilities who are mandated reporters under General Laws, Chapter 
119, Section 51A must report the abuse or neglect. 

Section 3. Information Program. 

There shall be a public information program regarding the procedures stated 
in these sections including, but not limited to, the development of a 
pamphlet describing these aforesaid procedures, the rights and 
responsibilities of the parent (s) and extended family members, the legal 
consequences of placement of a newborn or infant into foster care, the 
relevant telephone numbers of the department or its agents and family 
preservation services. 

Such a public information program shall be funded by grants and donations not 
limited to, but including those from the United States Department of Health 
and Human Services pursuant to the Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
Program. 

Section 4. Harmonious Construction. 

This act shall be construed harmoniously to the extent practicable with any 
other general or special law such that all such legislation effectively 
provides the greatest level of safety for newborns and infants and the 
greatest level of equity and fairness to parents and lawful agents. 

Section 5. Severability. 

If any provision of these sections or the application of such provision to 
any person or circumstance shall be held invalid, the validity of the 
remainder of these sections and the applicability of such provision to other 
persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby. 

Section 6. Effective Date. 

The provisions of these sections shall be effective immediately upon passage; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy reads the same as the above article. This 
article allows selectmen to petition the state to enact a special law 
that will provide a location in Wilmington where a newborn child could 
be safely brought. The Public Safety Building would be the location in 
Wilmington. Thirty-eight states have accepted this act. This act 
provides a safe haven for newborns seven days or younger. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen, in accordance with Chapter 40, Section 15 of the General 
Laws, to abandon, for no compensation, all right, title and interest in and 
to a certain drainage easement granted to the Town by Valley Properties, 
Inc., affecting the land at 240 Main Street, described in Assessor's records 



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as Map 43, Parcel 5, said easement having been registered with the Land Court 
Department of the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds as Document No. 
191659, as noted on Certificate of Title No. 15853, Book 82, Page 107, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to execute and accept on the Town's behalf 
another easement from Valley Properties, Inc., at a location and on terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Board of Selectmen, to replace that 
certain drainage easement sought to be abandoned hereunder; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Raymond N. Lepore, "I move that the Board of Selectmen be 
hereby authorized, in accordance with Chapter 40, Section 15 of General 
Laws, to abandon, for no compensation, all right, title and interest in 
and to a certain drainage easement granted to the Town by Valley 
Properties, Inc., affecting the land at 240 Main Street, described in 
Assessor's records as Map 43, Parcel 5, said easement having been 
registered with the Land Court Department of the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Document No. 191659, as noted on 
Certificate of Title No. 15853, Book 82, Page 107, and further that 
the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to execute and accept on 
the Town's behalf another easement from Valley Properties, Inc., near 
the location and on terms and conditions as shall be determined by the 
Board of Selectmen, to replace that certain drainage easement 
authorized to be abandoned hereunder." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 24 . (drawn as #13) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to enter into an agreement, the terms of which shall be as 
determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise dispose of, all or 
part of the following described parcels, following a determination made by 
the Town Manager that the land is not needed for any municipal purpose, and 
in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington Revised, and other applicable law: The parcel located 
on John Street, described in the Assessor's records as Map 18, Parcel 30 and 
the parcels located on Pitman Street, described in the Assessor's records as 
Map 18, Parcels 34, 35, 36 and 36A; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to enter into an agreement, the terms of which shall be as 
determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise dispose of, 
all or part of the following described parcels, following a 
determination made by the Town Manager that the land is not needed for 
any municipal purpose for a sum of not less than $350,000, and in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Wilmington Revised, and other applicable law: The 
parcel located on John Street, described in the Assessor's records as 
Map 18, Parcel 30 and the parcels located on Pitman Street, described 
in the Assessor's records as Map 18, Parcels 34, 35, 36 and 36A." 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Planning Board recommends 
disapproval. This group of parcels contains both wetlands and upland. 
The Planning Board does not support the sale of these parcels of town 
land, as a portion is wetland. Town Manager stated this land has been 
declared surplus to the needs of the Town. Assessor has set fair 
market value of $350,000. Administration believes that its sale would 
not have any negative impact on the Town and it identifies for us a 
source of revenue. Robert Dodge, 117 John Street was opposed, this is 
quiet neighborhood and this wooded area adds to quality of life in 
neighborhood. Much discussion followed both for and against sale. Mr. 
Morris, Conservation Commission recommends disapproval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Moderator declared motion fails for lack of 
2/3rds vote. 



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ARTICLE 25. (drawn #30) To see if the town will vote to establish a nine 
member Government Study Committee to review the structure of the town's 
government and to report whether changes should be made, and if so, what 
changes, and by what ways and means to effect such changes, such Committee to 
be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, provided however, no member of such 
Committee shall be a person holding a town office or employment with the 
town; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Suzanne M. Sullivan, "I move that a nine member Government 
Study Committee be established to review the structure of the town's 
government and to report whether changes should be made, and if so, 
what changes, and by what ways and means to effect such changes, such 
Committee to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, provided however, 
no member of such Committee shall be a person holding a town office or 
employment with the town." This committee would review the charter and 
make recommendations for changes if they deemed it necessary. Selectman 
West stated much has changed in Wilmington since 1950 when current 
charter was established. Other residents disagreed and took issue with 
fact that residents on committees, boards and Town Employees could not 
be on Committee. Selectman Newhouse stated citizens took action on a 
change to charter in last year's Town Meeting by petitioned article and 
change was effective. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. 
Motion seconded and so voted. Article defeated declared by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #11) To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 40, Section 22F and establish a uniform 
procedure for setting fees in municipal departments by amending the By-laws 
of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington revised. 

Text of General Laws Chapter 40, Section 22F 

Fees and Charges for Licenses, Permits, and Work Performed. 

Any municipal board or officer empowered to issue a license, permit, 
certificate, or to render a service or perform work for a person or class of 
persons, may, from time to time, fix reasonable fees for all such licenses, 
permits, or certificates issued pursuant to statutes or regulations, wherein 
the entire proceeds of the fee remain with such issuing city or town, and may 
fix reasonable charges to be paid, for any services rendered or work 
performed by the city or town or any department thereof, for any person or 
class of persons . 

A fee or charge imposed pursuant to this section shall supersede fees or 
charges already in effect, or any limitations on amounts placed thereon for 
the same service, work, license, permit or certificate, provided that this 
section shall not supersede the provisions of chapter six A sections thirty- 
one through seventy-seven, chapter eighty, chapter eighty- three , or chapter 
one hundred and thirty-eight. The fee or charge being collected immediately 
prior to acceptance of this section for any license, permit, certificate 
service or work will be utilized until a new fee or charge is fixed under 
this section. 

The provisions of this section may be accepted in a city by a vote of the 
city council, with the approval of the mayor if so required by law, and in a 
town by vote of the town meeting, or by vote of the town council in towns 
with no town meeting. 



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Amendments to By-laws: 



Chapter 1, Section 3, as appearing in said by-laws, is hereby amended by 
adding the following sentence at the end of said Section 3 as it appears in 
the current version of said by-laws: 

"Each municipal department, board or office shall, pursuant to chapter 40, 
section 22F of the general laws of the Commonwealth, from time to time fix or 
set reasonable fees for the issuance of all licenses, permits or certificates 
issued pursuant to statutes, regulations or bylaws by any municipal board, 
commission, or officer empowered to issue a license, permit, or certificate, 
within any limitations that may be imposed by statute, provided however that 
such fees shall take effect upon approval by the Town Manager and the Board 
of Selectmen . " 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 3. When in any by-law anything is prohibited from being done without 
license or permission from a certain officer, board or commission, such 
officer, board or commission shall have the power to license or permit such 
thing to be done unless otherwise provided by law or by some by-law. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 3. When in any by-law anything is prohibited from being done without 
license or permission from a certain officer, board or commission, such 
officer, board or commission shall have the power to license or permit such 
thing to be done unless otherwise provided by law or by some by-law. Each 
municipal department, board or office shall, pursuant to chapter 40, section 
22F of the general laws of the Commonwealth, from time to time fix or set 
reasonable fees for the issuance of all licenses, permits or certificates 
issued pursuant to statutes, regulations or bylaws by any municipal board, 
commission, or officer empowered to issue a license, permit, or certificate, 
within any limitations that may be imposed by statute, provided however that 
such fees shall take effect upon approval by the Town Manager and the Board 
of Selectmen. 

Chapter 1, Section 7. As appearing in said by-laws, is hereby amended by 
adding the words "fees collected pursuant to Section 3 of this Chapter; and 
all" after the word "All" as it appears in the current version; and this 
section is further amended by deleting all the words after the words "Town 
Treasury" and replacing them with the words "except in accordance with other 
provisions of law or by-law. " 

By-law in Effect. 

SECTION 7: All fines, penalties and forfeitures for the violation of any by- 
law shall be paid into the Town Treasury and credited to the Excess and 
Deficiency Fund unless otherwise provided by law or by some by-law of the 
Town. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

SECTION 7 : All fees collected pursuant to Section 3 of this Chapter; and all 
fines, penalties and forfeitures for the violation of any by-law shall be 
paid into the Town Treasury except in accordance with other provisions of law 
or by-law. 



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Chapter 1, Section 10. As appearing in said by-laws is hereby amended by 
deleting this section in its entirety and inserting in its place the 
following : 

SECTION 10: The fees for sealing of weights and measuring services shall be 
fixed in accordance with Chapter 1, Section 3. 

By-law in Effect. 

SECTION 10. Sealing of Weights and Measures Services (Rev. 4/90) 



Scale w/ capacity over 10,000 lbs. 


50 


00 


Scale w/ capacity 5-10,000 lbs. 


35 


00 


Scale w/ capacity 1-5,000 lbs. 


25 


00 


Scale w/ capacity 100-1,000 lbs. 


15 


00 


Scale/balances 10-100 lbs. 


9 


00 


Scales/balances under 10 lbs. 


7 


00 


Liquid capacity measures of capacity of more 






than onf* aal 1 on and m^^QiiT*p r\r\ t^iittit^c; 


•3 


n n 


Liquid measuring meter diameter - ^" - 1" 


8 


00 


Liquid measuring meter diameter over 1" 


9 


00 


Vehicle tank pump 


20 


00 


Vehicle tank gravity 


25 


.00 


Bulk Storage 


45 


.00 


Bulk Storage/w cert, prover 


25 


00 


Taximeter 


8 


.00 


Device to determine linear or area 


5 


.00 


Milk bottle or jars - per gross 


8 


00 


Vehicle tanks used in sale of commodities by 






liquid measure per 100 gallon 


5 


00 


Separate tanks - same vehicle (each) 


5 


00 


All other weights and measures 




50 


License for Automatic Amusement Devices 


50 


00 


Permit for Raffles and Bazaars 


50 


00 



Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 10. The fees for sealing of weights and measuring services shall be 
fixed in accordance with Chapter 1, Section 3. 

Chapter 3, Section 26. As appearing in said by-laws is hereby amended by 
deleting this section in its entirety and inserting in its place the 
following : 

SECTION 26: The fees of the Town Clerk shall be fixed in accordance with 
Chapter 1, Section 3. 

By-law in Effect. 

FEE SCHEDULE-TOWN CLERK 

Section 26. The Selectmen and the Town Clerk shall adopt and set such fees of 
the Town Clerk, as they shall deem reasonable and appropriate. These fees 
shall take effect upon the posting at the office of the Town Clerk and 
publication once in a newspaper of local circulation of the fee schedule 
(Pursuant to G.L. Chapter 262, Section 34). 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 26. The fees of the Town Clerk shall be fixed in accordance with 
Chapter 1, Section 3. 



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Chapter 5, Section 29. As appearing in said by-laws is hereby amended by 
deleting clause B and inserting in its place the following: 

B. The fees for dog licenses shall be set in accordance with Chapter 1, 
Section 3 . 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 29 (B) : 

B. Fees - The fee for every dog license shall be as follows: 
Seven Dollars ($7.00) for every neutered male dog 
Seven Dollars ($7.00) for every spayed female dog 
Eleven Dollars ($11.00) for every male and female dog 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 29 (B) 

B. The fees for dog licenses shall be set in accordance with Chapter 
1, Section 3. 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee reads the 
same as above. This article is result of study Town Manager asked By- 
law Study Committee to perform, one uniform method for all Departments 
to set fees. The Department Heads will make recommendations to Town 
Manager and then Town Manager will make recommendations to Board of 
Selectmen for their approval. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27 . (drawn #15) To see if the town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Changes are Underlined 
Chapter 1, Section 5 

VIOLATION OF BY-LAWS: FINE NOT TO EXCEED $200 
By-law in Effect. 

SECTION 5. Whoever violates any of the provisions of these By-laws whereby 
any act or thing is enjoined or prohibited, shall unless other provisions are 
expressly made, forfeit and pay a fine not exceeding $200 for each offense. 

Proposed Change to the By-Law 
VIOLATION OF BY-LAWS: FINE OF $300 

SECTION 5. Whoever violates any of the provisions of these By-laws whereby 
any act or thing is enjoined or prohibited shall, except as otherwise 
provided in these By-laws, forfeit and pay a fine of $300 for each offense. 

Chapter 1, Section 6 

REFUSAL TO OBEY: FINE OF $2 

By-Law in Effect. 

SECTION 6. Whoever shall refuse or neglect to obey any lawful order of any 
town officer or board of town officers, issued under any of these By-laws, 
directed to him and properly served upon him, shall in cases not otherwise 
provided for, forfeit and pay for every offense a fine not exceeding $200 for 
each offense. 



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Proposed Change to the By-Law 
REFUSAL TO OBEY: FINE OF $3 00 

SECTION 6. Whoever shall refuse or neglect to obey any lawful order of any 
town officer or board of town officers, issued under any of these By-laws, 
directed to him and properly served upon him, shall in cases not otherwise 
provided for, forfeit and pay for every offense a fine of $300 for each 
offense. Each day of a continuing refusal or neglect to obey such a lawful 
order shall constitute a separate offense. 

Chapter 5, Section 15 

INJURY TO TREES AND SHRUBS PROHIBITED 
By-law in Effect. 

Section 15. No person without proper authority to do so, shall climb any 
trees or injure any tree or shrubbery standing in any public way or public 
place, and no person shall permit or suffer any animal under his care to in 
any way injure any such tree or shrubbery. Whoever violates any provisions 
of this section shall forfeit and pay for each offense a fine not to exceed 
two hundred ($200.00) dollars plus the cost of the destruction to the 
property. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 15. No person without proper authority to do so, shall climb any 
trees or injure any tree or shrubbery standing in any public way or public 
place, and no person shall permit or suffer any animal under his care to in 
any way injure any such tree or shrubbery. Whoever violates any provisions 
of this section shall forfeit and pay for each offense a fine of three 
hundred ($300.00) dollars plus the cost of the destruction to the property 
for each offense. 

Chapter 5, Section 20 
UNREGISTERED MOTOR VEHICLES 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 20. No person shall, except as otherwise provided by law, store, 
park or place or cause to be stored, parked or placed, unregistered motor 
vehicles which are unfit for use, permanently disabled or have been 
dismantled or are otherwise inoperative upon any land in the Town unless the 
same shall be within a building or in an area unexposed to the view of the 
public or abutters or upon premises maintained by licensed dealers. Whoever 
violates any provision of this section shall forfeit and pay for each offense 
a fine not exceeding fifty ($50.00) dollars. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 20. No person shall, except as otherwise provided by law, store, 
park or place or cause to be stored, parked or placed, any unregistered motor 
vehicles which are unfit for use, permanently disabled or have been 
dismantled or are otherwise inoperative upon any land in the Town unless the 
same shall be within a building or in an area unexposed to the view of the 
public or abutters or upon premises maintained by licensed dealers. Whoever 
violates any provision of this section shall be fined three hundred ($300.00) 
dollars . 



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chapter 5, Section 30 

ERECTING BARRIERS ON EXCAVATION 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 30. The owners of land which has been excavated are hereby required 
to erect barriers or take other suitable measures within five (5) days after 
such owners have been notified in writing by the Selectmen that in their 
opinion such excavation constitutes a hazard to public safety. The penalty 
for violation of this Section shall be fifty ($50.00) dollars for each day 
such violation continues, shall not exceed two hundred (200.00) dollars. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 30. The owners of land which has been excavated are hereby required 
to erect barriers or take other suitable measures within five (5) days after 
such owners have been notified in writing by the Selectmen that in their 
opinion such excavation constitutes a hazard to public safety. Any person 
violating the provisions of this Chapter 5, Section 30 shall be fined three 
hundred dollars ($300.00) for each offense. Each day of such violation shall 
constitute a separate offense. 

Chapter 5, Section 40. 
SOLICITORS OR CANVASSERS 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 1. License required. It shall be unlawful for any solicitor or 
canvasser, as defined in Section 2 of this by-law to engage in such business 
in the Town of Wilmington without first obtaining a license in compliance 
with the provisions of this by-law. Any person who is not properly licensed 
under this by-law shall be ordered to immediately cease and desist all 
solicitation in the town until they attain a proper license. Whoever 
continues to solicit without a proper license after being notified to cease 
and desist by a police officer, may be summoned for court prosecution and 
fined up to $200.00 for each violation. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section 1. License required. It shall be unlawful for any solicitor or 
canvasser, as defined in Section 2 of this by-law to engage in such business 
in the Town of Wilmington without first obtaining a license in compliance 
with the provisions of this by-law. Any person who is not properly licensed 
under this by-law shall be ordered to immediately cease and desist all 
solicitation in the town until they attain a proper license. Whoever 
continues to solicit without a proper license after being notified to cease 
and desist by a police officer, may be summoned for court prosecution and 
fined $300.00 for each violation; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee reads the 
same as above article, changing fee on all violations from $200 to 
$300. Finance Committee recommends approval. These fee increases 
recommended by Town Counsel. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 



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ARTICLE 28 . (drawn #22) To see if the town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Changes are Underlined 

Chapter 2, Section lOA 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETINGS 

By-Law in Effect. 

The Annual Town Meeting shall act upon the following matters as warrant 
articles in such order as shall be prescribed by the Board of Selectmen: 

1. Conduct of Town elections. 

2. Committee reports and any action thereon. 

3. For purpose of paying unpaid bills. 

4. To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to enter into compensating balance agreements, under the 
provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53F. 

5. To appropriate monies for expenses of the Town and salaries of Town 
officers and Departments and determine how same shall be raised. 

6. To appropriate monies for capital expenditures. 

Proposed Change to the By-Law 

The Annual Town Meeting shall act upon the following matters as warrant 
articles in such order as shall be prescribed by the Board of Selectmen: 

1. Conduct of Town elections. 

2. Committee reports and any action thereon. 

3. For purpose of paying unpaid bills. 

4. To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to enter into compensating balance agreements, under the 
provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53F. 

5. To appropriate monies for expenses of the Town and salaries of Town 
officers and Departments and determine how same shall be raised. 

6. To appropriate monies for capital expenditures. 

7. All other articles in the warrant shall be taken in the order in which 
they appear in the warrant . 

Chapter 2, Section lOB 
RANDOM SELECTION 

By-Law in Effect. 

All other articles in said warrant shall be enumerated by the Board of 
Selectmen, provided however, that at the Annual Town Meeting, the number of 
each such article shall be placed in a container and Town Moderator shall 
draw a number and as each number is drawn, that article shall be presented to 
the Town Meeting for action, and further provided, however, that certain 
articles which are in sequence and related to each other whereby the passage 
of the first article is dependent upon action of the next article may be 
taken as one drawing for action. Except as herein provided no article shall 
be acted upon out of the order as drawn by the Town Moderator. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Delete Section lOB - Random Selection 



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Chapter 2, Section IOC 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETINGS 

By-Law in Effect. 

All warrant articles for a Special Town Meeting shall be enumerated by the 
Board of Selectmen. The number of each article shall be placed in a 
container and the Town Moderator shall draw a number and as each number is 
drawn, that article shall be presented to the Special Town Meeting for action 
as provided in Section lOB of Chapter 2 above. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Section IOC Becomes Section lOB 
Section lOB. Special Town Meetings 

All warrant articles for a Special Town Meeting shall be enumerated by the 
Board of Selectmen and shall be taken in the order in which they appear in 
the warrant . 

Chapter 2, Section 15 

By-Law in Effect. 

SECTION 15. No person shall speak for more than ten (10) minutes on any 
question prior to the closing of debate without first obtaining leave of the 
meeting, nor more than twice except to correct a mistake or make an 
explanation. The maker of the main motion may grant to any other person a 
part or whole of his time or give his time to the meeting. This ten (10) 
minute limit includes time used for showing charts, movies, slides, maps, 
etc. which may enhance a presentation. 

Proposed Change to the By-Law. 

SECTION 15. Except for the maker of the main motion, who shall be permitted 
to speak for no more than ten (10) minutes on the question, no person shall 
speak for more than five (5) minutes on any question prior to the closing of 
debate without first obtaining leave of the meeting, nor more than twice 
except to correct a mistake or make an explanation. The maker of the main 
motion may grant to any other person a part or whole of his time or give his 
time to the meeting. These limits include time used for showing charts, 
movies, slides, maps, etc. which may enhance a presentation. 

Chapter 2, Section 17 
DETERMINATION OF THE VOTE 

By-law in Effect. 

SECTION 17. When a motion is put, (applicable to a majority or two-thirds 
vote) ; the sense of the meeting shall be determined by the voices of the 
voters, and the Moderator shall declare the vote as it appears to him. If 
the Moderator is unable to decide the vote by the sound of voices, or if his 
decision is immediately questioned by seven or more voters rising in their 
places for that purpose, the Moderator shall without debate determine the 
vote by appointing tellers to make and return the count or he shall order a 
poll of the meeting by use of "yes" and "no" ballots with the use of the 
check lists if forty voters rising in their places for that purpose favor 
such motion. 



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Proposed Change to the By-law. 

SECTION 17 . When a motion is put, (applicable to a majority or two-thirds 
vote) ; the sense of the meeting shall be determined by the voices of the 
voters, and the Moderator shall declare the vote as it appears to him. If 
the Moderator is unable to decide the vote by the sound of voices, or if his 
decision is immediately questioned by seven or more voters rising in their 
places for that purpose, the Moderator shall without debate determine the 
vote by appointing tellers to make and return the count. 

DELETE 

or he shall order a poll of the meeting by use of "yes" and "no" ballots with 
the use of the check lists if forty voters rising in their places for that 
purpose favor such motion; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer reads the same as above article. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Mr. Spencer stated this article was 
drafted for the convenience of the people. Motion by John C. Nitchie, 
"I move to amend Article 28 by deleting proposed item 7 applicable to 
Chapter 2, Section lOA from this Article and modifying the respective 
language to Sections lOB & IOC." Regarding item 7, Mr. Nitchie 
believes the system of taking articles in order was disruptive to the 
meeting. He wishes to keep random selection as is and rest of the 
article remains the same. Many citizens spoke for and against the 
removal of random selection. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 61 No 
41. Article approved as amended. 

ARTICLE 29 . (drawn as #12) To see if the town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Changes are Underlined 
Chapter 3, Section 17. 
By-law in Effect. 

SECTION 17. The Selectmen, with advice, may institute, prosecute, defend, 
compromise and settle claims, actions, suits or other proceedings brought by, 
on behalf of, or against the Town, provided however, that in no case shall a 
settlement be so made by a payment of more than $500 without a vote of 
authority from the Town. They may employ special counsel in suits by or 
against the Town whenever they deem it necessary. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

SECTION 17. Repealed April 24, 2004; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee, "I move that 
the "Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington," be 
amended by deleting: Chapter 3, Section 17. He explained the very same 
authority is found in Town Charter, Section 12 (i) . This change was 
recommendation by Town Counsel. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
"Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Changes are underlined 

Chapter 3, New Section 28. 
MEMORIALIZE PUBLIC PROPERTY 

SECTION 28. The authority to dedicate, memorialize, or otherwise designate 
by name any town owned property, field, park, stadium, playground or building 
or any portion thereof, after any person, living or deceased, shall be 
exercised solely by Town Meeting vote,- - or do anything in relation thereto. 

Chapter 3, New Section 28. 
MEMORIALIZE PUBLIC PROPERTY 

SECTION 28. The authority to name any town owned property, field, park, 
stadium, playground or building after any person, living or deceased or 
organization shall be exercised solely by Town Meeting vote. 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee, "I move that 
the "Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town Wilmington", be 
amended adding a new Section 28 to Chapter 3 to read as follows: 

MEMORIALIZE PUBLIC PROPERTY 

SECTION 28. The authority to name any town owned property, field, park, 
stadium, playground or building after any person, living or deceased, or 
organization shall be exercised solely by Town Meeting vote. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #10) To see if the town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 
Proposed Changes are Underlined 

Chapter 5, Section 14 

SALE OF SPRAY PAINT TO MINORS 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 14 . 

a. No person shall knowingly sell to any child under eighteen (18) years of 
age any aerosol container of paint capable of defacing property. 

b. For purposes herein, bona fide evidence of majority, identity of majority 
and identity of a person is a document issued by a federal, state, county 
or municipal government, or subdivision or agency thereof, including, but 
not limited to, a motor vehicle operators license, a registration 
certificate issued under the Federal Selective Service Act (50 App . 
U.S.C. *451 et sec), identification card issued to a member of the Armed 
Forces or a birth certificate. Proof that the defendant, or his employee 
or agent, demanded, was shown and acted in reliance upon such bona fide 
evidence in any sale transaction forbidden hereby, shall be a defense to 
any criminal prosecution therefore. 

c. Any person who owns, manages or operates a place of business wherein 
aerosol containers of paint capable of defacing property are sold shall 
conspicuously post notice of this law in such place of business in 
letters at least one inch (1") high. 



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d. Any person violating the provisions of this by-law shall be fined not 

less than fifty dollars ($50.00) nor more than two hundred ($200.00) for 
each offense. 

POSSESSION AND MANUFACTURE OF SPRAY PAINT BY MINORS: 



a. It shall be illegal for any person under eighteen (18) years of age to 
possess and manufacture any aerosol container of paint capable of 
defacing property, unless otherwise accompanied by a parent or legal 
guardian . 

b. Any person under the age of eighteen (18) found violating the provisions 
of this by-law shall be fined not less than fifty dollars ($50.00) nor 
more than two hundred ($200.00) for each offense. 

c. Possession shall be defined as having on or about a person, spray 
propellant type paint unless otherwise accompanied by a parent or legal 
guardian . 

d. Exemption - Nothing in this by-law shall prohibit the employment of a 
person under age 18, in or by a commercial business involving the 
manufacture, distribution, or sale of said spray paint devices. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

ABATEMENT OF GRAFFITI AND THE SALE OF SPRAY PAINT TO MINORS 
Section 14 . 

a . Graffiti Abatement 

1 • Definition of "Graffiti". Any word, figure or painted design that 

is marked, etched, scratched, drawn, painted, pasted or otherwise 
affixed to or on any surface, regardless of the nature of the 
material of that structural component, to the extent the same was 
not authorized in advance by the owner thereof. 

2 ■ Public Nuisance. The existence of graffiti on any real property or 

structure within the town is expressly declared to be a public 
nuisance affecting public health, safety and welfare. 

3 . Graffiti Prohibited. No owner of any real property within the town 

shall allow any graffiti to remain upon any structure located on 
the owner's property when the graffiti is visible from the street 
or from other public or private property. 

4 . Notification of Violation. Whenever the Health Department 
determines that graffiti on any building or structure within the 
town is visible from the street or from other public or private 
property, the Health Department shall issue an order to the owner 
of the property to abate the graffiti in a timely manner, as 
determined by the Health -Department . Such order shall be issued in 
compliance with the requirements of this by-law. 

5 . Compliance. A property owner shall be deemed to have complied with 
an order to abate graffiti if it is obliterated by a primary paint 
and matching building paint or by such other means as shall 
obliterate the graffiti and remove the nuisance. 



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6 . Failure to Comply. If the property owner knowingly fails to comply 
with the order to abate the graffiti, that property owner shall be 
fined three hundred dollars ($300.00) for every day during which he 
knowingly violates such order. 

7 ■ Applicable General Laws. Nothing in this by-law shall be construed 
to limit in any way the Town's authority to order the abatement of 
a nuisance as set forth in M.G.L. c. Ill, §123, or any other 
general laws . 

b. Sale of Spray Paint to Minors 

1. No person shall knowingly sell to any child under eighteen (18) 
years of age any aerosol container of paint capable of defacing 
property . 

2. For purposes herein, bona fide evidence of majority identity and 
identity of person is a document issued by a federal, state, county 
or municipal government or subdivision or agency thereof, 
including, but not limited to, a motor vehicle operators license, a 
registration certificate issued under the Federal Selective Service 
Act (50 App . U.S.C. *451 et seq.), identification card issued to a 
member of the Armed Forces or a birth certificate. Proof that the 
defendant, or his employee or agent, demanded, was shown and acted 
in reliance upon such bona fide evidence in any sale transaction 
forbidden hereby, shall be a defense to any criminal prosecution 
therefore . 

3. Any person who owns, manages or operates a place of business wherein 

aerosol containers of paint capable of defacing property are sold 
shall conspicuously post notice of this law in such place of 
business in letters of at least one inch (1") high. 

c. Possession and Manufacture of Spray Paint by Minors 

1. It shall be illegal for any person under eighteen (18) years of age 
to possess and/or manufacture any aerosol container of paint 
capable of defacing property, unless otherwise accompanied by a 
parent or legal guardian. 

2. Any person under the age of eighteen (18) found violating the 
provisions of this by-law shall be fined three hundred dollars 
($300.00) for each offense. 

3 . Possession shall be defined as having on or about a person, spray 
propellant type paint unless otherwise accompanied by a parent or 
legal guardian. 

4. Exemption-Nothing contained in this by-law shall prohibit the 

employment of a person under age eighteen (18) in or by a 
commercial business involving the manufacture, distribution, or 
sale of said spray paint devices; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee reads same as 
above. Finance Committee recommends approval. This article is being 
presented to address spray paint on private buildings. Presently the 
existing by-law cannot direct the owner to remove spray paint on 
private buildings. This by-law will give the community through its 
Board of Health Director the ability to direct the home or business 
owner to remove the graffiti. Motion by John Goggin, to amend Section 

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14, #6, Failure to Comply. If the property owner knowingly fails to 
comply with the order to abate the graffiti, that property owner shall 
be fined $10.00 per day for every day during which he knowingly 
violates such order. Amendment defeated on voice vote, declared by 
Moderator. Original article as presented seconded and so voted, 
declared by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 32 . (drawn as #20) To see if the town will vote to amend the "Revised 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Changes are Underlined 

Chapter 5, Section 25 
DISCHARGE OF FIREARMS 

By-law in Effect. 

Section 25. Within the Town limits of Wilmington, Massachusetts no person or 
persons shall discharge any firearm, air or gas operated gun of any kind 
except members of the Police Department and other authorized law enforcement 
officers whether Federal, State or Municipal in performance of their lawful 
duties; also with the exception of a person protecting his life or property, 
also excepting the discharge of firearms using blank ammunition in fulfilling 
but not limited to the needs of historical, ceremonial, construction, 
competitive and sporting activities, and a person at an authorized target 
range. The Police Chief may issue permits for target ranges and shall 
inspect such places and establish safety requirements for their use. The 
permit shall be valid for one year and may be revoked for cause at any time 
by the Police Chief. 

Responsible organizations observing historical events or traditional services 
by gravesides, using firearms with blank cartridges and contractors' powder- 
fired charge tools are specifically exempted from this by-law. 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 
Add Section 25.1 

Section 25.1 Hunting on public lands of the Town of Wilmington is prohibited 
per M.G.L. 131, Section 59. When Town Clerk issues a hunting license in 
Wilmington, a copy of this by-law will be presented to the hunting licensee. 
The Town Manager shall have the authority to authorize Public Safety 
Officials to hunt on town owned property in order to address a nuisance 
situation; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman of By-law Study Committee, reads the 
same as the above article. Finance Committee recommends approval. Mr. 
Spencer stated town has had much growth in recent years and development 
is closer to open lands . Do you as a community want to allow hunting 
on public lands in this day and age? Robert LaRivee, John Googin, 
Michael Corrigan, all residents spoke against this by-law as they did 
not want to take away this right from responsible hunters. Motion 
seconded and so voted, Yes 67 No 27. Article approved. 

ARTICLE 33 . (drawn as #16) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
"Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 
Proposed Changes are Underlined 

Chapter 5, Section 37 and Appendix A. 
UNDERGROUND STORAGE 

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By-law in Effect. 
SECTION 37.1. Authority 

This by-law is adopted by the Town of Wilmington under its home rule powers, 
its police powers to protect the public health, safety and welfare, and under 
powers authorized by Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 40, Sec. 21-21D and Ch. 148, Sec. 9. 

SECTION 37.2. Purpose 

The purposes of this by-law are, through regulations to specify and design, 
construction, installation, testing and maintenance of underground petroleum 
storage facilities, to protect public health from the contamination of public 
and private water supplies due to leakage from such facilities, to protect the 
public safety from the dangers of fire and explosion associated with such 
leakage, and to protect the general welfare by preserving water supplies for 
present and future use. 

SECTION 37.3. Definitions 

37.3.1. - Underground tank shall mean any storage containment system (including 
pipes and fittings) in which any portion of the tank is below the ground. 

37.3.2. - Fire Chief shall mean the Chief, or his designee, of the Fire 
Department in Wilmington. 

37.3.3. - Noncorrosive soil is soil that, when tested by a qualified 
Professional, is shown to have a resistivity greater than 10,000 ohm-cm, and 
that does not exhibit corrosive characteristics in a soil-chemistry analysis. 

37.3.4. - ICQ year flood plain shall mean those areas as shown in the Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps for Wilmington under the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency's National Flood Insurance Program, or as defined in Section 6.2.1 of 
the zoning by-law. 

37.3.5. - Observatory well: a dug or drilled cased well which can be used for 
detecting the presence of flammable or combustible liquids and which is drilled 
to a depth of approximately twenty- four (24) inches below the tank bottom. 

37.3.6. - Concrete Vault: means a vault constructed in accordance with figure 
No. 1, Section A, B or B-Typical; or, in the alternative, an acceptable 
engineered approved equivalent as approved by the Fire Chief. 

37.3.7. - Operator/Owner : means the lessee of a storage facility or the person 
or persons responsible for the daily operation of a storage facility. 

37.3.8. - Abnormal gain of water: means a gain in the water level inside any 
tank of more than one (1) inch in a twenty- four hour period during which no 
product has been added. 

37.3.9. - Inventory verification: includes procedures listed under section 
37.6.1 of this by-law and CMR (Commonwealth of Massachusetts Regulations) 527, 
5.05 (3A) . 

37.3.10. - Abandoned: means being out of service for a continuous period in 
excess of six months, in the case of a storage facility for which a license 
from the local licensing authority is required under the provisions of Mass. 
Gen. Laws Ch. 14 8, Sec. 13, as amended. 

37.3.11. - Cathodic protection: means a system that inhibits the corrosion of a 
tank or components through either the sacrificial anode or the impressed 
current method of creating a corrosion- inhibiting electrical current. 



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r 



37.3.12 MSDS - Material Safety Data Sheet: a document identifying a toxic or 
hazardous substance and its manufacturer, and containing certain information 
relating to the risks associated with the substance and procedures for 
eliminating or minimizing those risks; the basic information document required 
by the Law. 

3 7.3.13. - Leakage or leak: means any uncontrolled movement, measurable by a 
final or precision test^ that can accurately detect a leak of 0.05 gallons per 
hour or less, after adjustment for relevant variables such as temperature 
change and tank end deflection, of petroleum product out of a tank or its 
components; or any uncontrolled movement of water into a tank or its 
components . 

SECTION 37.4: Registration of tanks 

37.4.1. - Tank Registration: Every operator/owner of an underground tank must 
file a permit application with the Town Clerk within 90 days of the enactment 
of this by-law. 

37.4.2. - Notification of Fire Department: The Town Clerk must forthwith, give 
the Fire Chief a copy of the information filed for each tank that is registered 
according to section 37.4.1. The Fire Chief or his designee shall check this 
information against Fire Department records. He may require evidence of the 
date of purchase and installation if there is any question concerning the age 
of the tank or tanks . 

37.4.3. - Tank Testing: Operators that are known to have underground storage 
tanks that did not register their tanks as required by section 37.4.1. of the 
by-law shall have such tanks tested in accordance with section 6.2 of this 
by-law. 

37.4.4. - Any change in the information on the permit application must be 
reported to the Town Clerk within 3 days of the change. 

37.4.5. - If no substantial evidence of the date of installation is supplied, 
than the tank shall be presumed to have been installed twenty years prior to 
the effective date of this by-law. 

SECTION 5: Standards Applicable to the Installation of New Tanks 
37.5.1. - Tank Design 

a. All tanks shall be constructed of fiberglass reinforced plastic FRP and 
vaulted in accordance with section 3.6 of this by-law or an acceptable 
engineered approved equivalent as approved by the Fire Chief. 

b. All piping shall be constructed of non-corrodible materials such as FRP 
or its equivalent in accordance with 527 CMR 9.06. 

c. All concrete vaults shall be sealed with a sealing material approved by 
the Fire Chief. All vaults shall be sealed both inside and outside. 

d. All tanks shall be equipped with a leak detection device approved by the 
Fire Chief. 

The criteria for a final or precision test are described in NFPA 329, published 
by the National Fire Protection Association. 

e. All tanks must be equipped with striker plates below openings used for 
product measurement or filling. 

f . When more than one (1) tank is installed, observation wells a minimum of 
two (2) inches in diameter shall be installed at two corners within tank 



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hole excavation. If only one tank is installed, an observation well 
shall be installed at each end of the tank. 

37.5.2. - Tank Installation 

a. The Fire Chief shall inspect and approve underground tanks prior to their 
burial, in accordance with 527 CMR 9.06 (10) . 

b. The Inspector of Buildings or his designee shall inspect and approve all 
concrete vaults . 

c. Tanks shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's 
installation techniques. Damage to protective coatings or to the FRP 
tank or surface shall be repaired prior to covering the tank. 

d. New underground tanks shall be tested for tightness, hydrostatically , 
or with air pressure at not less than three (3) pounds per square inch 
and not more than five (5) pounds per square inch, after installation, 
and backfill in accordance with 527 CMR 9.06 (20). 

e. Piping shall be tested in accordance with 527 CMR 9.06 (20) (a) before 
being covered, enclosed, or placed in use. 

f. Backfill material used to cover all new tank installations and repairs, 
shall be of the type and quality specified by the tank manufacturer's 
installation procedures, accepted engineering practices and the 
provisions of 527 CMR 9.06 (17) (b-d) , as amended; provided that the 
backfill material for FRP tanks shall be pea gravel or crushed stone and 
that the backfill material under all other tanks shall be either pea 
gravel or clean, non-corrosive sand, free of cinders, stones and any 
other foreign material, the material under the tank to be compacted and 
contoured to the shape of the tank before the tank is installed, the 
balance to be thoroughly compacted. 

g. Underground tanks that are to be located in areas subject to flooding 
or below the maximum water table elevation shall be anchored according 
to manufacturer's instructions. 

37.5.3. - Tank Location 

Underground tanks that are to be installed within 1,000 feet of a public water 
supply well shall submit, for review by the Fire Chief, Board of Health or its 
agent, and the local Water Commissioners or their agent, a plan outlining the 
procedures or devices, such as product sensors and/or area monitoring devices, 
to be used to prevent water supply contamination. The plan shall be endorsed 
by representatives of the three departments noted above prior to tank 
installation. Tanks currently within 1,000 feet of a public water supply well 
shall be upgraded to meet the provisions of Section 5.1 and 5.2 within 5 years 
of the acceptance of this by-law. 

SECTION 37.6. Leak Detection for Existing and New Tanks 
37.6.1. - Inventory Verification 

a. All underground tanks, except fuel-oil tanks solely connected with 
heating equipment, shall be installed and monitored for the prevention 
and detection of leakage of flammable and combustible liquids in 
accordance with the provisions of 527 CMR 5.05 (3). 

b. The daily -inventory records shall be shown to the Fire Chief prior to 
issuance of a permit or license renewal. (Refer to section (a) above). 



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c. The owner and operator shall participate in a program of regularly- 
scheduled inventory verification, at least once every two years, in 
accordance with 527 CMR 5.05 (3) (g) . The operator of tanks 20 years of 
age or older shall submit to the Fire Chief annually a report certifying 
that the inventory verification has been performed, stating the calculate 
gain/loss over the verification periods. 

d. The Fire Chief shall require the operator of an underground tank storage 
system to test the system for tightness, at the operator's expense, when 
accurate daily inventory records have not been maintained as specified in 
37.6.1. 

e. If daily inventory records indicate a loss of product in excess of 0.5 
percent of the volume of product used or sold, or an abnormal increase in 
the amount of water contained in the tank, steps shall be taken 
immediately in accordance with 527 CMR 5.05 (3) (e) to detect and stop 
the leak. The discrepancy shall be reported to the Fire Chief. 

37.6.2. - Tank Testing 

a. Unless the tank operator demonstrates to the Fire Chief and the Board of 
Health that his tank(s) are constructed of a material that will not 
corrode, has product sensors, or has been repaired or tested within the 
last year, underground tanks and piping shall be required, at the expense 
of the owner, to undergo one of the following tests within 60 days and 
annually thereafter: A Kent-Moore (Heath Petro-tite) test ; or a Sun-Mark 
leak-locator test; or the equivalent as determined by the Fire Chief. 

The Fire Chief shall be given at least 48 hours notice of time, date, and 
place of testing. Test results shall be submitted to the local Fire 
Chief . 

b. The waiver from 6.2 (a) may not be granted for a tank that is located 
within any of the areas specified in section 5.3. 

c. If flammable fluids or their vapors have been detected in neighboring 
structures, sewers, or wells on or off the property locations, the Fire 
Chief may require that any nearby tank, including underground residential 
tanks less than 1,000 gallons, be tested at the expense of each tank's 
owner . 

d. Any tank abandoned shall be removed from the premises and disposed of in 
an appropriate manner. 

e. Annual tank testing will not be required of tanks connected solely to 
heating systems unless deemed necessary by the Fire Chief. However, all 
tanks must be tested at the owner's expense during the 20th year after 
installation. 

f . Effective July 1, 1986 all tanks owned and operated by the Town of 
Wilmington must be tested annually in accordance with this by-law. 

SECTION 37.7. Procedure in Case of Spill or Leak (also, see Appendix A) 
37.7.1. - Leak Reporting 

Any owner /operator who is aware of a spill, abnormal loss of product stored 
underground, or abnormal gains of water in a tank, shall report such spill, 
loss or gain immediately to the Fire Chief. The Fire Chief shall be 
responsible for other notification, except as required by law and outlined in 
Appendix A. 



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37.7.2. - Equipment Replacement/Removal 



a. After a leak is confirmed, underground tanks (fittings and piping) 
shall be emptied immediately, and removed or repaired forthwith, under 
the direction of the Fire Chief. 

b. A leaking tank that is twenty years old or older or that falls under 
37.4.5. that does not comply with the design standards in section 37.5.1. 
(b) shall be removed and may not be repaired. A permit for its removal 
must be obtained in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 14 8, s. 3 8A. 

c. A leaking tank that is proven to be, by the owner or operator, less than 
twenty years old shall be repaired or removed. If the tank operator can 
show to the satisfaction of the Fire Chief that (in the case of steel 
tanks) the leak was from internal corrosion, and that the tank can be 
repaired so as not to pose a continuing threat to the soils and waters of 
the Commonwealth, considering at a minimum the corrosivity of the soil; 
tank age and external condition; techniques to be used for the repair; 
and the location of the tank, then the tank may be repaired. Operators 
of leaking FRP tanks must demonstrate to the Fire Chief that the tank can 
be repaired according to manufacturer's instructions. Operators who do 
not meet these requirements shall remove the tank. 

37.7.3. - If it is necessary to replace an underground steel tank that has 
developed a corrosion- induced leak, all other steel tanks at the facility of 
the same age or older, must be tested in accordance with section 37.6.2. of 
this by-law within 30 days of leak verification. 

SECTION 37.8: Administration 

37.8.1. - Board of Selectmen is chief licensing authority. 

37.8.2. - The provisions of this by-law shall be administered by the Fire 
Chief. 

37.8.3. - Variances from the specific requirements of this by-law may be 
authorized by the chief licensing authority after notice and a public hearing. 

37.8.4 - Licenses issued in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 148 s. 13 for 
underground tanks shall be renewed annually. Tank owners shall submit to the 
Fire Chief and the licensing authority (Board of Selectmen) a statement 
certifying satisfactory leak-detection results over the period of the permit 
(in accordance with s. 6.2 of this by-law), and inventory verification, at 
least 30 days before the issuance of a permit renewal for the time periods 
specified herein. Test results shall accompany the permit renewal application. 

37.8.5. - Fees necessary for the issuance and renewal of permits or licenses 
shall be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

37.8.6. - The Fire Chief may, at all reasonable times, and upon reasonable 
notice to the occupant of the premises, enter any premises, public or private, 
for the purpose of investigating, sampling or inspecting any record, condition, 
equipment, practice, or property relating to activities subject to this by-law, 
and may at any time and upon reasonable notice to the occupant of the premises 
enter such premises for the purpose of protecting the public health or safety, 
or to prevent damage to the environment. 



37.8.7. - Any operator who violates any provision of this by-law shall be 
subject to a fine of three hundred dollars for each offense. Each day during 
which such violation continues shall constitute a separate offense. This By- 
law may be enforced pursuant to Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 40, Sec. 21D, as amended, 
by a local police officer or any other officer having police powers. Upon 
request of the Board of Health and the Board of Selectmen, Town Counsel shall 
take such legal action as may be necessary to enforce this by-law. 

SECTION 37.9: Prohibited Uses 

All materials, which require a Material Safety Data Sheet, with the exception 
of gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil, will be prohibited from underground 
storage in the Town of Wilmington except as otherwise approved by the Fire 
Chief. 

SECTION 37.10: Validity and Severability 

The invalidity of one or more sections, subsections, sentences, clauses or 
provisions of this by-law shall not invalidate or impair this by-law as a whole 
or any other part or parts hereof . 

APPENDIX A 

FUEL-SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN: FUEL LEAKAGE OR SPILLS 

When fuel spills, it is important to follow proper procedures to ensure prompt 
and safe containment and cleanup of the material. Chapter 21 of the Mass. Gen. 
Laws, as amended by Chapter 705 of the Acts of 1979, give the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering (DEQE) sole authority to order 
or conduct spill containment and removal in or near any of the waters of the 
commonwealth. Groundwater is included in the definition of "Waters of the 
Commonwealth. " Local officials, therefore, are not authorized to clean up the 
spilled substance but can take steps to contain it, provided that DEQE is 
promptly notified and concurs with the proposed actions. As long as this is 
done "any person who gratuitously renders assistance at the request of a duly 
authorized officer in removing oil or hazardous material from the waters of the 
commonwealth, or adjoining shorelines, shall not be held liable, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, for civil damages as a result of 
any act of omission by him in removing such oil or hazardous material, except 
acts or omissions amounting to gross negligence or willful or wanton 
misconduct . " 

Prior to a Spill: 

1. Develop a standard procedure for reporting spills, such as the attached 
form, and distribute it to all concerned town departments, including the 
Fire Department, Board of Health, Police Department, Town Manager, Board 
of Selectmen, Conservation Commission, and the Hazardous Waste 
Coordinator (Director of Public Health) . 

2. Equip one or more town departments with oil -absorbent booms to be used to 
contain the spill. Train employees to use the booms. Or, in the 
alternative, the Town will employ the services of a certified hazardous 
waste clean-up operator. 

3 . Measures should be taken to ensure the safe and clean operation of gas 
stations and other fuel dispensers, particularly those in groundwater 
recharge areas and watersheds of surface water supplies. Applications for 
construction of new fuel storage facilities should be carefully reviewed, 
and permits should be issued only when compliance with strict safety 
standards is assured. 



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4. Because a fuel spill may involve several communities, determine who should 
be notified in the event of a threat to another community (e.g., Fire 
Department, Town Manager, etc.). 

When a Spill Occurs: 

5. Contact the local fire department, followed by all applicable town 
departments and the DEQE. Follow the latter 's instructions. 

6. Inspect the site of the spill and note the characteristics of the spilled 
substance. Do not come into contact with the substance or strike a match 
near the area . 

7. If the spill can be contained, place a row of oil -absorbent boom around 
it. 

8. Wait for the field representative from the DEQE to arrive, checking the 
spill periodically. 

Proposed Changes to the By-law. 

UNDERGROUND STORAGE 

SECTION 37.1. Authority 

This by-law is adopted by the Town of Wilmington under its home rule powers, 
its police powers to protect the public health, safety and welfare, and under 
powers authorized by Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 40, Sec. 21-21D and Ch. 14 8, Sec. 9. 

SECTION 37.2. Purpose 

The purposes of this by-law are, through regulations to specify the design, 
construction, installation, testing and maintenance of underground petroleum 
storage /hazardous substance facilities, to protect public health from the 
contamination of public and private water supplies due to leakage from such 
facilities, to protect the public safety from the dangers of fire and explosion 
associated with such leakage, and to protect the general welfare by preserving 
water supplies for present and future use. 

SECTION 37.3. Definitions 

37.3.1. - Underground tank shall mean any storage containment system (including 
pipe and fittings) in which any portion of the tank is below the ground but 
shall not include a freestanding container located within a building . 

37.3.2. - Fire Chief shall mean the Chief, or his designee, of the Fire 
Department in Wilmington. 

37.3.3. - Noncorrosive soil is soil that, when tested by a qualified 
Professional, is shown to have a resistivity greater than 10,000 ohm-cm, and 
that does not exhibit corrosive characteristics in a soil-chemistry analysis. 

37.3.4. - 100 year flood plain shall mean those areas as shown in the Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps for Wilmington under the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency's National Flood Insurance Program, or as defined in Section 6.2.1 of 
the zoning by-law. 

37.3.5. - Observation well: a dug or drilled cased well which can be used for 
detecting the presence of flammable or combustible liquids and which is drilled 
to a depth of approximately twenty- four (24) inches below the tank bottom and 
intercepting the water table . 



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37.3.6. - (Delete) Concrete Vault: means a vault constructed in accordance with 
figure No. 1, Section A, B or B-Typical; or, in the alternative, an acceptable 
engineered approved equivalent as approved by the Fire Chief . Add. Monitoring 
System - A full time system installed for the purpose of early detection of 
leaks, such as observation wells, visual or audible alarms, statistical 
inventory reconciliation (SIR) process conducted in connection with an in-tank 
monitoring system, or their equivalent as approved by the Fire Chief, minimum 
standards of monitoring systems shall detect a leak at a minimum rate of 0.20 
gallons per hour or more with the probability of detection of 0.95, and the 
probability of false alarm of 0.05. 

37.3.7. - Operator/Owner: means the lessee of a storage facility or the person 
or persons responsible for the daily operation of a storage facility. 

37.3.8. - Abnormal gain of water: means a gain in the water level inside any 
tank of more than one (1) inch in a twenty- four hour period during which no 
product has been added. 

37.3.9. - Inventory verification: includes procedures listed under section 
37.6.1 of this by-law and 527 CMR ( Code of Massachusetts Regulations) 5.06 . 

37.3.10. - Abandoned: means being out of service for a continuous period in 
excess of six months, in the case of a storage facility for which a license 
from the local licensing authority is required under the provisions of Mass. 
Gen. Laws Ch. 14 8, Sec. 13, as amended. 

37.3.11. - Cathodic protection: means a system that inhibits the corrosion of a 
tank or components through either the sacrificial anode or the impressed 
current method of creating a corrosion- inhibiting electrical current. 

37.3.12 - MSDS - Material Safety Data Sheet: a document identifying a toxic or 
hazardous substance and its manufacturer, and containing certain information 
relating to the risks associated with the substance and procedures for 
eliminating or minimizing those risks; the basic information document required 
by the Law. 

37.3.13. - Leakage or leak: means any uncontrolled movement, measurable by the 
tank monitoring system that can accurately detect a leak of 0.02 gallons per 
hour or more with probability of detection 0.95, and the probability of false 
alarm of . 05 . 

SECTION 37.4: Registration of tanks 

37.4.1. - Tank Registration: Every operator/owner of an underground tank must 
file a permit application with the Town Clerk within 90 days of the enactment 
of this by-law. 

37.4.2. - Notification of Fire Department: The Town Clerk must forthwith, give 
the Fire Chief a copy of the information filed for each tank that is registered 
according to section 37.4.1 of this by-law . The Fire Chief or his designee 
shall check this information against Fire Department records. He may require 
evidence of the date of purchase and installation of a tank if he determines in 
his sole discretion that there is any question concerning the age of a tank . 

37.4.3. - Tank Testing: Operators that are known to have underground storage 
tanks that did not register their tanks as required by section 37.4.1. of the 
by-law shall have such tanks tested in accordance with section 6.2 of this 
by-law or removed from the ground as directed by the Fire Chief . 



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37.4.4. - Any change in the information on the permit application must be 
reported to the Town Clerk and Fire Chief within 30 days of the change. 

37.4.5. - If no substantial evidence of the date of installation is supplied, 
than the tank shall be presumed to have been installed twenty years prior to 
the effective date of this by-law. 

SECTION 5: Standards Applicable to the Installation of New Tanks 

37.5.1. - Tank Design 

a . All tanks shall be constructed of double wall fiberglass reinforced 
plastic (FRP) or an acceptable engineered approved equivalent as approved 
by the Fire Chief. 

b. All piping shall be constructed of double wall non-corrodible materials 
such as FRP or its equivalent in accordance with 527 CMR 9.00. 

Eliminate - Current Section c - Replace with new Section c. 

c . All tanks and piping shall be equipped with a monitoring system in 
compliance with 527 CMR 9.05 and approved by the Fire Chief. 

d. All newly installed tanks shall be tested pursuant to the criteria for 
final or precision tank test described in NFPA 3 as amended published by 
the National Fire Protection Association. 

e. All tanks must be equipped with striker plates below openings used for 
product measurement or filling. 

f . When more than one (1) tank is installed, observation wells a minimum of 
two (2) inches in diameter shall be installed at two corners within tank 
hole excavation. If only one tank is installed, an observation well 
shall be installed at each end of the tank. 

37.5.2. - Tank Installation 

a. The Fire Chief shall inspect and approve underground tanks prior to their 
burial, in accordance with 527 CMR 9 . 05 (C) . 

b. (Delete) The Inspector of Buildings or his designee shall inspect and 
approve all concrete vaults. 

b . Tanks shall be installed in accordance with the manufacturer's 
installation techniques. Tanks that have reached the limit of the 
manufacturers' warranty shall be re-certified annually by the 
manufacturer. If re-certification is not received by the fire chief, 
the tanks shall be taken out of service immediately and removed from the 
ground within 90 days. 

c. New underground tanks shall be tested for tightness, hydrostatically , 
or with air pressure at not less than three (3) pounds per square inch 
and not more than five (5) pounds per square inch, after installation, 
and backfill in accordance with 527 CMR 9.05 (C) (5) . 

d. Piping shall be tested in accordance with 527 CMR 9 before being 
covered, enclosed, or placed in use. 

e. Backfill material used to cover all new tank installations and repairs, 
shall be of the type and quality specified by the tank manufacturer's 

. installation procedures, accepted engineering practices and the 
provisions of 527 CMR 9. 05 (C) (3) , as amended; provided that the backfill 

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material for FRP tanks shall be pea gravel or crushed stone and that the 
backfill material under all other tanks shall be either pea gravel or 
clean, non-corrosive sand, free of cinders, stones and any other foreign 
material, the material under the tank to be compacted and contoured to 
the shape of the tank before the tank is installed, the balance to be 
thoroughly compacted. 

f. Underground tanks that are to be located in areas subject to flooding 
or below the maximum water table elevation shall be anchored according 
to manufacturer's instructions. 

37.5.3. - Tank Location 

Underground tanks that are to be installed within 1,000 feet of a public water 
supply well shall submit, for review by the Fire Chief, Board of Health or its 
agent, and the local Water Commissioners or their agent, a plan outlining the 
procedures or devices, such as product sensors and/or area monitoring devices, 
to be used to prevent water supply contamination. The plan shall be endorsed 
by representatives of the three departments noted above prior to tank 
installation. Tanks currently within 1,000 feet of a public water supply well 
shall be upgraded to meet the provisions of Section 37.5.1 and 37.5.2 of this 
by-law within 5 years of the effective date of this Underground Storage Tank 
By-law as amended. 

SECTION 37.6. Leak Detection for Existing and New Tanks 

37.6.1. - Inventory Verification 

a. All underground tanks, except fuel-oil tanks solely connected with 
heating equipment, shall be installed and monitored for the prevention 
and detection of leakage of flammable and combustible liquids in 
accordance with the provisions of 527 CMR 5.06. 

b. The daily- inventory records shall be shown to the Fire Chief prior to 
issuance of a permit or license renewal. (Refer to section (a) above). 

c. The owner and operator shall participate in a program of regularly 
scheduled inventory verification, at least once every two years, in 
accordance with 527 CMR 5.05 (6) . The operator of tanks 2 years of age 
or older shall submit to the Fire Chief annually a report certifying that 
the inventory verification has been performed, stating the calculate 
gain/loss over the verification periods. 

d. The Fire Chief shall require the operator of an underground tank storage 
system to test the system for tightness, at the operator's expense, when 
accurate daily inventory records have not been maintained as specified in 
37.6.1. 

e. If daily inventory records indicate a loss of product in excess of 0.5 
percent of the volume of product used or sold, or an abnormal increase in 
the amount of water contained in the tank, steps shall be taken 
immediately in accordance with 527 CMR 5.05 (6) to detect and stop the 
leak. The discrepancy shall be reported to the Fire Chief. 

37.6.2. - Tank Testing 

a. Unless the tank operator demonstrates to the Fire Chief and the Board of 
Health that his tank(s) are constructed of a material that will not 
corrode, has product sensors, or has been repaired or tested within the 
last year, underground tanks and piping shall be required, at the expense 
of the owner, to undergo a tightness test within 60 days and annually 



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thereafter. The type of test shall be as determined by the Fire Chief. 
The Fire Chief shall be given at least 48 hours notice of time, date, and 
place of testing. Test results shall be submitted to the local Fire 
Chief. All tanks except those containing heating oil for consumptive use 
on the premises shall within two years of acceptance of this by-law meet 
the requirements for new installation. 

b. The waiver from Section 37.6.2(a) of this by-law may not be granted for a 
tank that is located within any of the areas specified in Section 37.5.3 
of this by-law. 

c. If flammable fluids or their vapors have been detected in neighboring 
structures, sewers, or wells on or off the property locations, the Fire 
Chief may require that any nearby tank, including underground residential 
tanks less than 1,000 gallons, be tested at the expense of each tank's 
owner . 

d. Any tank abandoned shall be removed from the premises and disposed of in 
an appropriate manner. 

e. Annual tank testing will not be required of tanks connected solely to 
heating systems unless deemed necessary by the Fire Chief. However, all 
tanks must be tested at the owner's expense during the 2 0th year after 
installation . 

f . Effective July 1, 1986 all tanks owned and operated by the Town of 
Wilmington must be tested annually in accordance with this by-law, 

SECTION 37.7. Procedure in Case of Spill or Leak (also, see Appendix A) 

37.7.1. - Leak Reporting 

Any owner/operator who is aware of a spill, abnormal loss of product stored 
underground, or abnormal gains of water in a tank, shall report such spill, 
loss or gain immediately to the Fire Chief. The Fire Chief shall be 
responsible for other notification, except as required by law and outlined in 
Appendix A. 

37.7.2. - Equipment Replacement/Removal 

a. After a leak is confirmed, underground tanks (fittings and piping) 
shall be emptied immediately, and removed or repaired forthwith, under 
the direction of the Fire Chief. 

b. Any leaking tank that is twenty years old or older or that falls under 
37.4.5. that does not comply with the design standards in section 37.5.1. 
(b) shall be removed and may not be repaired. A permit for its removal 
must be obtained in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 14 8, s. 3 8A. 

c. A leaking tank that is proven to be, by the owner or operator, less than 
twenty years old shall be repaired or removed. If the tank operator can 
show to the satisfaction of the Fire Chief that (in the case of steel 
tanks) the leak was from internal corrosion, and that the tank can be 
repaired so as not to pose a continuing threat to the soils and waters of 
the Commonwealth, considering at a minimum the corrosivity of the soil; 
tank age and external condition; techniques to be used for the repair; 
and the location of the tank, then the tank may be repaired. Operators 
of leaking FRP tanks must demonstrate to the Fire Chief that the tank can 
be repaired according to manufacturer's instructions. Operators who do 
not meet these requirements shall remove the tank. 



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Delete b and c in entirety. Add a new b 

b. Any leaking tank shall be removed forthwith. Product shall be removed 
immediately after notification by the Fire Department. 

37.7.3. - If it is necessary to replace an underground steel tank that has 
developed a corrosion- induced leak, all other steel tanks at the facility of 
the same age or older, must be tested in accordance with section 37.6.2. of 
this by-law within 30 days of leak verification. 

SECTION 37.8: Administration 

37.8.1. - Board of Selectmen is chief licensing authority. 

37.8.2. - The provisions of this by-law shall be administered by the Fire 
Chief. 

37.8.3. - Variances from the specific requirements of this by-law may be 
authorized by the chief licensing authority after notice and a public hearing. 

37.8.4 - Licenses issued in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 148 s. 13 for 
underground tanks shall be renewed annually. Tank owners shall submit to the 
Fire Chief and the licensing authority (Board of Selectmen) a statement 
certifying satisfactory leak-detection results over the period of the permit 
(in accordance with Section 37.6.2 of this by-law) , and inventory verification, 
at least 30 days before the issuance of a permit renewal for the time periods 
specified herein. Test results shall accompany the permit renewal application. 

37.8.5. - Fees necessary for the issuance and renewal of permits or licenses 
shall be set by the Board of Selectmen. 

37.8.6. - The Fire Chief may, at all reasonable times, and upon reasonable 
notice to the occupant of the premises, enter any premises, public or private, 
for the purpose of investigating, sampling or inspecting any record, condition, 
equipment, practice, or property relating to activities subject to this by-law, 
and may at any time and upon reasonable notice to the occupant of the premises 
enter such premises for the purpose of protecting the public health or safety, 
or to prevent damage to the environment. 

37.8.7. - Any operator who violates any provision of this by-law shall be 
subject to a fine of three hundred dollars for each offense. Each day during 
which such violation continues shall constitute a separate offense. This By- 
law may be enforced pursuant to Mass. Gen. Laws Ch. 40, Sec. 21D, as amended, 
by a local police officer or any other officer having police powers. Upon 
request of the Board of Health and the Board of Selectmen, Town Counsel shall 
take such legal action as may be necessary to enforce this by-law. 

SECTION 37.9: Prohibited Uses 

All materials, which require a Material Safety Data Sheet, with the exception 
of gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil, will be prohibited from underground 
storage in the Town of Wilmington except as otherwise approved by the Fire 
Chief. 

SECTION 37.10: Validity and Severability 

The invalidity of one or more sections, subsections, sentences, clauses or 
provisions of this by-law shall not invalidate or impair this by-law as a whole 
or any other part or parts hereof . 

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APPENDIX A - DELETE; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-law Study Committee, reads the same 
as the above article. Fire Chief Daniel Stewart spoke on the article, 
our current by-law was approved at Town Meeting in 1986 and approved by 
the Attorney General. Underground Storage By-law does three things: 1. 
Oversees the installation of new underground fuel tanks and tanks that 
store hazardous materials; 2. Regulates tanks when in use; and 3. 
Regulates tank removal. The regulations have changed since our by-law 
was written. What we have in existence needs to be updated. This by-law 
gives the Fire Department the tool to help regulate flammable materials 
in Town. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 34 . (drawn as #8) To see if the town will vote to amend the 
"Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington", as follows: 

Proposed Change to the By-law. 

Add New Section 4 7 to Chapter 5 

Chapter 5, Section 47 
ALARM SYSTEMS 

47.1 Definitions 

For the purpose of these regulations, the following definitions shall apply: 

(a) Alarm Device: Any device which when activated by a criminal act, fire 
or other emergency calling for police/fire department response: 

(1) Transmits a signal to police/fire headquarters; (2) transmits a 
signal to a person who relays the information to police/fire 
headquarters; or (3) produces an audible or visible signal to which the 
police/fire department is expected to respond. Excluded from this 
definition and the scope of these regulations are devices which are 
designed to alert or signal only persons within the premises in which 
the device is installed. 

(b) Alarm User: The owner of any premises on which an alarm device is 
used: provided that an occupant who expressly accepts responsibility 
for an alarm device by registration pursuant to Section 47.4 shall be 
deemed the alarm user. 

(c) Automatic Dial Alarm: A telephone device or attachment that 
mechanically or electronically selects a telephone line to police/fire 
headquarters and reproduces a pre-recorded voice message to report a 
criminal act, or other emergency calling for police department 
assistance . 

(d) Contractor : Any firm or corporation in the business of supplying 
and/or installing alarm devices or servicing the same. 

(e) False Alarm: Any activation of an alarm to which the police/fire 
department responds and which is not caused by a criminal act, fire or 
other emergency, except an activation caused by (1) malfunction of 
telephone company equipment or lines off premises as verified by 
monitoring facilities at police/fire headquarters, or (2) power failure 
as verified by the administrator. A series of such activations 
attributable to the same cause and occurring under circumstances beyond 
the control of the responsible alarm user shall not be deemed a false 
alarm. 



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47 . 2 



Administration : 



(a) There shall be in the town, an administrator for alarm devices who 
shall have the powers and duties granted under this by-law. 

(b) The Chief of Police/Fire Chief or his designee shall be the 
administrator of these regulations as to their respective department's 
involvement . 

47.3 Registration Required: 

(a) Each alarm user shall register his alarm device or devices with the 

administrator prior to use; provided that the alarm devices in use as 
of the effective date of these regulations may be registered no later 
than sixty (60) days from such date. 

47.4 Registration Procedure: 

(a) Alarm device registration shall be accomplished by filling out a form 
provided by the administrator to include such information concerning 
the identity of the prospective alarm user, the identity of the alarm 
user's contractor, if any, and the nature of the proposed communication 
method, as the administrator may require. 

(b) It shall be the responsibility of each alarm user to notify the 
administrator in writing of changes in registration information. 

47.5 Confidential Information: 

All information in the possession of the administrator, for alarm devices 
concerning particular alarm users and particular communication method shall 
be confidential and shall not be divulged without the written consent of the 
alarm user or users concerned. 

47.6 Exterior Audible Devices : 

Unless required by law, no alarm device, which produces an exterior audible 
signal shall be installed unless its operation is automatically restricted to 
a maximum of twenty (20) minutes. Any alarm device in use as of the 
effective date of these regulations, must comply with this section within one 
hundred eighty (180) days of such date. 

47.7 Reporting False Alarms: 

Police/Fire personnel shall report false alarms to the administrator. 

47.8 False Alarm Charges: 

(a) When the administrator determines that the police/fire department has 
responded to a false alarm, the administrator shall impose a charge on 
the responsible alarm user according to the following schedule: 

• for the first three (3) false alarm responses within the calendar 
year - No Charge . 

• for the fourth and subsequent such false alarm response - $25.00 
each alarm. 

(b) In addition to the provision of Section 47.8(a) there shall be no 
charge for the first false alarm occurring within one month after 
installation of an alarm device and such false alarm shall not be 
considered for determining charges in accordance with the schedule set 
forth in Section 47.8(a). 

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47 . 9 



Notification and Appeal : 



(a) False Alarm Charges: 

1. The administrator shall notify the responsible alarm user of any 
false alarm charge by mail. Within thirty (30) days after the 
mailing of such notice the alarm user may file with the 
administrator, information to show that the alarm was not a false 
alarm within the meaning of these regulations. 

2. The administrator shall consider such information, affirm or rescind 
the false alarm charge, and notify the alarm user of his decision by 
mail, within thirty (30) days after the mailing of such notice. 

47.10 Charges and Fees Paid into General Fund: 

Charges for false alarms will be collected by the administrator and placed in 
the general fund. 

47.11 Penalty for Certain Violations: 

Any person who performs or causes to be performed any of the following acts 
shall be subject to a fine of up to one hundred ($100.00) dollars for each 
such act : 

(a) Intentional causing of a false alarm. 

(b) Failure to register an alarm device or give notice of changes in 
registration information as required by this by-law. 

(c) Use of automatic dial alarm or an exterior audible alarm device in 
violation of the provisions of this by-law. 

47.12 Town Assumes No Responsibility: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of these regulations, the town, its 
departments, officers, agents and employees shall be under no obligation 
whatsoever concerning the adequacy or maintenance of any alarm device or of 
the alarm monitoring facilities at police/fire headquarters. No liability 
whatsoever is assumed for the failure of such alarm devices or monitoring 
facilities, or for failure to respond to alarms for any other act or omission 
in connection with such alarm devices. Each alarm user shall be deemed to 
hold harmless the town, its departments, officers, agents and employees for 
liability in connection with the alarm user's alarm device. 

47.13 Exceptions : 

The provisions of these regulations shall not apply to alarm devices on 
premises owned or controlled by the town, nor to alarm devices installed in a 
motor vehicle or trailer: or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Spencer, Chairman By-Law Study Committee, reads the 
same as above. He stated that in 2003 Police, Fire, and Ambulances 
responded to 1,737 false alarms from homes and businesses. In addition 
there were 1,194 false 911 calls for a variety of reasons. Residents 
would be allowed three false alarms before fine of $25.00 is charged. 
Residents would also have the right of appeal to Police and Fire Chief. 
We need to reduce the potential for tragedy as all this emergency 
equipment answers each call. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 35. (drawn as #9) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Conservation Commission. Said parcels are described as Map 10 Parcels 27, 
35, 44, 44A, Map 11 Parcel 19A, Map 27 Parcels 8, 10, Map 29 Parcel IIU, Map 
31 Parcel 13, Map 33 Parcel 30, Map 41 Parcels 81, 97, 98, Map 45 Parcels 95, 
96, 97, Map 50 Parcel 33, Map 51 Parcels 79B, 79C, 79D, 80, Map 65 Parcel 4, 
Map 66 Parcel 72, Map 81 Parcels 14B, 14C and Map 88 Parcel 32; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Morris, Chairman Conservation Commission, "I move that 
the Board of Selectmen be authorized to transfer the care, custody, 
management and control of certain parcels of land owned by the Town of 
Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation Commission. Said 
parcels are described as Map 10 Parcels 27, 35, 44, 44A, Map 11 Parcel 
19A, Map 27 Parcels 8, 10, Map 29 Parcel IIU, Map 31 Parcel 13, Map 33 
Parcel 30, Map 41 Parcels 81, 97, 98, Map 45 Parcels 95, 96, 97, Map 50 
Parcel 33, Map 51 Parcels 79B, 79C, 79D, 80, Map 65 Parcel 4, Map 66 
Parcel 72, Map 81 Parcels 14B, 14C and Map 88 Parcel 32." He stated 
all of these parcels are wetlands or adjacent to conservation land. 
The Moderator noted that James Morris is retiring from the Conservation 
Commission and thanked him for his many years of dedicated service. 
Finance Committee recommends approval . Planning Board recommends 
approval because these parcels are environmentally significant. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 174 No 1. 

ARTICLE 36 . (drawn as #18) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law of the Town of Wilmington by taking the following actions: 

1) Amend Section 6.1 Nonconforming Uses & Structures by deleting the 
existing section 6.1 and substituting the following provisions: 



6.1 



6.1.2.1 



6.1.3 



6.1.4 



Nonconforming Uses and Structures 

Applicability . This Zoning By-law shall not apply to structures or 
uses lawfully in existence or lawfully begun, or to a building or 
special permit issued before the first publication of notice of the 
public hearing required by M.G.L. c. 40A, s. 5 subsequent to which 
this Zoning Bylaw, or any relevant part thereof, was adopted. 
However, in the case of the issuance of a building or special 
permit, construction or operation thereunder shall conform to the 
provisions of this Bylaw unless the construction or use has 
commenced within a period of not more than six months after the 
issuance of the permit and, in cases involving construction, such 
construction is continued through to completion expeditiously. Such 
prior, lawfully existing nonconforming uses and structures may 
continue, provided that no modification of the use or structure is 
accomplished, unless authorized hereunder. 

Nonconforming Uses . The Board of Appeals may issue a special permit 
to change or extend a nonconforming use only if it determines that 
such change or extension shall not be substantially more detrimental 
than the existing nonconforming use to the neighborhood. The Board 
of Appeals shall not allow an existing nonconforming use to be 
changed to another nonconforming use. 

Nonconforming Structures . The Board of Appeals may issue a special 
permit to allow the reconstruction, extension, alteration, or change 
of a nonconforming structure, other than a nonconforming single or 
two family residential structure, only after it determines that such 
reconstruction, extension, alteration, or change will not be 
substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing 
nonconforming structure. 



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6.1.5 Variance Required. The reconstruction, extension or structural 

change of a nonconforming structure in such a manner as to increase 
an existing nonconformity, or create a new nonconformity, including 
the extension of an exterior wall at or along the same nonconforming 
distance within a required yard, shall require the issuance of a 
variance from the Board of Appeals; provided, however, that this 
provision shall not apply to nonconforming single and two family 
residential structures, which shall be governed by Section 6.1.6 
below. 



6.1.6 Pre-Existing Nonconforming Single and Two Family Residential 
Structures . Pre-Existing Nonconforming single and two family 
residential structures may be reconstructed after voluntary 
demolition, extended, altered, or structurally changed upon the 
issuance of a building permit after a determination by the Inspector 
of Buildings that such proposed reconstruction, extension, 
alteration, or change does not increase the nonconforming nature of 
said structure. The following three (3) situations shall be deemed 
to not increase the nonconforming nature of the structure and shall 
be used in the determination by the Inspector of Buildings. All 
other situations including, without limitation, the extension of an 
exterior wall, vertically or horizontally, at or along the same 
nonconforming distance within a required yard, shall be deemed to 
increase the nonconforming nature of the structure and shall require 
the issuance of a special permit pursuant to Section 6.1.6.4. 



6.1.6.1 Any reconstruction, extension, alteration or change to a 
structure which complies with all current setback, yard, 
building coverage, and building height requirements but is 
located on a lot with insufficient area or insufficient 
width, where the reconstruction, extension or alteration 
or change will also comply with all of said current 
requirements . 

6.1.6.2 Any reconstruction, extension, alteration or change to a 
structure which complies with all current setback, yard, 
building coverage, and building height requirements but is 
located on a lot with insufficient frontage, where the 
reconstruction, extension, alteration or change will also 
comply with all of said current requirements. 

6.1.6.3 Any reconstruction, extension, alteration or change to a 
structure which encroaches upon one or more required yard 
or setback areas, where the reconstruction, extension, 
alteration or change will comply with all current setback, 
yard, building coverage and building height requirements. 



6.1.6.4 In the event that the Inspector of Buildings determines 

that the nonconforming nature of a single or two family 
residential structure would be increased by the proposed 
reconstruction, extension, alteration, or change, the 
Board of Appeals may, by special permit, allow such 
reconstruction, extension, alteration, or change where it 
determines that the proposed modification will not be 
substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood than 
the existing nonconforming structure. 



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6 • 1 • 7 Abandonment . A nonconforming use or structure which has been 

abandoned, discontinued or not used shall thereafter conform to the 
requirements of this Bylaw and the nonconforming use or structure 
may not be resumed. 

6.1.7.1 A nonconforming use or structure shall be considered 
abandoned, without limitation, when a nonconforming use or 
structure has been replaced by a conforming use or 
structure . 

6.1.7.2 A nonconforming use or structure, other than a single or 
two family residential structure, shall be considered 
discontinued or not used when not used for a period of two 
years or more. 

6.1.8 Reconstruction after Catastrophe. A nonconforming structure which 
has been damaged by fire, flood or similar disaster may be restored 
provided that the owner shall apply for a building permit and start 
operations for reconstruction of said premises within two years 
after such catastrophe, and provided that the building (s) as 
reconstructed shall be only as great in volume and footprint as the 
original nonconforming structure. In any other circumstance, a 
special permit shall be required from the Board of Appeals. 

6.1.9 Reversion to Nonconformity. No nonconforming use shall, if changed 
to a conforming use, revert to a nonconforming use; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Sorrentino, Chairman, Planning Board, reads the 
same as the above article. Planning Board recommends approval of this 
article, which will simplify the Board of Appeals process by allowing 
the Inspector of Buildings to issue a permit when the non- conforming 
nature of a structure is not increased. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 37. (drawn as #26) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Manager or other appropriate designee, to execute program documentation 
on behalf of the Town, including acquisition of interests in real estate in 
certain properties in connection with implementing the Town's Community 
Development Block Grant Program. Such acquisition shall be subject to 
ratification at a subsequent town meeting; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Frank West, "I move that the following By-law be adopted as 
Chapter 3, Section 2 9 of the Revised By-laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington: 

Section 29: Community Development Housing Rehabilitation Program. 

The Town Manager or his designee is authorized to execute program 
documentation of behalf of the Town, including acquisition of interests 
in real estate in certain properties in connection with implementing 
the Town's Community Development Block Grant Program; the acquisition 
of such interests in real estate shall be subject to ratification at a 
subsequent town meeting." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 38. (drawn as #23) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that 
Michael R. Baker be allowed to take the civil service Fire Fighters 
examination notwithstanding the provision of any general or special law or 
rules or regulations to the contrary regulating the maximum age of applicants 
for appointments as a fire fighter to be eligible for appointment as a fire 
fighter in said town and provided he meets all other requirements, he shall 
be eligible for certification and appointment to the Fire Department of the 
Town of Wilmington subject to the appointment of the appointing authority; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion was read by Town Moderator and reads the same as above article. 
Mr. Steve Costa asked if this was Michael Baker who was a member of the 
School Committee. The answer was yes. Motion seconded and voted Yes 
16 No 56. Article defeated. 

ARTICLE 39 . (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that Joseph 
A. Vieira, III be allowed to take the civil service Fire Fighters examination 
notwithstanding the provision of any general or special law or rules or 
regulations to the contrary regulating the maximum age of applicants for 
appointments as a fire fighter to be eligible for appointment as a fire 
fighter in said town and provided he meets all other requirements, he shall 
be eligible for certification and appointment to the Fire Department of the 
Town of Wilmington subject to the appointment of the appointing authority; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Charles Rooney, "I move to see if the town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to 
authorize that Joseph A. Vieira, III be allowed to take the civil 
service Fire Fighters examination notwithstanding the provision of any 
general or special law or rules or regulations to the contrary 
regulating the maximum age of applicants for appointments as a fire 
fighter to be eligible for appointment as a fire fighter in said town 
and provided he meets all other requirements, he shall be eligible for 
certification and appointment to the Fire Department of the Town of 
Wilmington subject to the appointment of the appointing authority." 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

Article 40. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote that Chestnut Street 
beginning at Burlington Avenue and proceeding for a distance of approximately 
two and three-tenths miles (2 3/10) to the North Woburn line, also Hillside 
Way (4/10) of a mile approximately to the Burlington line be designated as 
Scenic Streets under Chapter 40, 15C of the Massachusetts General Laws and 
that the Town vote to accept Chapter 40, Section 15C of Massachusetts General 
Laws also that Chestnut Street and Hillside Way will be designated as Scenic 
Roads and protected as such; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Charles Rooney reads the same as the above article. This 
article is proposed to adopt the state scenic roads law, to preserve 
this historic road, which is the site of Old South School, Baldwin 
Apple Monument and Bell Farm. Residents asked many questions about the 
effect this acceptance would have on residents and the town's ability 
to do work. Town Counsel Paul DeRensis recommended the town write a 
comprehensive by-law to clarify the law including definitions and 
regulations for people to follow. Finance Committee and Planning Board 
recommend approval. After an hour discussion, the article was 
withdrawn by Charles Rooney. 



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ARTICLE 41 . (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcel of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen 
of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying 
the same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further 
that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such 
interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and interest is described as Map 11, Parcel 
24; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Lawrence Donovan, the petitioner, stated he would like to 
purchase this property because there is a problem with his swimming 
pool and he needs the land. He has no intention of clearing for any 
other use, just to enhance this property. Town Manager has declared 
this land surplus to needs of town. Assessor has declared a fair 
market value of $5,000. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Planning Board recommends approval. This is a 5,000 square foot parcel 
of land that will "square off" an existing lot. Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 42. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of 
land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen 
of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying 
the same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further 
that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such 
interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 51, 
Parcel 68; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by John McGinn, petitioner reads the same as above article. 
Petitioner wishes to enhance his property. This purchase would make 
the lot less non-conforming. Town Manager has declared this land 
surplus to needs of the town. Assessor has set $2,875 as the fair 
market value. Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board 
recommends approval. This site is currently being used by the abutter 
as part of his yard. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 43 . (drawn as #27) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody and control of certain parcels of land owned by 
the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation Commission. 
Said parcels are described as: Map 18, Parcels 30, 34, 35, 36, 36A, 37, 26, 
26B; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Bob Dodge, John Street, reads the same as above. Placing 
this land in care of Conservation Commission would protect the area. 
Suzanne Sullivan stated this is the vision of the Master Plan and Open 
Space Committee. We need to protect upland areas, also. This is 
perfect piece of land for recreation. Ray Forrest of Housing 
Partnership requested it not be turned over to Conservation until it 
can be determined that we have no other interest in it. Town Manager 
stated this article includes additional parcels from Article 25. 
Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Planning Board did not 
recommend sale of these parcels, it also does not recommend that the 
parcels be transferred to Conservation Commission, which would preclude 
other options in the future. Motion seconded and so voted, Yes 59 No 
41. Article fails for lack of 2/3rds vote. 

-205- 




ARTICLE 44. (drawn as #17) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from General Industrial (GI) to Central Business (CB) the following 
described parcel of land: 

A certain parcel of land together with the buildings thereon, situated at 355 
Middlesex Avenue, in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts being shown 
as Lot A on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Property of 
Wilmington Development Co., Inc.", dated October 9, 1962, A.L. Savignac, 
C.E., recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds in Book of Plans 97, Plan 
126 and bounded and described as follows: 

Westerly by Middlesex Avenue, by three lines together measuring four 

hundred eighty-seven and 48/100 (487.48) feet; 
Northerly by land of owners unknown, by two lines together measuring 

two hundred seventy and 63/100 (270.63) feet; 
Northeasterly by land of Boston & Main R.R., as shown on said plan, five 

hundred ten and 95/100 (510.95) feet; 
Southerly by Lot D and part of Lot C, as shown on said plan, by two 

lines together measuring two hundred fifty-four and 40/100 

(254.40) feet; 

Easterly by part of said Lot C, as shown on the said plan, nine and 

81/100 (9.81) feet; and 
Southerly again by part of Lot C and by Lot B, as shown on said plan, 

two hundred ninety-two and 41/100 (292.41) feet. 

For Petitioner's title, see Deed of Bayfield Development Company, Inc. dated 
April 1, 1996 and recorded at the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
in Book 7 951, Page 280. 

The above -referenced property is also shown as Parcel 31 on Assessor's Map 
79, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Attorney Robert Peterson, "I move that the Zoning By-laws and 
associated Map of the Town of Wilmington be hereby amended by voting to 
rezone from General Industrial (GI) to Central Business (CB) the 
following described parcel of land: 

A certain parcel of land together with the buildings thereon, situated 
at 355 Middlesex Avenue, in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts 
being shown as Lot A on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, 
Mass., Property of Wilmington Development Co., Inc.", dated October 9, 
1962, A.L. Savignac C.E., recorded with Middlesex North District Deeds 
in Book of Plans 97, Plan 126 and bounded and described as follows: 



Westerly by Middlesex Avenue, by three lines together 

measuring four hundred eighty-seven and 48/100 
(487.48) feet; 

Northerly by land of owners unknown, by two lines together 

measuring two hundred seventy and 63/100 (270.63) 
feet; 

Northeasterly by land of Boston & Main R.R., as shown on said plan, 

five hundred ten and 95/100 (510.95) feet; 
Southerly by Lot D and part of Lot C, as shown on said plan, by 

two lines together measuring two hundred fifty-four 

and 40/100 (254.40) feet; 
Easterly by part of said Lot C, as shown on the said plan, 

nine and 81/100 (9.81) feet; and 
Southerly again by part of Lot C and by Lot B, as shown on said 

plan, two hundred ninety-two and 41/100 (292.41) 

feet . 



-206- 



For Petitioner's title, see Deed of Bayfield Development Company, Inc. 
dated April 1, 1996 and recorded at the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 7951, Page 280. The above-referenced 
property is also shown as Parcel 31 on Assessor's Map 79." 

Mr. Peterson stated this property is located at 355 Middlesex Avenue 
known as the Channel Building. It is owned by Paul Kneeland, 444 
Middlesex Avenue. The proposed business design will have a New England 
character. It is actually down zoning and better use of the property. 
This proposal will rezone from General Industrial to Central Business. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends 
approval for the following reasons: 

1. The proposed rezoning would allow the proposed mixed-use 
development and enhance the character of North Wilmington. 

2. Providing retail uses and services could enable residents in the 
area to walk and reduce driving. 

3. The proposed development would add amenities to the area. 

Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 83 No 7. Article is approved. 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #19) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R60) to Residential 20 (R20) the following 
described parcels of land; lots 4C (25,000 square feet) and 4E (10,000 square 
feet) (Note: These two lots are currently combined as lot) on Assessor's Map 
11, a portion of which, to possibly be used to support the construction of 1 
(one) single family dwelling and associated septic system on the combined 
lots of 4 and 4D. 

The land with the buildings and improvements thereon situated on Dorchester 
Street in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, being Lots 6 through 
12 inclusive and Lots 30 through 36 inclusive, in Block 19, shown on plan 
entitled: "Shawsheen Pines" Billerica-Wilmington, Massachusetts, dated April 
1927, Henry F. Bryand & Son, Surveyors, owned and developed by L . C. Morang, 
Co., which is recorded with said deeds at the Plan Book 50, Plan 61. 

For Petitioner's Title, see foreclosure deed recorded at the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book B05990, Pages P091 - P095, dated 06/25/92; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. McManus reads the same as above article. He seeks 
to rezone and combine lots and build one single family home. Other 
lots in the area contain only 10,000 square feet. Neighbors in area 
all support this rezoning. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Planning Board recommends approval, the other lots in the area 
generally range from 10,000 square feet to 30,000 square feet. The 
proposed rezoning would be consistent with the area. Motion seconded 
and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 46. (drawn as #29) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R60) to Residential 20 (R20) the following 
described parcels of land: lots 4 (12,469 square feet) and 4D (12,469 square 
feet) on Assessor's Map 11, to be combined to create one single lot of 
approximately 24,938 square feet for the construction of 1 (one) single 
family dwelling and associated septic system. 



-207- 



The land in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, situated between 
Dorchester Street, Third Avenue and Edgeworth Street, being Lots 25 through 
29 inclusive (Lot 4) and Lots 1 through 5 inclusive (Lot 4D) , in block 19, 
shown on plan entitled: "Shawsheen Pines" Billerica-Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, dated April 1927, Henry F. Bryant & Son, Surveyors, owned and 
developed by L . C. Morang Co., which is recorded with said deeds at the Plan 
Book 50, Plan 61. 

For Petitioner's Title, see Deed recorded at the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 14246, Page 066 for Lot 4D and Book 14246, Page 068 
for Lot 4; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. McManus reads the same as above article. As in Article 
45, these lots are needed to enable him to build a single-family home. 
He thanked Town Meeting for their support on Article 45. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends approval. 
The other lots in the area generally range from 10,000 square feet to 
30,000 square feet. The proposed rezoning would be consistent with the 
area. Motion seconded and voted, unanimously. 

The attendance at Town Meeting was one hundred ninety-nine (199) and forty- 
one (41) non-voters. The meeting adjourned at 5:20 P.M. 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 2 004 



Total 

Appropriation By Transfer By Taxation 

520,000 520,000 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 2005 
Total 

Appropriation By Transfer By Taxation 



SCHOOL BUDGET 27,719,229 1,000,000 26,719,229 

MUNICIPAL BUDGET 29,107,443 1,124,347 27,983,096 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 1,002,700 493,000 509,700 

WARRANT ARTICLES 18, 750 18 , 750 

SUB BUDGET 57,848,122 2,617,347 55,230,775 

STATUTORY CHARGES 5, 306, 159 376, 161 4 , 929, 998 

TOTAL 63,154,281 2,993,508 60,160,773 



CEMETERY SALES 3 5,000 

CEMETERY INTEREST 15,000 

WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 493,508 

FREE CASH 2,225,000 

CAPITAL STABILIZATION 225 , 000 

TOTAL 2,993,508 



-208- 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 2, 2004 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in the 
State Election to vote at Precinct 1 & 2 - West Intermediate School, Precinct 
3 & 4 - Wildwood Street School and Precinct 5 & 6 - Town Hall, 121 Glen Road, 
on the second day of November, 2004 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the 
following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political 
parties for the following officers: 



Electors of President and Vice President 

Representative in Congress 

Councillor 

Senator in General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Sheriff 



Statewide 

6™ Congressional District 
5™ District 
1^'^ Essex & Middlesex 
19™ Middlesex District 
21^*^ Middlesex District 
Middlesex County 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 

Badnarik and Campagna -Libertarian 

Bush and Cheney - Republican 

Cobb and LaMarche - Green-Rainbow 

Kerry and Edwards - Democrat 

Nader and Came jo 

Others 

Blanks 

Total 



57 
316 

26 
840 

17 
9 

21 



11,286 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (6*"' Congressional District ) 

John F. Tierney - Democrat 

Stephen P. O'Malley, Jr. - Republican 

Others 

Blanks 

Total 



7, 047 
3,435 
5 

799 
11, 286 



COUNCILLOR 



■th 



District , 



Mary-Ellen Manning - Democrat 

Others 

Blanks 

Total 



7,431 
26 
3, 829 
11, 286 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (1^*^ Essex & Middlesex ) 

Bruce E. Tarr - Republican 

Paul M. McGeary - Democrat 

Others 

Blanks 

Total 



5, 911 
4 , 340 

7 

1, 028 
11, 286 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (19™ Middlesex -Prec.l, 2, 4-6) 



James R. 
Others 
Blanks 
Total 



Miceli - Democrat 



7 , 508 
46 
1, 835 
9,389 



-209- 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 2l" Middlesex Precinct 3 ) 
Charles A. Murphy - Democrat 
John J. Cirigano - Republican 



998 
732 



Others 
Blanks 
Total 





167 
1, 897 



SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
James V. DiPaola 



8, 023 
31 



Others 
Blanks 
Total 



3,232 
11, 286 



The three polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. The 
election was an extremely busy day, 11,286 of our registered voters came to 
the polls. This represents 75% of our 15,048 registered voters. The fact 
that we had new voting equipment and procedures, the day went very smoothly. 
Thanks to all the people who assisted the Town Clerk in the voting process. 
My office staff, Carolyn Kenney and Phyllis Vieira, our wonderful election 
workers, the Board of Registrars, Town Manager, Town Hall Staff, Department 
of Public Buildings, Department of Public Works, Police Department, School 
Department and our local Post Office. 



-210- 



Directory of Officials - January 1, 2005 



Board of Selectmen 



Michael V. McCoy, Chairman 
Raymond N. Lepore 
Frank J. West 
Suzanne M. Sullivan 
Michael J. Newhouse 



2005 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2007 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



2006 



School Committee 



Joan M. Duffy, Chairman 

Marilyn J. Lamson, Vice Chairman 

Margaret A. Kane, Secretary 

Theresa L. Buonopane 

Michael R. Baker 

Mark DiGiovanni 

Daniel M. Ardito 



2007 
2005 
2007 
2005 
2006 
2006 
2007 



Superintendent of Schools 



William H. McAlduff, Jr, 



Finance Committee 



John F. Doherty, III, Chairman 
John M. Walsh, Vice Chairman 
Richard K. Hayden, Secretary 
Jeffrey A. Linehan 
Robert P. Palmer 
Bernard P. Nally, Jr. 
William J. Wallace 
William A. Cole 
Victoria L. Ellsworth 



2005 
2007 
2006 
2005 
2005 
2006 
2006 
2007 
2007 



-211- 



Boards. Committees & Commissiomis 2004 



Term 
Expires 

2005 
2006 
2007 
2005 
2005 
2005 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals, Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 
Robert L. Doucette 
Edward P. Loud 
Karl I. Sagal, Associate 
Joseph M. Steen, Associate 
Martha K. Stevenson, Associate 

Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor 
Anthony E. Krzeminski 
Roger J. Lessard 

By-Law Study Committee 

Robert H. Spencer, Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Robert J. Cain 

Scott C. Garrant 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 

Walter J. Kaminski 

M. Ronald Mendes 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Frank J. West, Sel . Liaison 

Kathleen M. Scanlon, Ex-Officio 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Wayne Aruda 
Donna Gacek 
Louise Leland 
A. Quincy Vale 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

H. Elizabeth White, Chairperson 2007 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr . Sec. 2005 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 2006 

Margaret A. St. Onge 2006 

Adele C. Passmore, Publicity 2007 

Cemetery Commission 

Marjorie E. MacDonald, Chairman 2005 

Judith A. Simmons 2 006 

Cynthia A. McCue 2007 



Community Advisory Panel 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Joseph J. Balliro, Jr. 

Kathleen M. Barry 

Betty M. Bigwood 

Dennis B. Cataldo 

John Ciriello 

Deborah L. Duggan 

Gregory P. Erickson 

George G. Lingenf elter , III 

Linda Raymond 

Michael Raymond 

Suzanne M. Sullivan 

Judith A. Waterhouse 

Jane A. Williams-Vale 

Michael J. Woods 

Conservation Commission 

Judith A. Waterhouse, Chairman 

Richard J. Patterson, V. Chmn. 

Lisa A. Brothers 

Beverly A. Shea 

Mark Brazell 

Mario Marchese 

Frank J. Ingram 

Disabilities, Commission on 

Phyllis P. Genetti, Chairman 

George B. O'Connell 

Frank A. Botte 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 

Selectman Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 

John J. King, Chairman 
Rosemary K. Cross, V. Chmn. 
Joseph A. Paglia 
Albert J. LaValle 
Frank J. Ratto 
Joseph C. Filipowicz 
Mary Smith 

Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
Gregory P. Erickson 
Roger J. Lessard 
Michael Morris 
Donald N. Onusseit 
Daniel W. Paret 
Robert H. Spencer, Jr. 
Daniel R. Stewart 
Michael J. Woods 



2007 
2007 
2005 
2005 
2006 
2006 
2007 



2005 
2006 
2007 
2007 



2007 
2005 
2005 
2006 
2006 
2007 
2007 



-212- 



Boards. Committees & Commissions 



Term 

Expires 

Health, Board of 

Elizabeth E. Sabounjian, Chmn. 2005 

Jane A. Williams -Vale , V. Chmn. 2006 

James A. Ficociello 2007 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 2005 

Gerald R. Duggan 2005 

James T. Murray 2005 

William J. Campbell 2006 

Terry McDermott 2006 

Bonny A. Smith 2007 

Audrey E. Riddle 2007 

Housing Authority 

Charles Fiore, Jr., Chairman 2006 

Alfred Meegan, V.Chmn/St. Appt . 2008 

Robert C. DiPasquale, Secretary 2008 

Arthur Hicks, Treasurer 2005 

Marilyn A. Cox, Vic Treas . 2007 

Housing Partnership 

Raymond G. Forest, Chairman 2005 

Charles E. Boyle, V. Chairman 2005 

Marilyn A. Cox 2005 

Gregory P. Erickson 2005 

Cynthia A. McCue 2005 

Kathleen M. Scanlon 2005 

Lester E. White 2005 
Michael A. Caira, Town Manager 
Suzanne Sullivan, Sel . Liason 

Library Trustees 

Joan S. Grady, Chairman 2006 

Karen E. Campbell, Vice Chairman 2006 



Term 

Expires 



James F. Banda 

Edward H. Jones 

Mary J. Deislinger 

L. Barbara Hooper 

Anne Buzzell, Trustee Emeritus 

Master Plan Committee 

Raymond G. Forest, Chairman 

Kenneth J. Lifton, Vice Chairman 

Michael R. Baker 

Karen E. Campbell 

Susanne L. Clarkin 

Stephen J. Costa 

Rosemary K. Cross 

Robert C. DiPasquale 

William F. C. Gately 

Carolyn R. Harris 

Arthur Hayden, Sr. 



2005 
2005 
2007 
2007 



Master Plan Committee (continued) 

Randi R. Holland 
William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
Sidney R. Kaizer 
Margaret A. Kane 
Vincent Licciardi 
James T. Murray 
Kathleen Reynolds 
Frederick W. Russell, Jr. 
Debra L. Russo 
Karl I . Sagal 
Beverly A. Shea 
Michael A. Sorrentino 
Martha K. Stevenson 
Barbara Sullivan 
Suzanne M. Sullivan 
Ernest M. Wallent 
Jane A. Williams-Vale 
Daniel E. Woodbury 
Ann L . Yurek 

Open Space Committee 

James H. Morris, Chairman 
Betty M. Bigwood 
Leland B. Chisholm 
Deborah E. Cipriani 
Richard H. Grinder, Jr. 
William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
Joseph M. Kennedy 
Kenneth J. Lifton 
Barry J. Mulholland 
Iva Marie Rideout 
Jean Rowe 
Beverly A. Shea 
Martha K. Stevenson 
Barbara Sullivan 
Suzanne M. Sullivan 

Permanent Building Committee 

Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 
John C. Holloway 
Joseph A. Langone 
Paul J. Melaragni 
Joseph J. Parrella, Jr. 



2005 
2005 
2006 
2006 
2007 



-213- 



Boards^. Committees & Commissioos 2004 



Term 

Expires 

Planning Board 

Michael A. Sorrentino, Chairman 2007 



Ann L. Yurek, Clerk 2009 

Randi R. Holland 2005 

David G. Shedd 2006 

James F. Banda, Jr. 2008 

Recreation Commission 

C. Michael Burns, Chairman 2005 

Sheila Burke, Vice Chairman 2006 

Maribeth Crupi 2006 

Larry G. Noel 2007 

Jay Tighe 2007 

Redevelopment Authority 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 2006 

Edward P. Loud, Sr. 2007 

Jason R. Tildsley 2008 

John Goggin 2 009 

Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 

James M. Gillis, Vice Chairman 2006 

Robert G. Peterson 2007 

Registrars, Board of 

Alice M. Hooper, Chairman 2006 

Edward L. Sousa 2005 

Barbara J. Buck 2007 
Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Scholarship Fund Committee 

William H. McAlduff, Jr, Chmn. 2005 

Barry R. Cahill 2005 

John J. DeMarco 2 005 

Robert G. Peterson 2005 

Rita Boudreau 2005 

Town Forest Committee 

Forrest G. Downs 2005 



Term 

Expires 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris 2006 
Lorraine P. Dineen 2006 
M. Ronald Mendes 2 006 

275*^*^ Anniversary Celebration Committee 

John P. Gushing, Chairman 

Robert Boyce 

Robert A. Brown 

C. Michael Burns 

Robert J. Cain 

Deborah Cipriani 

Sandra S. Curtin 

Dianna DiGregorio 

Edward Harrison 

George W. Hooper, Sr. 

Joan L. Maga 

Marlene Moran 

Adele C. Passmore 

Kathleen Reynolds 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Bonny A. Smith 

James C. Stewart 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Joseph J. Balliro, Jr., Chairman 2007 



George Allan 2005 

Matthew J. Kane 2 00 6 

Wilmington Arts Council 

Jane M. Crane, Chairman 2007 

H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 2005 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 2005 

Marguerite Elia 2005 

Evelyn Choate Gibbs 2005 

Tracey A. MacNeill 2005 

Lucina Roark 2005 

Carolyn L. Stanhope 2 005 

Annette Campbell 2007 

David J. Maison, Programming 2007 



* Advisory Board members 



-214- 



Boards^ Committees & Commissioos 2004 

Wilmington Election Officers - Term Expires Annually 



Precinct 1 

Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Linda Berberian, Dep. Warden 
Anna Giannotti, Clerk 
Mary Schultz, Deputy Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Sandra S. Volpe, Alternate 
Priscilla R. Ward, Alternate 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Alternate 
Hazel O'Brien, Alternate 

Precinct 2 

Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Dep. Warden 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Dep. Clerk 
Helen Brady, Inspector 
Robert J. Sweet, Inspector 
Audrey E. Riddle, Alternate 

Precinct 3 

Patricia McKenna, Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Minnie Kirby, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Shirley Brush, Inspector 
Terri L. Woods, Alternate 
Janice Quandt , Alternate 
Ruth Holbrook, Alternate 
Anna Simmons, Alternate 



Precinct 4 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Dep. Warden 
Marilyn West, Dep. Clerk 
Florence Webster, Inspector 
Gail Gass, Dep. Inspector 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Alternate 
Denise M. Kearns , Alternate 
Joanna E. Clayton, Alternate 
Phyllis Hailey, Alternate 

Precinct 5 

Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Mary Husen, Dep. Clerk 
Judith A. Simmons, Inspector 
Veronica M. DiOrio, Alternate 
Al Antinarelli, Alternate 
Nita Beals, Alternate 
Maureen Fiorenza, Alternate 
Susan Delaney, Alternate 
Beverly Dalton, Alternate 
Cynthia McCue, Alternate 

Precinct 6 

Evelyn W. Conlin, Warden 
Donald Armstrong, Dep. Warden 
Phyllis Vieira, Dep. Warden 
Margaret L. Perry, Inspector 
Jean Mazzocca, Dep. Inspector 
Joanne Roberto, Alternate 
Jean LeFavour, Alternate 
Mary F. Kiesinger, Alternate 
Karen Armata, Alternate 
Margaret White, Alternate 



-215- 



Accountant 

Administrative Assistant 
Animal Control/Inspector 
Assistant Town Manager 
Assessor, Principal 

Community Development Program Director 
Constable 

Elderly Services Director 
Emergency Management Director 
Engineering Director 
Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Exec. Director 
Inspector of Buildings 
Ipswich River Watershed Assoc. 
Librarian 

Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 

Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board 

Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council 

Middlesex Canal Commission 
Museum Curator 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee 

Planning/Conservation Director 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Police Chief 

Public Buildings Superintendent 

Public Health Director 

Public Health Nurse 

Public Works Superintendent 

Reading Municipal Light Dept. 
Advisory Board 

Recreation Director 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Treasurer /Col lector 

Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 

Water & Sewer Superintendent 

Wiring Inspector 



Michael Morris 694-2029 

Beverly J. Dalton 658-3311 

Ellen G. Davis 658-7845 

Jeffrey M. Hull 658-3311 

Humphrey J. Moynihan 658-3675 

James Chaput 658-9843 

Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 658-6140 

Theresa Marciello 657-7595 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Anthony Pronski 658-4499 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Karen DeJoie 658-8531 

Daniel W. Paret 658-4531 

Vacant 658-2024 

Christina A. Stewart 658-2967 

Michael V. McCoy 658-3311 

Michael J. Woods 658-4711 

Carole S. Hamilton 658-8238 

Betty M. Bigwood 657-7870 
Michael J. Mclnnis 

Kathleen Black Reynolds 658 

Michael A. Caira 658 

Donald N. Onusseit 658 

Carole S. Hamilton 658 

Paul Raffi 658 

Robert H. Spencer 658 

Roger J. Lessard 658 

Gregory P. Erickson 658 

Ann V. FitzGerald, R.N. 694 

Donald N. Onusseit 658 

Roger J. Lessard 658 

Roger E. Stevenin 658 

Deborah E. Cipriani 658 

James J. Babineau (781) 665 

Kathleen M. Scanlon 658 

Paul DeRensis (617) 951 

Michael A. Caira 658 

M. Ronald Mendes 658 

Louis Cimaglia, IV 694 

Michael J. Woods 658 

Frederick Sutter 658 



-5475 

-3311 
-4481 

-8238 
-4531 
-5071 
-3017 
-4298 
-2041 
-4481 
-3017 
-5600 
-4270 
-8301 
-2030 
-2300 
-3311 
-3531 
-2040 
-4711 
-4531 



-216- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates-2"'* & 4*'^ Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as the town's chief elected officials. The Board is responsible for 
appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town Counsel and the Town 
Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for issuing numerous licenses 
including alcohol licenses, common victualer licenses and licenses to operate 
automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Michael V. McCoy, Chairman 
Raymond N . Lepore 
Michael J. Newhouse 
Suzanne M. Sullivan 
Frank J. West 

Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the town. He supervises and 
directs the administration of all departments, boards and commissions except for the 
Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, 
Election Officers and Registrars of Voters. His duties include the appointment and 
removal, if necessary, of staff and members of certain boards and commissions; 
attendance at all regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise 
and recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the town; 
representing the town in all litigation to which the town is a party; acting as the 
Chief Fiscal Officer of the town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive 
annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on behalf of 
the town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the town's health, workmans ' 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; developing 
the town's recycling program and insuring that the town meets the procurement 
regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town Manager serves as staff 
director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with the preparation of the 
annual budget and provides general assistance to the Town Manager in other areas of 
municipal administration. 

Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping of 
records and documents, the issuance of licenses and the administration of elections. 
In terms of the town records the Clerk records proceedings of all town meetings and 
elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital statistics and Filing Officer 
for birth and death certificates, zoning decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also 
issues marriage licenses, fish and game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The clerk acts 
as supervisor of all elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 




-217- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 694-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve town funds. 
The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all bills owed by 
the town. The Accountant maintains the complete official financial records of the 
town and prepares other financial records and reports as needed. Additionally, this 
office participates in the preparation of the annual budget. 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property taxes 
necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated equitably on 
the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors are required to 
compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property within the town at 
fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, except for property qualifying 
for preferential assessments such as forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax 
rates depend on three factors: (1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax 
levy or amount to be raised from property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - M. Ronald Mendes - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of monies due 
the town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and charges for water, 
sewer and ambulance services. This department is responsible for preparing the 
weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector monitors the town's cash flow and arranges 
for short-term and long-term borrowing. The department serves as custodian of all 
town funds. All municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax 
title and foreclosure proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the 
Treasurer/Collector . 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Carole S. Hamilton - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake studies of 
land use, economic development, housing, transportation and other matters related to 
community development; compile and maintain maps, statistics and records related to 
land use and development; review individual proposals for development and for 
compliance with the subdivision regulations and zoning by-law; and prepare 
applications and administer grants related to planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act - Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 131, 
Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public interest issues related to 
wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection of public and private 
water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention of pollution, protection 
of fisheries and protection of land containing shellfish. Some of the department's 
responsibilities include reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure 
their compliance with the town and State wetlands statutes. In addition, the 
department manages several pieces of property throughout town which have been placed 
into the town's custody as conservation land. 

Building Inspector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 

The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the town's Zoning By-law, the State 
Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department provides 
assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, contractors and 
individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans and permit applications. 
The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, gas fitting and wiring 
inspections . 



-218- 



Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services include 
restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, all 
mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In addition, the department 
conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, septic system 
inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizen complaints regarding 
dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and hazardous waste spills. The 
department provides public nursing services. This includes an annual rabies clinic 
for dogs and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other diseases 
The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to Town residents. 
In addition, the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of the 
town . 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and 
extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety 
inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. All outdoor 
burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from the Fire Department. 
The department also issues permits for oil burner installations, the storage of 
flammable liquids such as gasoline and the purchase, storage and/or use of explosives 
such as dynamite, rockets and gun powder. The Fire Department provides emergency 
medical services to residents of Wilmington. Fire fighters trained as Emergency 
Medical Technicians are assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide 
emergency services and urgent care transport. 

Police Chief - Robert H. Spencer - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the protection of 
people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and traffic regulations. 
The department also enforces certain local by-laws and provides public education such 
as the DARE program. Animal Control services are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, cemeteries, 
water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is responsible for the 
care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking areas and traffic lights. The 
Engineering Division assists town departments, boards and commissions with 
engineering related projects, such as drainage problems, review of subdivision plans 
and inspection of subdivision roadway construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is 
responsible for the maintenance of the town's commons, parks and recreation areas. 
The Tree Division is responsible for the town's public shade and ornamental trees and 
maintenance of the trees on the Town Common. The Public Works Department is also 
responsible for the operation of the town's water supply, distribution, treatment 
systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection systems and the 
septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed by the Water & Sewer 
Department. The Department operates two water treatment plants in accordance with 
regulations established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal Environmental Agency (EPA) . 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program for 
many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and leaf disposal and 
oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 



-219- 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 square feet 
of building space. The department provides custodial services for all school 
buildings and most of the general government buildings. In addition to the custodial 
services, the department repairs and maintains all of the town's municipal buildings. 
Public Buildings provides for the complete set-up at all town elections and the 
annual and special town meetings. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an individual 
and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health information, 
educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, housing assistance, 
transportation and counseling. Additional services included assistance with social 
security and medicaid concerns . 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library seeks 
to provide basic educational, informational and recreational library services. Staff 
provides reference and reader services to adults and children, furnishing access to 
the wide spectrum of information available in books and other materials. Technical 
services utilizes the tools of library technology to provide the means for 
informational access and retrieval. The library is a member of the Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium, a thirty-five member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley 
area. This membership allows library patrons to access library resources in each of 
the twenty-nine member towns. 

Recreation Director - Deborah E. Cipriani - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for children 
and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department include a summer 
swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the Tiny Tots program, summer 
recreation program for children, ladies fitness, day trips to Provincetown and New 
York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and a number of other programs. In 
addition, the Recreation Department offers resources for travel such as discounts to 
Walt Disney World. 

Veterans' Agent - Louis Cimaglia, IV - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans and 
their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a large part by 
the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of cash grants to cover such items as 
living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent also offers assistance in 
applying for pensions and other programs administered by the United States Veterans 
Administration. 



-220- 



BoardSj Committees & Commissions 
Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 




Date 


Room 


Building 






Time 


APPEALS, BOARD OF 


2 ST 


& 3*^ Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m. 


ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 


2 ST 


Wednesday 




Arts Center 


7 


00 


P 


m. 


ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 


2ND 


Thursday 


2 


Town Hall 


9 


00 


a 


m. 


CARTER LECTURE FUND 


As 


Needed 














CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 


As 


Needed 














COMMUNITY ADVISORY PANEL 


2ND 


Thursday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m. 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 


4TH 


Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


9 


30 


a 


m. 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 


^ST 


£c 2^ Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m 


DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM. 


As 


Needed 














ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 


2RD 


Thursday 




Sr. Center 


1 


30 


P 


m. 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


2ND 


Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


m. 


HEALTH, BOARD OF 


^RD 


Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


6 


00 


P 


m. 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 


2ND 


Monday 




Harnden Tavern 


7 


30 


P 


m. 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 


Q^ST 


Thursday 




Deming Way 


10 


00 


a 


m. 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 


2ND 


Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


6 


00 


P 


m. 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


^RD 


Tuesday 




Library 


7 


00 


P 


m 


MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE 


4TH 


Thursday 


AUD 


Town Hall 


7 


30 


P 


. m 


PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 


As 


Needed 




Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


. m 


PLANNING BOARD 


2 ST 


& 3*^ Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


:30 


P 


. m 


RECREATION COMMISSION 


2 ST 


Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


7 


.00 


P 


. m 


REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 


Monthly 




Shaw. Tech. 


7 


.30 


P 


. m 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 


2ND 


Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


7 


00 


P 


. m 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


2ND 


& 4™ Wednesday 


LIB 


High School 


7 


: 00 


P 


. m 


SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 


2ND 


& 4™ Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7 


:00 


P 


. m 


TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 


As 


Needed 














275™ ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 


-j^ST 


Monday 




4™ July Bldg. 


7 


30 


P 


M 


WATER Sc SEWER COMMISSION 


jRD 


Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


5 


00 


P 


m 



-221- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Acorn Drive from 

Adams Street from 

Adelaide Street from 

Agostino Drive from 

Agostino Drive from 

Aldrich Road from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allenhurst Way from 

Allen Park Drive from 

Amherst Road from 

Andover Street from 

Andover Street from 

Andrew Street from 

Anthony Avenue from 

Apache Way from 

Apollo Drive from 

Apple tree Lane from 

Arlene Avenue from 

Ashwood Avenue from 

Aspen Drive from 

Auburn Avenue from 

Avon Street from 

Ayotte Street from 



Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 
Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Gandalf Way 

Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 

Woburn Street 

Allgrove Lane to dead-end 

Woburn Street 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 
Shawsheen Ave to end of cul-de-sac 
Salem Street 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 
Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 
Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 
Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 
Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 
Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 
Salem Street to Ella Avenue 
Andover St. thru cul-de-sac 
Russell Road thru cul-de-sac 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 
Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 



385 


1998 


2 , 915 


1908 


666 


1976 


999 


1979 


580 


1996 


6, 740 


1894 


470 


1993 


430 


1996 


1 , 161 


1994 


2,319 


1971 


1, 500 


1996 


180 


1894 


11, 300 


1894 


435 


1985 


300 


1966 


1, 675 


1998 


300 


1971 


994 


1990 


3 , 754 


1966 


2, 800 


1998 


320 


1999 


755 


1945 


320 


1999 


240 


1947 



1984 



1970 



1978 



Bailey Road 


from Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Rd 




165 


1998 




Bailey Road 


from 


Aldrich Rd. southeasterly to Bailey Rd. 


538 


1999 




Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 




684 


1945 




Baker Street 


from 


Existing Baker Street 




135 


2001 




Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 




540 


1972 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 




965 


1894 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Route 12 5 to Andover Line 


12, 


000 


1894 


1985 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 




400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 




850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 




970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1, 


005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Ave. 




440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 




980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 




616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1, 


282 


1975 




Birch Road 


from 


Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 




345 


1999 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1, 197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 




400 


1953 




Blanchard Road 


from 


Kendall Road 




625 


1989 




Blueberry Lane 


from 


Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


1, 


600 


1998 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4, 


144 


1894 


1960 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 




510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 




950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 


1, 


066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woods ide Avenue 


1, 


017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 




455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 




754 


1894 





-222- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 


Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 


Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1, 145 


1953 


Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 


Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1, 653 


1945 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3, 577 


1894 


Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 



Canal Street from 

Carolyn Road from 

Carson Avenue from 

Carter Lane from 

Castle Drive from 

Catherine Avenue from 

Cedar Street from 

Cedar Crest Road from 

Central Street from 

Chandler Road from 

Chapman Avenue from 

Charlotte Road from 

Chase Road from 

Cherokee Lane from 

Chestnut Street from 

Church Street from 

Clark Street from 

Clorinda Road from 

Colonial Drive from 

Cochrane Road from 

Columbia Street from 

Concord Street from 

Congress Street from 

Cook Avenue from 

Coolidge Road from 

Corey Avenue from 

Cornell Place from 

Cottage Street from 

Cottonwood Circle from 

Crest Avenue from 

Cross Street from 

Crystal Road from 

Cunningham St. from 

Gushing Drive from 

Cypress Street from 



Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 
North Street to Marcia Road 
Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave to beyond Norfolk Ave . 
Burlington Ave left to Burlington Ave 
Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Burt Road to Harris Street 
Pinewood Road to Judith Road 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Adams Street to Kelley Road 
Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 
Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 
Hathaway Road 

Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 
Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 
Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street to Church Street 
Agostino Drive 

Middlesex Avenue thru cul-de-sac 
Forest Street to Wabash Road 
Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 
Federal Street to North Reading Line 
Forest Street to Burlington Line 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 

Canal Street to Grand Street 
Fordham Road 
Main Street 

Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 
Ayotte Street 

Main Street to Lowell Street 
Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 
Salem Street to Beeching Ave 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Glen Road 



1, 


505 


1 Q Q 
± y ^ J 


1, 268 


J. 2/ D U 


1. 


017 


i J7 D -L 


1, 


411 


±y D / 


1, 325 


1 QQ7 
±yy/ 


1, 


000 


X j7 O D 




687 




1. 


100 






552 






400 


± y D / 


1, 575 


1 Q 1 




859 


X y f X 




297 


xyo J 




812 


1 Q Q Q 
xyyy 


11, 


480 


xoyi 


4, 


285 


1 Q Q A 


2, 


470 


xoyi 




887 


10 7 

xy / y 




375 


1997 




800 


1947 


1, 


150 


1908 


5, 


803 


1894 




977 


1939 




813 


1946 




270 


1951 




366 


1951 




747 


1982 




927 


1954 




280 


1998 




558 


1947 




697 


1894 




895 


1996 


2, 


447 


1944 




990 


1993 




260 


1951 



Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1, 760 


1964 


Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 


Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1, 794 


1958 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 


Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1, 402 


1954 


Dogwood Lane 


from 


Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 


Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1, 214 


1951 


Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1, 490 


1960 


Douglas Avenue 


from 


Palmer Way 


1, 017 


1989 


Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1, 560 


1959 


Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 


Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 


Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 



-223- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 





f rom 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


3 ,200 


1894 


Earles Row 


from 


Route 62 


820 


1994 




f rom 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 


450 


1947 


Elizabeth Drive 


from 


Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 


1, 348 


1999 


Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1, 043 


1978 


El wood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 


Emerson Street 


f rom 


Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


590 


1951 


Emerald Avenue 


from 


Andover Street westerly thru cul-de-sac 400 


2000 


Enalewood Drive 


from 


Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 


Evans Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


2, 071 


1971 


Everett Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham St . 


480 


1979 


Fairfield Road 


f rom 


Main Street 


1,299 


1946 


Fairmeadow Road 


f rom 


Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


2, 328 


1958 


Fairinont Avenue 


from 


Molloy Road 


952 


1971 


Fairview Avenue 


from 


State Street 


648 


1933 


Faneuil Drive 


from 


Mass . Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 


790 


1950 


Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1, 946 


1944 


Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Ave northeasterly to dead end 125 


1999 


Fav Street 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


714 


193 8 




f rom 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5, 740 


1894 


Fenwav Street 


f rom 


Rollins Rd to end of cul-de-sac 


375 


2004 


Ferouson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 073 


1967 


FerTibanks Road 

X. sj. X. X XX_/ CX X 1 JV ^ X\. V>/ CX V«X 


from 


Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 


550 


1996 


Flagstaff Road 


from 


Nichols Street 


587 


1989 


Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 


Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 


Flynn Way 


from 


Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 


680 


1996 


Foley Farm Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to end of cul-de-sac 363 


2004 


Fordham Road 


from North Reading Line 


3 , 714 


1971 


Forest Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4 , 100 


1894 


Fox Run Drive 


from High Street 


975 


1989 


Franklin Avenue 

^ ^ VX X X J V ^ ^ X X V X X Ui 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


739 


1978 


X X. V_> X- -J- / v X. iX V 


from 


Salem Street 


1, 070 


1966 


X X. ^ w X ^ X-/ X X. V 


from 


Park Street to Lucaya Circle 


2, 086 


1979 


Gandalf Wav 


from 


Glen Road to Agostino Drive 


549 


1979 


Gatehouse Tiane 


from 


Towpath Road 


380 


1994 


Nj w d J. y J. v_ 


from 


Ring Avenue 


627 


1989 


m en PoaH 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


X O J' ^ 




from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1, 304 


1 

J. J7 Q ^ 


wXwliV -L C W I\.WCIVh1 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1 Q Q 

-L -/ J -7 


wx^x-Ld wcty 


from 


Broad Street 


770 


1 Q R Q 


Cowing Road 


from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 


Grace Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 


2, 514 


1966 


wX ClixLi rW \Z LlKjisZ 


from 


Corey Avenue 


815 


1 Q 7 


CIy'^t\Y' C 1- y" #a (=* 1- 

OXdllU OL.XCCL. 


from 


Federal Street 


780 


1 Q A 1 




from 


Woburn Street 


536 


1 Q Q Q 


wX <ta/ V C J~lVdlL>xC 


from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4, 147 


1 Q 1 n 


WX^VC OCXwCL. 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1 Q 

X 3 o / 


Giinde 1*5011 Poad 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1, 506 


1 Q Q 

X 17 3 J/ 


Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 


Hanover Street 


from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1988 


Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


1969 


Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 


Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 


Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1, 312 


1971 



1953 



1945 



1976 



1966 



-224- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 




Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 




Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


1953 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 




Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 




Henry L. Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


651 


1993 




High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3, 585 


1894 




Hiiisiae Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 




Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 




Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1, 560 


1945 


1951 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3, 051 


1894 


1972 


Houghton Road 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1, 702 


1985 




Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 




Isaoeiia Way 


from 


West Street 


385 


2001 




Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 398 


1938 


1949 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1, 248 


1968 




Jewel Drive 


from 


Eames Street 


1, 303 


1985 




Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 




Jonspin Road 


from 


Andover Street 


3, 800 


1993 




Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 




Ka j in Way 


from 


Woburn Street 


455 


1989 




Kelley Road 


from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 




Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,420 


1945 




Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


1, 725 


1970 


1971 


Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 




Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1, 840 


1894 




King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,400 


1940 


1945 


King Street Ext. 


from 


Glen Road 


487 


1979 




Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 




Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3, 855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4, 013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 




Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1 , 050 


lybi 




Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Lorin Drive 


from 


Swain Road 


560 


1992 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10 , 152 


1894 


1978 


Lowell St. Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 




Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21, 387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2 , 806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2, 315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1, 525 


1961 


1966 



1959 



1952 
1975 



1951 



1958 



-225- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond 










Clifton Street 


1, 876 


1945 


Marion Street 


from 


Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 


Marion Street 


from 


Marion St . southeasterly to Marion 


St . 1, 133 


2000 


Marion Street 


from 


Marion St. southerly an additional 


950 


2001 


Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 392 


1951 


Massachusetts Ave 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 


McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2, 621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


1997 


Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Meadow Brook Rd. 


from 


Factory Rd. southeasterly 


204 


2001 


Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12 , 140 


1894 


Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 


Molloy Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


988 


2001 


Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 










Wedgewood Avenue 


1, 528 


1967 


Moore Street 


from 


Existing Moore Street 


630 


2001 


Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1, 298 


1908 





f rom 


ollawollccn /WcilUc L-O JJUriuOll KCjaLL 


1 ^; 

X t D o o 


X -7 *4 O 


IsJo. L.Xi.a.n. KOaQ 


f rom 




X , U D / 


1 Q '7 1 
X J7 / X 




f rom 


Olia.WSn€€n /\V€nu.6 CO ox ± J. 6 XT J. CcL XiXIic 




1 P Q A 




X. 1. \Jlll 




y ^ J 


A. ^ 1 


Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3, 515 


1945 


N. Washington Ave 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 


Nottingham Drive 


from 


Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 


Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 


Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1, 730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 


Oxbow Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 


Palmer Way 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 


Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4 , 180 


1895 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2 , 000 


1919 


Patches Pond Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1, 185 


1990 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


Pilcher Drive 


from 


the end of Gearty Street 


410 


1989 


Pilling Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North St . to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1, 364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Cir. 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Presidential Dr. thru cul-de-sac 


768 


1998 


Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 



-226- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Ouail Run 


i- J. k^LIL 


Woburn Street 


500 


1992 


Radcliff Road 


f r om 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 




Reading Avenue 


f r om 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 


Reading Avenue 


f rom 


Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead-end 160 


1997 


Redwood Teirace 


from 


i\cnwooa Avenue 


645 


1970 


X\. ^ ^ \A. k_P \_ J_ \^ 


i- I. KJlll 


onawsneen Ave . uo Deyona naroid Ave . 


1,090 


1971 


O CI ±. ^11 ±J ^ X V C 




i3a±xarava±e bcreet 


1,817 


198 9 


Richmond Street 


from 


I'ldxii ocreet. to onawsneen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Rina Avenue 


f rom 


odxciii otreec co sxggar Avenue 


1,150 


ly /b 




f r om 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


453 


1962 


XvN-^ X. ^ O X\. \^ d. \_ri 


"F T"om 

x. ±. will 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1,861 


1 y o / 


XXS^ X -L 11 X\.WCaU 


1- 1. Will 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


1\.V«^ v-' s ^ V X l_. X\.WCLV^ 


F T^om 
±. i. will 


i5(juu wcXi ocreeu co owam KoaQ 


1,980 


1 y 4 D 




J- JL Will 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


loco 

lybo 


R o va 1 Street 


f rom 




1 , 04 o 


1 y D 1 


^^'\ em ^tr"eet 


"F v"(^m 

J- 1. Will 


icwjvsjjury iiine uo ceyonQ 










caxiaruvaie icreet 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Str*eet 


^ T*om 

i- J. Will 


jNorun Keaumg Liine co Deyona 










woDurn ocreec 


6,475 


ioy4 


WC11.C11.X11C1. (3 i*ciy 


"F Tf^m 

i. J. will 


Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


450 


1 Q Q 




■F T"om 
i- 1. will 


Salem Street 


785 


1 on A 
1 y / 4 




f rom 


Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1, 139 


1 Q 1 C 

1 y lb 


t^wllwV^Cl. XJCtllC 


"F vom 

J- J. will 


Tacoma Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


530 


o n n A 


c pi -p pi V Po^H 


J- L will 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1 Q'7 T 

1 y / 1 




■F T"om 
J- X will 


Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1 Q Q Q 


CciUTial 1 Pr^aH 
O C W C J L In-V^ d Li. 


J- 1. will 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1 Q 


oiia.cj.y ija.xic jjxrive 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2, 904 


1 Q c n 
lybU 


011ClWoIi.CCii nv C 11 Lie 


f rom 


beyond Richmond Street to 










Billerica Line 


11, 845 


1 Q Q i1 

1 o y 4 


oiicx.JJU.1.11 irXaCc 


£ rom 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1 3 / D 


ori6irXQa,n KOa.Q 


f rom 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1, 021 


1 y b 1 




f rom 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1 J7 / 1 


silver Lake Ave. 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Somerset Place 


from 


Mystic Avenue easterly thru cul-de-sac 878 


2000 


opa.nia.wK unve 


f rom 


Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1 17 / 17 


opruce woou Koaa 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1 Q "5 


ocaue bcreec 


from 


Belmont Ave. to Fairview Ave. 


315 


1 Q "J "J 
1 y J J 


Stonehedge Drive 


from 


Castle Dr. northerly thru cul-de-sac 


1, 400 


1 y y / 


Strout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1 Q C C 

lybb 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1, 246 


1 Q C y1 

iyb4 


Swain Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2 , 290 


1 Q O O 

1 y z ^ 


iart Koad 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1, 986 


1 Q "5 Q 

1 y J £3 


Taplin Avenue 


f rom 


Wisser Street 


461 


xy^o 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1 y 4 o 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


T Q T T 

1 y 1 1 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1 Q 1 
1 J D 1 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracy Circle 


from 


Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 



-227- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1, 105 


1954 


Wakefield Avenue 


from 


Buckingham St. easterly to dead end 


355 


1999 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1, 650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Wedgewood Ave. southeast thru cul-de- 


-sac 75 


1997 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8 , 372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1, 211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1, 050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5, 290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1, 146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23, 122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1, 174 


1969 



-228- 



) 



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Telephone Number 

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658-4531 

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694-2006 
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